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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: consumer society

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  • Ad And Ego - 422 words
    Ad And Ego The Ad and the Ego Students will never look at an ad the same way again after screening The Ad and the Ego, the first comprehensive examination of advertising and our culture of consumption. The film artfully intercuts clips from hundreds of familiar television ads with insights from Stuart Ewen, Jean Kilbourne, Richard Pollay, Sut Jhally, Bernard McGrane and other noted critics, performing a cultural psychoanalysis of late 20th century America and its principal inhabitants, Consumer Man and Woman. The Ad and the Ego depicts how the market economy has metastasized until today commercialism invades the most intimate aspects of our lives. The average American is exposed to 1500 ads ...
    Related: individual psychology, political beliefs, environmental degradation, market
  • Andy Worhal - 1,891 words
    Andy Worhal Andy Worhal Andy Warhol, the American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and film maker was born in Pittsburgh on August 6, 1928, shortly afterwards settling in New York. The only son of immigrant, Czech parents, Andy finished high school and went on to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, graduating in 1949 with hopes of becoming an art teacher in the public schools. While in Pittsburgh, he worked for a department store arranging window displays, and often was asked to simply look for ideas in fashion magazines . While recognizing the job as a waste of time, he recalls later that the fashion magazines "gave me a sense of style and other career opportunities." Upon ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, jasper johns, corporate image, rows
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • British Authors Think Great Britian Is Shaping World Events Through - 1,905 words
    British Authors Think Great Britian is Shaping World Events Through Intelligence Agencies British authors believe that their country of Great Britain is shaping world events potentially and morally through its intelligence agencies. Morally , there are several methods in which they have shown this. In Ian Fleming's books, James Bond embodied the idea of a consumer society which have morally affected society. The sadistic infliction of pain is another formula used in many of Ian Fleming's James Bond books that morall y affects society. They have also potentially affected world events with their intelligenc e agencies. In several cases, the British have solved the potentially serious problems ...
    Related: authors, british, free world, great britain, real world, shaping
  • Comparative Sociology - 2,076 words
    ... heir work. In fact many would consider people like Nietzsche, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, precursors to postmodern theory. So, we get to the big question, what makes a theory postmodern? This is a tough question and one that really shouldnt be answered in the limited space available in this paper.. But, I am going to attempt to do it anyway. The quickest answer is that postmodern theories/theorists are those that are labeled by modernists. Most of the people that we associate closely with postmodern theory, in Sociology, would reject the label for themselves, including Michel Foucault, Jean-Francois Lyotard, and Baudrillard. Modernists are the ones who assign the labels. However, there must ...
    Related: comparative, sociology, modern literature, consumer society, movies
  • Dispossable Animals - 2,740 words
    ... encies often favor these projects (MFAT). Mankind has a tendency to seek out the fastest and easiest way to devise an answer, usually for the cheapest cost. Sadly, it seems animals may not be entirely saved from this tendency soon enough. Global Awareness - While animals continue to be violated in laboratories, a consciousness about our responsibility toward our relationship with animals has begun and continued to rise. As a result of pressures from animal advocacy groups such as PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), a number of large corporations have ceased all animal testing in recent years. These corporations include Avon, Amway, Benetton, Revlon and even General Motors ...
    Related: animal cruelty, animal experimentation, animal research, animal testing, using animals
  • Frederick James The Limites Of Post Modern Theory - 2,443 words
    Frederick James - The Limites of Post Modern Theory The impetus behind this paper has been the recent publication of Fredric Jameson's 1991 Welleck Lectures, The Seeds of Time.1 As these lectures were delivered a decade after Jameson's initial attempts to map the terrain of postmodernity it appeared to me to provide an occasion to reflect upon the current status of Jameson's highly influential and much criticised theory of postmodernism as the cultural logic of late capitalism. It also enables me to return to, what I consider to be, one of the most troubling aspects of Jameson's writing on postmodernism, that is to say, the "waning", to use Jameson's term, of the political imagination. As Ja ...
    Related: frederick, post modern, capitalist system, late capitalism, rational
  • Frederick James The Limites Of Post Modern Theory - 2,443 words
    Frederick James - The Limites of Post Modern Theory The impetus behind this paper has been the recent publication of Fredric Jameson's 1991 Welleck Lectures, The Seeds of Time.1 As these lectures were delivered a decade after Jameson's initial attempts to map the terrain of postmodernity it appeared to me to provide an occasion to reflect upon the current status of Jameson's highly influential and much criticised theory of postmodernism as the cultural logic of late capitalism. It also enables me to return to, what I consider to be, one of the most troubling aspects of Jameson's writing on postmodernism, that is to say, the "waning", to use Jameson's term, of the political imagination. As Ja ...
    Related: frederick, post modern, third world, global scale, contradiction
  • Korean Temple - 1,157 words
    Korean Temple Buddhist monks, those shaven-headed figures in gray robes, choose to leave this earthly world (that is, mundane society) in favor of an ascetic existence based on prayer and self-denial. But now their unworldly lifestyle is becoming a tourist product... with the monastics' approval! Monastic life as a tourist attraction? It's part of a global craze for monasticism. From the Himalayas to the Hudson River, monks are in. Japanese salarymen are chucking their jobs and fleeing to monasteries. In Taiwan last year, monasticism become big news. Hundreds of families were shocked when their promising sons and daughters opted for Buddhist monastic life instead of comfy careers in business ...
    Related: korean, korean culture, temple, belief system, hudson river
  • Nafta - 1,847 words
    ... e for babies born in Cameron County, TX climbed to 19/10,000 babies, almost twice the national average. The public health crisis plaguing the U.S.-Mexico border attracted intense media scrutiny in 1991 after three babies were born with a rare condition called anencephaly (born brainless) during a 36-hour period at the same Cameron County (Brownsville) Hospital. The Texas Department of Health Neural Tube Defect Surveillance Project reported a new cluster of defects in 1995. The Department recently declared that The entire border area remains a high-risk area [for neural tube defects] compared to the rest of the U.S. As the health crisis looms overhead, so too does the disparity in wage le ...
    Related: nafta, north american, living wage, economic development, trading
  • Rabbits Immobilized In Wooden Stocks With Ulcers In Their - 983 words
    ... uch as PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) and AAVS (American Anti-Vivisection Society), a number of large corporations have ceased all animal testing in recent years. These corporations include Avon, Amway, Benetton, Revlon and even General Motors, who used to subject animals to crash/impact tests. In addition, the general public has begun to lean toward and seek out those products which are not tested on animals, in the cosmetics industry, cruelty-free products are one of the fastest growing market segments (Sequoia, 27). Consumers have at long-last begun to realize that with the vast number of cosmetics and personal care products on the market today, it is impossible fo ...
    Related: ulcers, wooden, albert einstein, theory of evolution, addresses
  • The Dust Bowl - 1,338 words
    The Dust Bowl The Dust Bowl was the darkest moment in the twentieth-century life of the southern plains, (pg. 4) as described by Donald Worster in his book The Dust Bowl. It was a time of drought, famine, and poverty that existed in the 1930's. It's cause, as Worster presents in a very thorough manner, was a chain of events that was perpetuated by the basic capitalistic society's need for expansion and consumption. Considered by some as one of the worst ecological catastrophes in the history of man, Worster argues that the Dust Bowl was created not by nature's work, but by an American culture that was working exactly the way it was planned. In essence, the Dust Bowl was the effect of a socie ...
    Related: bowl, dust, dust bowl, dust storms, american society
  • The Ethical Basis For Ecosystem Management - 1,712 words
    The Ethical Basis for Ecosystem Management Andrew J. Green Ecosystem Management: The Human Dimension Establishing an environmental ethic is of utmost concern to the human species to better comprehend our place in the world and our potentials for the future. In doing so, we must extend our thinking of rights and responsibilities. I believe we must incorporate not only a temporal component, but also a spatial understanding of the world as an organic biotic community and how consumption is a part of the natural order. Aldo Leopold believes that conservation ethics must be rooted in a determination: A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic com ...
    Related: ecosystem, ethical, management, energy resources, natural order
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