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  • The Fall Of Constantinople - 674 words
    THE FALL OF CONSTANTINOPLE THE FALL OF CONSTANTINOPLE On Tuesday, May 29 1453 the last bastion on Christianity in the East, Constantinople, fell to the Ottoman Turks led by Sultan Mehmet ( also called Mahomet ). This ended the 1100 year reign of the Byzantium Empire and gave the Ottomans a new capital. One of the most famous churches in history, the Church of Holy Wisdom ( also known as the Hagia Sophia ) was converted into a Mosque. The Turks used a revolutionary weapon in the siege - the cannon. Though the cannon had been in Europe for over a century, this was one of the first times they were used effectively. The Turkish army would not have been able to capture Constantinople had they not ...
    Related: constantinople, byzantine empire, ottoman turks, the prince, massive
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,507 words
    A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, & Christianity Religion is one of the driving forces behind many of the events and attitudes that have shaped our world. Throughout the centuries, laws have been enacted; cities and countries have been created and destroyed; and wars have been fought, all to promulgate or protect one religion or another. This paper will examine aspects of the three major Western religions of the world: Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Topics covered will include the origin of all three religions, the view of God held by each tradition, and conflicts. Several of the beliefs of these religions will be examined, such as judgment, and the Trinity. Origin of Judaism The origins of ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, christianity religion, comparison, great religions
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,589 words
    ... from their homes. Much persecution of Jews by Christians has been justified by the belief that the Jews were responsible for the death of Christ. In Nazi Germany and after the fall of the Third Reich, many Germans said that even though what happened to the Jews of Europe during World War Two was horrible, they did bring it on themselves because they were responsible for the death of Jesus. The Christian/Muslim conflicts began during the seventh century CE, with the fall of the Byzantine cities in Egypt and the Holy Land within ten years of the death of Muhammad. "Europeans watched in horror as the Holy Lands became Muslim and the "infidel" advanced into Spain" (Fisher, p.382). This Euro ...
    Related: christianity, comparison, great western, human beings, dependence
  • A History Of Christianity In Egypt - 1,135 words
    ... s the Thracian) however, responded by increasing persecutions in his territory of Egypt. The story is told that once before the Battle of Milvian Bridge (by which Constantine took complete control of the Western Empire) when the odds were greatly against him, Constantine beseeched God for help, praying in the Christian fashion, and won the day. He later adopted the Chi-Rho, a stylized monogram of the first letters of "Christus," as his standard, and led his armies to victory after victory. Because of this, Constantine was even more well-disposed towards the Christians, though he himself was not baptized a Christian until his deathbed. In 313 together with Licinius, the eastern Augustus, ...
    Related: christianity, egypt, history, asia minor, holy land
  • Attila The Hun Is Known As One Of The Most Ferocious Leaders Of Ancient Times He Was Given The Nickname Scourge God B - 1,348 words
    Attila the Hun is known as one of the most ferocious leaders of ancient times. He was given the nickname "Scourge God" because of his ferocity. During the twentieth century, "Hun" was one of the worst name you could call a person, due to Attila. The Huns were a barbaric and savage group of people, and Attila, their leader, was no exception. He was the stereotypical sacker of cities and killer of babies. The Huns lasted long after their disappearance in mythology and folklore, as the bad guy. Generally, they were not fun people to be around. Priscus saw Attila the Hun at a banquet in 448. Priscus described him as being a short, squat man with a large head and deep-set eyes. He also had a flat ...
    Related: ancient times, attila the hun, scourge, eastern roman, fall apart
  • Berbers In North Africa - 1,894 words
    Berbers In North Africa The modern-day region of Maghrib - the Arab West consisting of present-day Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia - is inhabited predominantly by Muslim Arabs, but it has a large Berber minority. North Africa served as a transit region for peoples moving toward Europe or the Middle East. Thus, the region's inhabitants have been influenced by populations from other areas. Out of this mix developed the Berber people, whose language and culture, although pushed from coastal areas by conquering and colonizing Carthaginians, Romans, and Byzantines, dominated most of the land until the spread of Islam and the coming of the Arabs. The purpose of this research is to examine the influen ...
    Related: africa, north africa, north african, atlantic ocean, cave paintings
  • Bosnia - 1,278 words
    Bosnia annon The origin of the arms with the argent between 6 fleur-de-lys, which is now on the flag of the republic of Bosnia-Hercegovina, has long puzzled me, but they are in fact the arms of the Kotromanic family, which ruled Bosnia in the 14th and 1 5th centuries. Other arms have also been attributed to Bosnia in the 19th century. I finally thought of a way to get at this question of the origin of the current Bosnian flag: numismatics, of course. I found a book by one Ivan Rengjeo, Corpus der mittel-alterlichen Mnzen von Kroatien, Slavonien, Dalmatien und Bosnien, Graz, 1959, which is as exhaustive as you can get on the topic (coins from those regions, that is). I have also consulted an ...
    Related: bosnia, royal family, roman empire, holy roman empire, arts
  • Bubonic Plague - 577 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic Plague, or Black Death, had many negative as well as positive effects on medieval Europe. While being one of the worst and deadliest diseases in the history of the world, it indirectly helped Europe break grounds for some of the basic necessities for life today. The Black Death erupted in the Gobi Desert in the late 1320s, but one really knows why. The plague bacillus was alive and active long before that; as Europe itself had suffered an epidemic in the 6th century. But the disease had lain relatively dormant in the succeeding centuries. It is believed that the climate of Earth began to cool in the 14th century, and perhaps this so-called little Ice Age had someth ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, positive effects, cairo egypt
  • By 1978 The Thirtyyear War That Had Been Fought Between Egypt And Israel Had Come To A Point Where There Was A Chance For Pea - 1,670 words
    By 1978 the thirty-year war that had been fought between Egypt and Israel had come to a point where there was a chance for peace. The area that had been at the center of the turmoil was the West Bank of the Jordan River and the Gaza Strip. The problem was that both countries believed that they had the rights to this land: Israel, biblically and Egypt, politically. So an invitation by President Jimmy Carter to President Anwar Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel was extended. The invitation was for a meeting in the Catoctin Mountains of Maryland at the presidential retreat, Camp David. The meeting was so that the framework of a peace agreement, known as the Camp David Ac ...
    Related: egypt, israel, main point, middle east, west bank
  • Byzantine Empire - 1,969 words
    Byzantine Empire The greatest of medieval civilizations was the Eastern Roman Empire. The Roman Empire was divided in 395. The Western half, ruled from Rome, was ruled by the barbarians in the 5th century. The Eastern half, known as the Byzantine Empire, lasted for more than over 1,000 years. The Byzantine Empire was one of the leading civilizations in the world. In 324, Constantine, the first Christian emperor, became the single ruler of the Roman Empire. He set up his Eastern headquarters at the ancient Greek colony of Byzantium in 330. This city, later renamed Constantinople, was also known as new Rome. It became the capital of the Byzantines after the Roman Empire was divided. Constantin ...
    Related: byzantine, byzantine art, byzantine empire, empire, roman empire
  • Candide By Voltaire 1694 1778 - 1,727 words
    Candide by Voltaire (1694 - 1778) Candide by Voltaire (1694 - 1778) Type of Work: Satirical novel Setting Europe and frontier South America; mid-eighteenth century Principal Characters Candide, a naive young man Pangloss,Candide's tutor and philosopher friend Cunegonde, the beautiful daughter of a baron Cacambo, Candide's servant and companion Martin, a later traveling companion Story Overveiw Candide, the illegitimate son of a Baron's sister, was sent to live with the Baron at his beautiful castle in Westphalia. The Baroness weighed about three hundred and fifty pounds, as therefore greatly respected, and did the honors of the house it had digniy which rendered her still more respect. Her d ...
    Related: candide, voltaire, self defense, eighteenth century, satisfied
  • Cavalry - 1,233 words
    Cavalry Medieval Calvary Throughout time horses have played an important role in society. Since their first introduction, they have continued to prove that they are a valuable asset. The horse fulfilled this role durning the middle ages to almost a key, in both personal and state affiars. It was in state affairs during the middle ages that the Cavalry rose to become an important part of the battle stratagies of medieval commanders. The unit of choice went from Northren Europes intialy based infantry system into a largely dependent cavalary based system. During the cavalarys rain as quaterback of the medieval battlefield, it did not go through untouched, but took some setbacks from certian co ...
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  • Christian And Byzantine Art - 722 words
    Christian And Byzantine Art Early Christian and Byzantine art started after Jesus death in the first century ranging and ending to the fourth century AD. The art produced during this period was secretive because Christianity was not a formal religion but as a cult; the Romans and rest of Europe persecuted Christians so the artist disguised their work with symbols and hints of Christian aspects. Christianity was the first cult to not involve rituals of sacrifice of animals and refused to worship an Emperor causing the Roman Empire to make Christianity illegal. Byzantine art excelled in the Justinian period in the east during 520-540 AD. The art was produced in Ravenna, Byzantine, Venice, Sici ...
    Related: byzantine, byzantine art, christian, christian art, early christian
  • Christian Muslim Conflict - 1,634 words
    Christian Muslim Conflict The conflict between the Christians and the Muslims, between 1098 and 1229, was the result of political unrest; which was fueled the Muslims migrating into the Christian holy lands, lead by Pope Urban II and carried on, throughout latter centuries by his followers. What follows is a story of war, holy visions,unholy alliances, promises made with fingers crossed, sieges and slaughters, the details of which fill volumes. Christianity, in its infancy, was a very threatened state. It was enriched with radical ideas that called for the worship of a single god in place of the many dieties that had ruled for centuries before. These radical concepts took a while to sink in ...
    Related: christian, muslim, civil war, legal status, luxury
  • Christology - 1,127 words
    Christology Christology 'In relation to the humanity, he is one and the same Christ, the son, the Lord, the Only Begotten, who is to be acknowledged in two natures, without confusion, without change, without division and without separation.' - Creed of Chalcedon (A.D. 451) For thousands of years the true nature of Jesus Christ has been widely debated. Christology is the theology devoted to studying the human and divine natures and roles of Jesus Christ. Many interpretations and viewpoints have been formed and disputed since the death of Christ up to present times. Three major councils were organized to discuss the teachings and understandings of Jesus early in the first millennium. The discu ...
    Related: christology, bible says, encarta online, jesus christ, gary
  • Christopher Columbus - 1,172 words
    Christopher Columbus In 1451, a boy named Christopher Columbus (See Appendix A), who was born in Genoa, became a sailor and discoverer of a new continent. He spoke Castilian with a little Portuguese. Although he received little education, he worked with his father, who was a weaver and had a wine shop. During Columbus' youth, he sailed in between his looming duties, shipping and receiving wool and wine for his father. When Columbus was in his twenties, he joined other exporting fleets, traveling around Spain, to England, Portugal, the Mediterranean Sea, and to West Africa (see Appendix B). In his youth he wanted to find easier ways to trade. Columbus thought of reaching Asia by sailing West. ...
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  • Compare Contrast Religion - 1,755 words
    Compare Contrast Religion ************************************************** ************************ ***** Joe Stas This was an A essay! ************************************************** ************************ ***** Compare and Contrast essay: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism Introduction of Religions Christianity most widely distributed of the world religions, having substantial representation in all the populated continents of the globe. Its total membership may exceed 1.7 billion people. Islam, a major world religion, founded in Arabia and based on the teachings of Muhammad, who is called the Prophet. One who practices Islam is a Muslim. Muslims follow the Koran, the written revelation ...
    Related: compare, compare & contrast, compare and contrast, contrast, religion
  • Constantine The Great - 724 words
    Constantine The Great Constantine Constantine was one of the best known of the Roman emperors. Some important events of his reign include the Edict of Milan, which ended the persecution of Christians and made their worship legal, the battle of the Milvian Bridge, and the completion of the political and economic reforms that begun under Diocletian. Constantine was born in Naissus in Serbia. The date of his birth is not certain, being giving as early as 274 and as late as 288. His father Constantius was a member of an important Roman family. His mother, Helena, was the daughter of an innkeeper. When his father had become Casear of Gaul and Britain, he sent his son to the Eastern Emperor Galeri ...
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  • Constantine The Great Mini Biography - 357 words
    Constantine The Great - Mini Biography Constantine the Great - mini biography by Justin Woodson Throughout history there are pivotal men and women whose actions are so significant that looking back history may have been unrecognizably different without them. These men and women can be tremendously virtuous or tremendously evil (or somewhere in between). yet their mark on history is indelible. Names of such people include Attila the Hun, Adol-ph Hitler, Abraham Lincoln, Napoleon Bonaparte, and many more. For this article I'll focus on Con-stantine the Great (ruled 307-337 AD), or more for-mally, Imperator Caesar Flavius Constantinus Pius Felix Invictus Augustus (whew. a mouthful). One of Cons ...
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  • Constantine Was Born At Naissus In The Province Of Moesia Superior On February 27, 272 Or 273 Constantius, Constantine's F - 1,029 words
    Constantine was born at Naissus in the province of Moesia Superior on February 27, 272 or 273. Constantius, Constantine's father, was a military officer. Constantine's mother's name was Helena and was known to be a humble person. Throughout his life, Constantine proved himself to the Roman people. On March 1st of 293, he exceeded the rank of Caesar. Shortly after, he married Theodora, the daughter of Maximian. When Diocletian retired on May 1st of 305, Constantine made the rank of Augustus. In 306, when Constantine's father Constantius Chlorus died, Constantine was announced Augustus by his troops at York. Galerius (Constantine's opponent) refused to accept Constantine. This didn't last long ...
    Related: constantine, province, military officer, second battle, dwellers
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