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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: constitutional rights

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  • Abortion - 708 words
    Abortion Abortion The founding of our nation was forged on the principle that all men are created equal. This is the essence of our Declaration of Independence and the philosophy behind the Constitution. We, through history, have made certain that all people in this country have equality before the law. We have set up the premise that all people are equal before the law. We have declared that there is no such thing as sub-humans -- and that no human being's rights are superior to another human being. If we want to live by the premises that we set up in this country, than we cannot overlook any human being, no one can be excluded. There is, however, a class of human beings that is being denie ...
    Related: abortion, constitutional rights, unborn child, right to life, tissue
  • Abortion And Murder - 1,060 words
    Abortion And Murder On January 22, 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court, in two separate decisions, Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton, declared that Congress and the states had to adopt a policy on abortion. Since then, abortion has been one of the most controversial issues in our country today. Every time the subject of abortion is raised, the same question always comes up: should people have the right to terminate an unborn child? The answer is no. No person should have the right to terminate an unborn child which has not yet had the chance to live, no matter what the reason is. Abortion is the termination of an alive, unborn child, which can experience pain through the process of an abortion. There i ...
    Related: abortion, national abortion, medical technology, genetic information, worry
  • Abortion Prochoice - 469 words
    Abortion - Pro-Choice Without a woman's right to do what she chooses with her body, her freedom and liberty are taken away. If for personal reasons, a women wants an abortion, as is, currently, her constitutional right, she has the freedom to do so. In some states, a woman's freedom to have an abortion has been severely limited. Because of this, many women have had abortions by people not medically licensed to perform them. Many of these unlicensed and unqualified people have used unsterile instruments, thus causing illness or death. A child needs to be loved and wanted. A baby whose mother resents his birth, will not receive the proper care and nurturing he deserves. Perhaps, he would be be ...
    Related: abortion, pro-choice movement, freedom and liberty, self determination, severely
  • Adult Entertainment And First Ammendment Rights - 1,283 words
    Adult Entertainment And First Ammendment Rights The essence of the American dream stems from freedom. Before this nation was even called the United States of America, religious separatists ventured across the Atlantic Ocean so that they would be free to practice a religion that was not controlled by the state. Today, we find ourselves in a constant battle with ethics, morals and values in the United States. Seeing that we are a nation that is culturally diverse myriad of cultures and religions has been mixed together and the final outcome is the society that we live in today. A serious conflict between the "morally correct" and the "ethically deficient" is the topic of sex and sexuality. Mos ...
    Related: adult, ammendment, constitutional rights, entertainment, first amendment
  • Affirmative Action In Florida - 1,694 words
    ... of $3 million. These innovations will hopefully encourage more minorities to apply for certification. Once certification is no longer an issue, the task of building relationships between procuring agents and minority businesses must be addressed. One major problem that Bush sees is that much of Florida's state business is done as a result of long-standing relationships between State procurement agents and vendors, minority businesses often find it difficult to 7 break in(Equity in Contracting). Seeing as the bulk of the minority population and its businesses are located in South Florida, ONE FLORIDA proposes that by moving the Office to the Department of Management Services, where the ma ...
    Related: action plan, affirmative, affirmative action, florida, florida state, florida supreme court, south florida
  • Banned Books - 1,374 words
    Banned Books I never heard of anyone who was really literate or who ever really loved books who wanted to suppress any of them. Censors only read a book with great difficulty, moving their lips as they puzzle out each syllable, when someone tells them that the book is unfit to read. ~Robertson Davies Throughout all of history, human beings have been continuously seeking new mediums of communication, specifically for the purpose of exchanging ideas and information. This has been done in a series of ways, including spoken language, hand gestures, and, most importantly, the written word. The written word has an advantage over all other forms of communication, for it allows many people access to ...
    Related: banned, banned books, creative writing, critical thinking, readily
  • Bethel School Distric Vs Fraser - 719 words
    Bethel School Distric Vs Fraser Bethel School District vs. Fraser This case involved a public high school student, Matthew Fraser who gave a speech nominating another student for a student elective office. The speech was given at an assembly during school as a part of a school-sponsored educational program in self-government. While giving the speech, Fraser referred to his candidate in what the school board called elaborate, graphic, and explicit metaphor. After his speech, the assistant principal told Fraser that the school considered the speech a violation of the school's disruptive-conduct rule. This prohibited conduct that interfered with the educational process, including obscene, profa ...
    Related: fraser, high school, public school, school board, school district
  • Booker T Washington - 527 words
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington was the first African American whose likeness appeared on a United States postage stamp. Washington also was thus honored a quarter century after his death. In 1946 he also became the first black with his image on a coin, a 50-cent piece. The Tuskegee Institute, which Washington started at the age of 25, was the where the 10-cent stamps first were available. The educator's monument on its campus shows him lifting a symbolic veil from the head of a freed slave. Booker Taliaferro Washington was born a slave on April 5, 1856, in Franklin County, Va. His mother, Jane Burroughs, was a plantation cook. His father was an unknown white man. As a child, Booke ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, george washington, taliaferro washington, washington carver
  • Case: Gideon V Wainwright - 786 words
    Case: Gideon V. Wainwright Gideon v. Wainwright What most people don't know is that in the past those arrested for a crime did not really have the right to an attorney unless they had money. This became a right because Clarence Gideon, a prison inmate who did not have the money for a lawyer, took a pencil in his hand and wrote his own petition to the United States Supreme Court. Clarence Gideon, without a lawyer, took his case to the highest court in the country and won important rights for all of us. In 1961, Clarence Gideon was arrested in Florida on a charge of breaking and entering into a pool hall. Gideon was a likely suspect for the police to arrest: he was a 51-year old drifter who ha ...
    Related: gideon, wainwright, more harm, human beings, prosecution
  • Civil Rights - 1,047 words
    Civil Rights The 1960's were one of the most significant decades in the twentieth century. The sixties were filled with new music, clothes, and an overall change in the way people acted, but most importantly it was a decade filled with civil rights movements. On February 1, 1960, four black freshmen from North Carolina Agriculture and Technical College in Greensboro went to a Woolworth's lunch counter and sat down politely and asked for service. The waitress refused to serve them and the students remained sitting there until the store closed for the night. The very next day they returned, this time with some more black students and even a few white ones. They were all well dressed, doing the ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, right to vote, rights movement, voting rights
  • Civil Rights Movement - 1,376 words
    Civil Rights Movement African Americans have overcome many struggles as well as obstacles in the early years which have still not been terminated. African Americans have fought for freedom from enslavement, the right to earn a living, have land and a job, have equal justice, good quality education, to escape from oppression, the right to self pride and an end to stereotyping. Blacks everywhere got fed up with being treated as if they were inferior and slaves, so they banded together to form a movement. Not just any kind of movement, but a movement that would see victories as well as violence and death. That movement was the Civil Rights Movement. The Civil Rights Movement had a major goal, a ...
    Related: black power movement, civil rights, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, power movement, rights movement
  • Civil War - 1,210 words
    Civil War Small battles to big battles, no matter where it was fought, many of our soldiers died, for there side. There were many problems that lead to the Civil War. One issue was the spread of slavery to the west (the territory where they won from the Mexican War). The South claim that the slaves where properties and wanted to take there properties with them. The North didn't want that to happen. Also they wanted to make new states into slaves states and some into free states. Since they couldn't compromise there where conflicts between the two sides. The South wanted to break away from the states and make its own country. So then they declared war. The North wanted to fight because they k ...
    Related: civil war, free will, american history, emancipation proclamation, wound
  • Clarence Earl Gideon Was Charged In A Florida State Court With Having Broken And Entered A Poolroom With Intent To Commit A M - 365 words
    Clarence Earl Gideon was charged in a Florida state court with having broken and entered a poolroom with intent to commit a misdemeanor. Appearing in court without funds and without a lawyer, Gideon asked the Florida state court to appoint counsel for him, whereupon the following troubles took place. The only way Gideon would be appointed a lawyer if it was a capitol offense. After his conviction, Gideon filed in the Supreme Court of Florida the present habeas corpus petition, attacking his conviction on the grounds that his federal constitutional rights were violated by the trial court's refusal to appoint counsel. The court, without opinion, denied relief. After going back to trial the Sup ...
    Related: clarence, earl, florida, florida state, gideon, intent, state court
  • Crucible Tale Of Trials - 1,198 words
    Crucible Tale Of Trials A political cartoon shows a massive stone wall surrounding tall office buildings which bear labels of "Department of Energy," "Defense Department," "National Security Agency," "CIA," and "FBI." Outside the wall, which is tagged "Government Secrecy," a couple huddles in a roofless hut called "Personal Non-Privacy." At the top of the cartoon is printed "Somehow I feel this is not the way the founders planned it." Indeed, America's founding fathers most likely did not plan for the United States to be governed in such a manner that the people of its democracy would feel debunked. How, then, did the United States since its founding in 1776 come to this feeling of exposure? ...
    Related: crucible, salem witch trials, tale, the crucible, witch trials
  • Cyber Porn - 1,583 words
    Cyber Porn Imagine a place where you have access to anything and everything one could want. Some would say that is only existent in a utopia, and some would say that describes the Internet. Many adults go on to the net and access pornographic material that would be unsuitable for children. This is called cyberporn. The controversy lies in the fact that children are accessing these materials also. Government, activist groups, and concerned parents are fighting to regulate obscene material found over the Internet to protect children. The first amendment is the only thing protecting adults from losing their rights to obtain pornographic or indecent material on the net. Under the first amendment ...
    Related: cyber, porn, newt gingrich, vanity fair, diversity
  • Cyber Porn - 1,569 words
    ... our economy can not say no to (Rosen 15). "There are means of controlling material that parents do not want their kids to view (Levy 21)." Several devises already exist for parents that will help them filter out what they do not want their children to see. Surfwatch, a software package, allows parents to have a list of forbidden sites that can not be reached. It also always parents to program it to watch for any kind of obscene language (Miller and Mauro 85). PICS are rating and filtering technology. Parents or a third party can set up a self-censor program to their values for any document online that is PICS compatible. This always each household to censor out information found to be of ...
    Related: cyber, porn, supreme court, constitutional rights, parent
  • Dna Profiling - 1,264 words
    DNA Profiling Genetic engineering has developed and blossomed at a frightening rate in the last decade. Originating as merely an area of interest for scientists, genetic engineering has now become an area of which all people should be somewhat knowledgeable. DNA profiling has many uses, both positive and negative, in our society. Aside from its usefulness in many legal investigations, DNA profiling can be used in the workplace to discriminate against employees whose profiles could pose a financial risk. For example, genetic technology can and has been used to determine the capacity of a person to contract certain diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia, which could cause many employers to hesit ...
    Related: dna profiling, profiling, criminal investigations, federal government, jury
  • Ethics Of Death Penalty - 1,436 words
    Ethics Of Death Penalty Throughout the ages, the death penalty has been used as one of the severe ways to punish or deter people from breaking all range of laws from petty theft to murder; and many times as to set forth an example of a consequence when an individual betrays communal entity such as nationality and kindred. Evidently, the capital punishment is the ultimate punishment, for the determined offender is given no opportunity of repentance or rehabilitation. Over the years in the United States, the standards for sentencing the ultimate punishment has changed. The constitutionality of the death penalty is a highly controversial issue leading to seemingly circular arguments. Both the p ...
    Related: death penalty, death sentence, ethics, penalty, ultimate punishment
  • Farewell To Manzanar - 1,448 words
    Farewell To Manzanar In spring of 1942, immediately after the United States entered war with Japan, the Federal government instructed a policy where hundreds of thousands of people of Japanese ancestry were evacuated into relocation camps. Many agree that the United States government was not justified with their treatment towards the Japanese during World War II. This Japanese-American experience of incarceration is believed to be unconstitutional, demonstrating racism and causing social and economic hardships for the evacuees. The location of one of the camps in California, Manzanar, "was representative of the atmosphere of racial prejudice, mistrust, and fear, that resulted in American cit ...
    Related: farewell, farewell to manzanar, manzanar, agricultural production, racial prejudice
  • Farewell To Manzanar - 983 words
    Farewell To Manzanar I decided to read, Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston. This book is about the Japanese internment camps that were set up in America during World War II, and how it affected this particular family. It tells the story of the separation of the family members, hardships, and hatred that they had to live with during this time period. It also helps to open our eyes to the irony of the whole situation, and how our government can contradict themselves over some of the issues we were fighting for. The book tells the story from Jeanne Wakatsuki, the main character, point of view, and how she and her family struggled to make it through this time p ...
    Related: farewell, farewell to manzanar, manzanar, constitutional rights, world war ii
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