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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: consciousness

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  • Consciousness - 1,072 words
    Consciousness Numerous factors determine when and why you feel tired, full of energy, and hungry. A person's state of consciousness and awareness varies throughout the day and depends on a person's activity, environment, and time clock. As a human we have what is called circadian rhythms, which simply explains our daily highs and lows. An example of your basic up and down rhythm would be the sleep/wake cycle. Sunlight regulates the sleep/wake cycle by causing the suprachiasmatic nucleus to decrease its production of melatonin in the early morning and increase it in the evening. Melatonin is a hormone that if increased in blood levels makes an individual drowsy or tired and if decreased will ...
    Related: consciousness, psychedelic drugs, night terrors, sleep patterns, repeatedly
  • Consciousness And Alcohol - 749 words
    Consciousness And Alcohol Consciousness and Alcohol Why do so many people drink? Some do because they believe that it makes them more carefree and makes it easier to have a better time. People often seem to be less shy and more outgoing after a few drinks. But a few drinks can quickly turn into many. Sometimes so many that the alcohol can effect your consciousness to the point where you may experience blackouts and may even kill yourself. Alcohol has been around for at least 5000 years. Overuse of alcohol is a major problem for 10% of Americans. The focus of this study is to show what happens to your state of consciousness after a few too many drinks and the effects it has on your body and b ...
    Related: alcohol, blood alcohol, consciousness, short-term memory, central nervous
  • How Does Unconscious Differ From Consciousness - 1,008 words
    How Does Unconscious Differ From Consciousness? The QUESTION: How Does Unconscious Differ From Consciousness ? Consciousness and unconscious are two psychological terms that are commonly used in this field of study. Their importances mainly appear when psychologists deal with their patients because they will surely think about these two terms. To understand these two terms we must know their definitions. This step can enable us to recognize the difference between them. Consciousness is a psychological condition defined by the English philosopher John Locke as the perception of what passes in a man's own mind. While unconscious in psychology is the aspect of mental life that is separated from ...
    Related: consciousness, differ, unconscious, ancient times, sensory experience
  • How Does Unconscious Differ From Consciousness - 1,002 words
    ... surgery has the effect of bringing long-forgotten (unconscious) experiences back to awareness; (2) removal of specific parts of the brain seems to abolish the retention of specific experiences in memory; (3) the general probability of bringing unconscious or preconscious data to awareness is enhanced by direct electrical stimulation of a portion of the brain structure called the reticular formation, or the reticular activating system. Also, according to what is called brain blood-shift theory, the transition from unconscious to conscious activities is mediated by localized changes in the blood supply to different parts of the brain. These biopsychological explorations have shed new ligh ...
    Related: consciousness, differ, unconscious, carl jung, sigmund freud
  • Huck Finn And Jungian Collective Consciousness Unfinished - 1,011 words
    Huck Finn and Jungian Collective Consciousness (unfinished) Rachel McKinney, denim Rachs Huck Finn Paper Is Huck Finn a hero in the classical sense (i.e. Aeneas, Prometheus, Jason, etc., as well as analogous heroes from other cultures)? How does The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn both comform and deviate from Jungs macro-myth archetype? Mark Twains story The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is heralded as the "first great American novel," and has been read by generations upon generations, and translated into almost every written language. While the universal appeal of the book can be taken as a testament to Twains talent as a writer, the novel is so widely accepted for a broader reason: its f ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, collective, consciousness, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn
  • Religious Consciousness - 1,265 words
    Religious Consciousness My religious consciousness is different from my ordinary consciousness. There are a lot of actions that some people consider to be acceptable and ordinary, but religious people consider to be a sin. There are also certain objects, places, and times of the year that a non-religious person would think of as ordinary, but a some religious people would view as very special. From a Christian viewpoint, a Church is a holy place. It is thought of as the House of God. When I go to Church on Sunday, I find myself in a very religious mood. On another day of the week, Tuesday for example, I might not think of God even once all day long. When I go to Church I am thinking of how g ...
    Related: consciousness, garden city, mind and body, the bible, garden
  • States Of Consciousness - 1,079 words
    States Of Consciousness States Of Consciousness Numerous factors determine when and why you feel tired, full of energy, and hungry. A person's state of consciousness and awareness varies throughout the day and depends on a person's activity, environment, and time clock. As a human we have what is called circadian rhythms, which simply explains our daily highs and lows. An example of your basic up and down rhythm would be the sleep/wake cycle. Sunlight regulates the sleep/wake cycle by causing the suprachiasmatic nucleus to decrease its production of melatonin in the early morning and increase it in the evening. Melatonin is a hormone that if increased in blood levels makes an individual drow ...
    Related: consciousness, psychoactive drugs, psychedelic drugs, biological clock, episode
  • The Common View Of Hypnosis Is That It Is An Altered State Of Consciousness, A Trancelike State Characterized By Intense Conc - 773 words
    The common view of hypnosis is that it is an altered state of consciousness, a trance-like state characterized by intense concentration, extreme relaxation, and high suggestibility. Many who accept this view also believe that hypnosis is the way of accessing the unconscious mind, thereby allowing the recovery of repressed memories, multiple personalities, and even memories of past lives. Since at least the 1960's this view of hypnosis has been seen as a myth by scientifically-minded psychologists, who deny that hypnosis is an altered state which somehow allows the hypnotist to communicate directly with the unconscious mind. There are two distinct, though related, aspects to the mythical view ...
    Related: characterized, hypnosis, intense, good time, unconscious mind
  • The Emotional, Intellectual And Moral Orientations Of Consciousness Of The Human Person And How They Become Disorientated - 1,086 words
    The Emotional, Intellectual And Moral Orientations Of Consciousness Of The Human Person And How They Become Disorientated. Introduction Mans world is manifold, and his attitudes are manifold. What is manifold is often frightening because it is not neat or simple. Men prefer to forget how many possibilities are open to them. (Kaufmann,1970) The human person is neither simple nor neat. It is a dynamic structure with many correlated parts, some of which are still areas of mystery, intrigue and simple ignorance. Thus to try and discuss the orientations of the human person we must try to narrow our fields of examination. This is in no way ideal but Purcell in I am I love you; the human person as ...
    Related: consciousness, intellectual, moral education, moral theory, arnold schoenberg
  • The Emotional, Intellectual And Moral Orientations Of Consciousness Of The Human Person And How They Become Disorientated - 1,070 words
    ... nged, empty, and devoid of anchors to reality. You feel very much alone. You find it easier to withdraw than cope with a reality that is incongruent with your fantasy world. You feel tormented by distorted perceptions. You cannot distinguish what is real from what is unreal. Schizophrenia affects all aspects of your life. Your thoughts race and you feel fragmented and so very alone with your craziness. The anxiety felt by the patient inhibits their ability to develop genuine interpersonal relationships and often results in creation of imaginary characters. In Janices case she created a friend, whom she called the controller, that took away all her negative emotions, which enabled her to ...
    Related: consciousness, human history, intellectual, university press, personal identity
  • 5 Page Report On Buddhism - 1,433 words
    5 page report on buddhism To begin this report, I will relate the story of the Buddha. Once a king had a son, his wife dying during labor. The childs name was Siddartha (meaning all wishes fulfilled) Gautama. As the boy grew up, there was a hermit who lived near the castle who saw a shimmering about the castle grounds. Taking this as an omen, the hermit went to the castle. When he saw Siddartha, he foretold that if Siddartha stayed in the palace until he was an adult, he would be a great ruler. But if Siddartha were to leave the palace and go into the world before he was mature, he would become the Buddha and save us all. At first the king was delighted to hear this news. But gradually, he b ...
    Related: buddhism, eightfold path, right effort, western culture, difficulty
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • A Bird In The House - 1,007 words
    A Bird In The House The Position of women in the 1930's and 1940's is an important part of understanding the story, A bird in the house. Women made great strides in the twenties, gaining the right to vote, Among other statutory rights. This seemed to be the beginning of the idea that women were indeed afforded the same rights and priveliges as men1. Perhaps planting the first seeds of a liberated consciousness. Amelia Earhart became the first woman to complete the atlantic crossing single-handed. Feats of this magnitude opened the door for many other women to follow their dreams. The women in this novel represent three generations of Canadian women, In the 1930's to 40's. Their views all dif ...
    Related: bird, different types, canadian women, amelia earhart, deceptive
  • A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar - 1,215 words
    A Brave New World And 1984 Dissimilar A Brave New World and 1984 Dissimilar Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxleys A Brave New World and George Orwells 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, dissimilar, real world, world history
  • A Call To Arms Style And Tone - 525 words
    A Call to Arms - Style and Tone A Call to Arms - Style and Tone "After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain" (332). This last line of the novel gives an understanding of Ernest Hemingway's style and tone. The overall tone of the book is much different than that of The Sun Also Rises. The characters in the book are propelled by outside forces, in this case WWI, where the characters in The Sun Also Rises seemed to have no direction. Frederick's actions are determined by his position until he deserts the army. Floating down the river with barely a hold on a piece of wood his life, he abandons everything except Catherine and lets the river take him to ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell to arms, tone, stream of consciousness, love story
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Contrast Of A Brave New World And 1984 - 1,292 words
    A Comparison Contrast of A Brave New World and 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more compr ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, comparison, contrast, real world, world history
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
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