Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: consonant

  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,286 words
    Adolf Hitler ADOLF HITLER Rob Moffitt Mrs. Flinn CP Enlish 10 April 16, 2000 1. Hitlers Early Life 2. Hitlers World War I Service 3. Free Corps 4. Weimar Republic 5. German Workers Party 6. Munich Putsch 7. Mein Kampf 8. Hitlers Rise to Power 9. Hitler Launches the War 10. Hitlers Last Days The interesting life of Adolf Hitler is not fully known to people. Adolf Hitler was born on April 20, 1889, the fourth child of Alois Schickelgruber and Klara Hitler in the Austrian town of Braunau. Two of his siblings died from diphtheria when they were children, and one died shortly after birth. Alois was a customs official, illegitimate by birth, which was described by his housemaid as a very strict bu ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, franz ferdinand, early life
  • American Indians - 929 words
    American Indians Indians in eastern North America possessed no alcohol at the beginning of the colonial period. By 1800, so much alcohol flowed through the Indian villages east of the Mississippi that each community were forced to decide to take it or not and they made a tragic choice by taking it because it destroyed their cultural. The Indians who drank did so to the point of intoxication enjoyed the experience they got from it. If Indians chose to drink out of frustration and despair, they were not alone; as social scientists have made clear, whenever Western societies undergo periods of rapid transition, rates of drinking increase. Documentary evidence also suggests that some Indians enj ...
    Related: american, american indians, documentary evidence, southern states, transition
  • Analysis Of Sea Fever By John Masefield - 1,167 words
    Analysis of "Sea Fever" by John Masefield John Masefield's poem "Sea Fever" is a work of art that brings beauty to the English language through its use of rhythm, imagery and many complex figures of speech. The meter in "Sea Fever" follows the movement of the tall ship in rough water through its use of iambs and hard hitting spondees. Although written primarily in iambic meter, the meter in "Sea Fever" varies throughout the poem. The imagery in "Sea Fever" suggests an adventurous ocean that appeals to all five senses. Along with an adventurous ocean, "Sea Fever" also sets a mood of freedom through imagery of traveling gypsies. Perhaps, the most complex part of this poem is the use of personi ...
    Related: fever, figurative language, english language, poem, striking
  • Beowulf - 776 words
    Beowulf Annonymous The epic poem Beowulf, written in Old English by Christian monks around 750 AD, is a wonderful adventure story about a warrior who kills ferocious monsters. The use of description and imagery enlivens the story, making it possible for a reader to really see in his or her mind the characters and events. Metaphors, exaggeration, and alliteration are three devices that together allow the reader to experience this poem which is quite different than most other poetry. A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily means one thing is applied to another thing to suggest a likeness between the two. Metaphors are used extensively throughout the poem to p ...
    Related: beowulf, modern fiction, grendel's mother, hard facts, prince
  • Beowulf - 536 words
    Beowulf Beowulf People have been telling stories for centuries. During Anglo Saxon periods, since very few people could read or write, oral tradition was the only way people remembered, and told of dangerous stories. Transcriptions written were those done by many order of monks among those the Benedictine monk. Men in this era were brave, loyal, and a mixed group of Germanic tribes. They lived on Europe's northern seaboard and southern Scandinavia, they were known as Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and in this case, the Danes. The Danes brought about a Heroic Epic named Beowulf. Composed of kennings (hyphenated words - two meanings in one) and alliterations, which are the repeating of the consonant s ...
    Related: beowulf, men and women, anglo saxon, oral tradition, dragon
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 1,077 words
    ... earch paper. Either myself and/or my friends would be active participants in the persuasion process. The basic premise of the cognitive-dissonance theory is that when two pieces of information do not follow each other we will experience some form of psychological tension, which we will attempt to reduce in some way. Often times, according to Leon Festinger, people attempt to reduce cognitive dissonance whenever possible (Gleitman, 1983, p.12). I noticed many times that my friends were very interested in the topic of quitting their habit, and some at times took the issue personally. When people are personally involved with an issue, much like the use of tobacco, they are much more attenti ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive dissonance, dissonance, dissonance theory, developmental psychology
  • Cohen Vs Virginia - 320 words
    Cohen Vs Virginia is Cohens vs. Virginia, in which the question arose as to the right of the Supreme Court to exercise its appellate jurisdiction over the judgment of a state court involving the validity of state legislation. The contention of the counsel for the state struck at the very root of the judicial system of the Union, with its authority to review state decisions which involved the binding effect of the Federal Constitution and laws: and so to the discussion of this fundamental question Marshall brought his heaviest artillery. In a series of powerful paragraphs he proclaimed the principle of nationalism and the existence of a real union resting on the will and determination of the ...
    Related: cohen, virginia, federal constitution, supreme court, literature
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 2,643 words
    Edgar Allan Poe In the Valley of the Shodows Edgar Allan Poe was born at 33 Hollis Street, Boston, Mass., on January 19, 1809, the son of poverty stricken actors, David, and Elizabeth (born Arnold) Poe. His parents were then filling an engagement in a Boston theatre, and the appearances of both, together with their sojourns in various places during their wandering careers, are to be plainly traced in the play bills of the time. Paternal Ancestry The father of the poet was one David Poe of Baltimore, Maryland, who had left the study of the law in that city to take up a stage career contrary to the desire of his family. The Poes had settled in America some two or three generations prior to the ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, john allan
  • Emily Dickinson: A Pastiche And Explication - 1,284 words
    Emily Dickinson: A Pastiche And Explication The Original I heard a Fly buzz - when I died - I heard a Fly buzz - when I died - The Stillness in the Room Was like the Stillness in the Air - Between the Heaves of Storm - The Eyes around - had wrung them dry - 5 And Breaths were gathering firm For that last Onset - when the King Be witnessed - in the Room - I willed my Keepsakes - Signed away What portion of me be 10 Assignable - and then it was There interposed a Fly - With Blue - uncertain stumbling Buzz - Between the light - and me - And then the windows failed - and then 15 I could not see to see - A Pastiche In Troubled - Stillness did I lay, In Troubled - Stillness did I lay, Till Heaven' ...
    Related: emily, emily dickinson, explication, pastiche, make sense
  • Herman Ebbinghaus - 1,031 words
    Herman Ebbinghaus During the late 1800's a new science was emerging in Europe. Psychology's roots can be traced back to Germany and a man by the name of William Wunt. Following Wunt other psychologists began emerging in different fields. Of these pioneers Herman Ebbinghaus was one, and his field of study was memory. He performed the first experiments in 1885 in Germany and the following is a background on the man and his field. Herman Ebbinghaus was born in 1850 in Germany and died there in 1909. He received his formal education at the Universities of Bonn, Halle, and Berlin (Gale, 1996). Ebbinghaus received degrees in philosophy and history from these universities (Gale, 1996). Ebbinghaus w ...
    Related: herman, birthday party, encarta encyclopedia, over time, microsoft
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,207 words
    Human Growth And Development Human Growth and Development 1. abusive relationship: when one partner in a relationship becomes violent or aggressive toward the other. 2. accommodation: according to Piaget, changing existing knowledge based on new knowledge. 3. achievement status: identity status in which adolescents have explored alternative identities and are now secure in their chosen identities. 4. active euthanasia: deliberate ending of someones life. 5. activities of daily living (ADLs): self-care tasks such as eating, bathing, toileting, walking, or dressing. 6. activity: dimension of temperament defined by the tempo and vigor of a childs activity. 7. adaptation level: area where enviro ...
    Related: human growth, human values, life cycle, life sciences, amniocentesis
  • John Donne - 784 words
    John Donne As a young poet, John Donne often utilized metaphors of spiritual bond in many of his Songs and Sonnets in order to explain fleshly love. Once he renounced Catholicism and converted to the Anglican faith (circa 1597), Donne donned a more devotional style of verse, such as in his Holy Sonnets (circa 1609-1610), finding parallels to divine love in the carnal union. In many ways, however, his love poems and his religious poems are quite similar, for they both address his personaes deep-seated fear of isolation by women and God, respectively. For example, in "Song," Donnes speaker tells an unknown person (presumably male) that if he would "Ride ten thousand days and nights" he would r ...
    Related: donne, john donne, roman catholicism, divine love, conversion
  • Language Acquistion - 1,851 words
    Language Acquistion Language acquisition is the process of learning a native or a second language. Although how children learn to speak is not perfectly understood, most explanations involve both the observation that children copy what they hear and the inference that human beings have a natural aptitude for understanding grammar. Children usually learn the sounds and vocabulary of their native language through imitation, and grammar is seldom taught to them; that they rapidly acquire the ability to speak grammatically. This supports the theory of Noam Chomsky (1959). that children are able to learn the grammar of a particular language because all intelligible languages are founded on a deep ...
    Related: language acquisition, language development, language learning, second language, noam chomsky
  • Lexical Change In The Field Of Information Technology In The Spanish Language - 1,692 words
    Lexical Change In The Field Of Information Technology In The Spanish Language The rise of information technology is the single most important technological development of the 20th century. It has revolutionised almost every facet of modern life. Areas as diverse as stock-holding, banking, publishing and personal communication have been transformed thanks to the computer. As a result, computer jargon is one the fastest and widest-reaching areas of lexical change in Spanish, in that a whole new area of terminology has evolved. How has the Spanish language coped with this influx of new terms, for which a need had never previously existed? My main aim in this essay is to give a general survey of ...
    Related: information age, information technology, lexical, spanish, spanish language, technology
  • Music, Feelings And Arts - 2,952 words
    ... sting section of a work. In most cases, the composer eventually returns to the original key. Another important element of harmony is the cadence. This is a succession of chords that end a musical work or one of its sections. Most pieces of classical music end with a perfect cadence, which consists of a dominant chord followed by a tonic chord. A plagal cadence consists of a subdominant chord followed by a tonic chord. The Amen ending of a hymn is an example of a plagal cadence. Harmony has been a part of Western music for more than 1,000 years. However, Western composers' ideas about harmony have changed considerably over the centuries, particularly their ideas about consonance and disso ...
    Related: arts, southern united, religious music, young people, improvised
  • Nicholas G - 956 words
    Nicholas G. B.D. 5-3-82 Eighth Grade Examiner: Suzan Carter Testing Dates:7-13-97, 7-19-97, 7-23-97 The purpose of this report is to give Mr. and Mrs. G., Nicholas G.s parents, a more complete and up to date picture of Nicks academic skill levels. Nick is a neighbor of the examiner, and both parents and examinee have cherrfully volunteered Nick as testing subjuect for the examiners Diagnostic Testing class. Nicholas has been in the Special Day Class Program, attending Santa Barbara public schools since kindergarten. Nicholas is developementally delayed and has mild cerebral palsy. Nick's parents report that he has made good academic and social skills progress, especially in the past two year ...
    Related: nicholas, cerebral palsy, first grade, academic achievement, achievement
  • Red Rose - 710 words
    Red Rose Red Rose is a poem written by Robert Burns, during 1796, the year of his death. The poem consists of four stanzas; each one four lines long. The first stanza has an exact rhyme at the end of the second and fourth lines -- June and tune. The repetition of "O, my luve" in the first stanza conjures up the idea that his love is different from other men. His woman is so special to him that she reminds him of a red, red rose, not just a "plain" red rose. He uses two different similes for his love -- the rose and the melody, and "that's newly" and "that's sweetly" describing those similes. She is so young and fair that he compares her to the first rose of the season in its' purity and yout ...
    Related: dramatic monologue, robert burns, the narrator, tune, sweet
  • Reincarnation - 1,568 words
    Reincarnation Biological death is defined and accepted. Winstead- Fry points out that within sensory science, death is the termination of certain biophysical functions. "We can empirically confirm the existence and ending of life." ( 163) The criteria for brain death are accepted as proof of biological death. Of course if one considers the human being and the human body as one, then death must be a definite ending. But what about those who believes the soul never dies? There is the belief that the body is like a set of clothes the soul changes when the body gets worn out. Can the human body be considered such a worthless object? Many say no and yet others believe it truly. The debate about d ...
    Related: reincarnation, nineteenth century, human body, different views, rebirth
  • Renaissance - 588 words
    Renaissance History has shown us how civilizations evolve over time. Broadly interpreted, the age of Diocletian marked a decisive stage in the transition from the classical, the Greco-Roman, civilization of the ancient Roman Empire to the Christian-Germanic civilization of the early Middle Ages. Similarly interpreted, "the age of the Renaissance marked the transition from the civilization of the Middle Ages to the modern world"(Ferguson 1). Therefore, the Renaissance is the beginning of the modern world and modern government. In law the tendency was to challenge the abstract dialectical method of the medieval jurists with a philological and historical interpretation of the sources of Roman L ...
    Related: renaissance, renaissance culture, publishing company, middle ages, publishing
  • Short Time Recall As A Function Of Type Of Stimulus And Length Of Delay Interval - 1,687 words
    Short Time Recall As A Function Of Type Of Stimulus And Length Of Delay Interval Abstract We were interested in examining patterns of short-term information recall. We used the Brown-Peterson distractor technique to investigate the effects of stimuli type and delay interval on recall for 17 Ss. Each S was tested under 4 conditions, combined of word triads or nonsense syllables triads, with a short (10-sec) or long (45-Sec) delay interval. S read aloud the visually presented stimulus items, and aurally recalled them after the delay interval, in which S was engaged in counting backwards in threes from a presented 3-digit number. Measures were taken only for recall proportion. Results suggest a ...
    Related: delay, interval, length, recall, short term, stimulus
  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2