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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: compulsive disorder

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  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,466 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Obsessive Compulsive Disorder- pg. 1 Introduction and Thesis Introduction When I was young, I used to constantly hum one solitary note every few seconds or minutes throughout the day. I also used to glide the tips of my fingers right behind my ear just so I could be assured that my hair was in place. It was almost impossible to avoid. I was continually asked the question, "why do you do that," from my classmates and friends. It was sometimes embarrassing. Then one day, my "habit" disappeared. Today, my cousin R.J. coughs for no reason every minute. My friend Brian V. constantly picks his rear end, only when driving, thinking he's playing it off. I'm always told ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,388 words
    ... ng and waning course. That is, symptoms may get somewhat better for months or even years, only to get worse again before returning to a lower level of severity. "Only about 5 to 10 percent of OCD sufferers enjoy a spontaneous remission in which all symptoms of OCD go away for good (Wayne K. Goodman, MD, University of Florida Brain Institute, 1999). Another 5 to 10 percent experience progressive deterioration in their symptoms." Stress can make OCD worse, but trying to eliminate all stress is unlikely to quell OCD. In fact, it is better for most people with OCD to keep busy. Idleness can be the breeding ground for increased obsessional thinking. Changes in the severity of OCD may be relat ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 760 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual defines obsessions and compulsions as follows; Obsessions are persistent ideas, thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced as intrusive and inappropriate and that cause marked anxiety or distress. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental acts (e.g., praying, counting, repeating words silently) the goal of which is to prevent or reduce anxiety or distress, not to provide pleasure or gratification. The Symptoms associated with OCD are severe and easily recognizable. One generally accepted causes of OCD is stress. Stress is a term used by many, is somewhat misunderstood, an ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 450 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an illness that traps people in endless cycles of repetitive thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions). Although we all have habits and routines that help us organize our daily lives, people with OCD develop patterns of behavior that take up too much time and interfere with their daily lives. Obsessions are unwanted and intrusive ideas, images and impulses that run through the person's mind over and over again. Sometimes these thoughts come only once in a while and are only mildly annoying, but at other times the thoughts come constantly and cause great distress. A compulsion is a behavior that is performed on purpo ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,780 words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Are you the type of person who has a phobia of germs, dirt, or contaminated bodily fluids? Is the only way to feel safe and pure is for you to cleanse yourself countless times a day? Or maybe you`re the type of person who has to check things twice, three times or more. Perhaps you`re the type of person who has to do everything twice, or by a fixed number. Maybe you are the type of person who must have everything neatly placed, and if misplaced at all you throw a tantrum. If you are a person who happens to do any of these things then maybe you have OCD, the acronym for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (formerly known as obsessive neuro ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, compulsive, compulsive behavior, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Anorexia - 670 words
    Anorexia In today's society, we often hear of people who suffer daily from illnesses such as cancer, AIDS, obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, tuberculosis, downs syndrome and many other types of illness both communicable and non-communicable. What about the illness that consumes the life of over eight million Americans, 90% being women? "Anorexia nervosa, in medicine a condition characterized by intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, as well as a distorted body image, leading to an excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and excessive exercise. Anorexia nervosa is not associated with any preexisting physical illness. It is found chiefly in adolescents, especially y ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, obsessive compulsive disorder, sports medicine, distorted
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,685 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Eating disorders are a cause for serious concern from both a psychological and a nutritional point of view. They are often a complex expression of underlying problems with identity and self concept. These disorders often stem from traumatic experiences and are influenced by society`s attitudes toward beauty and worth (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Biological factors, family issues, and psychological make-up may be what people who develop eating disorders are responding to. Anyone can be affected by eating disorders, regardless of their socioeconomic background (Eating Disorder Resource Center, 1997). Anorexia nervosa is one such disorder characterized by extreme we ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, body image, serious concern
  • Attention Deficit Disorder - 1,480 words
    Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit Disorder Five year old Danny is in kindergarten. It is playtime and he hops from chair to chair, swinging his arms and legs restlessly, and then begins to fiddle with the light switches, turning the lights on and off again to everyone's annoyance--all the while talking nonstop. When his teacher encourages him to join a group of other children busy in the playroom, Danny interrupts a game that was already in progress and takes over, causing the other children to complain of his bossiness and drift away to other activities. Even when Danny has the toys to himself, he fidgets aimlessly with them and seems unable to entertain himself quietly. To many, ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, compulsive disorder, conduct disorder, defiant disorder, deficit, deficit disorder
  • Bipolar Disorder In Kids - 1,604 words
    Bipolar Disorder In Kids Determining Bipolar Disorder in children is harder then adults because of the mistakes doctor's make in their diagnosis. All kids have mood swings - is it Bipolar Disorder? Psychologists of today are having problems diagnosing children with Bipolar Disorder because the symptoms are so different from the adult form of the disorder. In children Bipolar Disorder is called "Child Onset Bipolar Disorder", known as COBPD (My Child 1). In children the cycling from highs to lows are very fast. Children will cycle between mania and depression many times a day. The episodes of mania or depression are short and rarely go on for more then a day at a time (Childhood 1). Children ...
    Related: affective disorder, anxiety disorder, attachment disorder, attention deficit disorder, bipolar, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder
  • Breaking Up - 1,044 words
    ... ly, Tom got angry and told Christine to stay away from his family. As it turned out, Christine never followed through on her threats. They were just an underhanded ploy to make Tom upset. This is not a mature way of handling a breakup, which is true for most teenage heartbreak. Another incorrect method of recovery is harassment due to obsession. The harasser is the person who, for example, is obsessed with driving by the exs house or place of work, calls the other just to hear his or her voice and tries to cover it up with lies like, I was just in the neighborhood, and I think I dialed the wrong number... The severity of the obsession is measured by the time that is spent on it, the degr ...
    Related: teenage suicide, family member, physical abuse, infatuation, depending
  • Causes, Symptoms, Complications And Treatments For The Eating Disorder Anorexia Nervosa - 1,303 words
    Causes, Symptoms, Complications And Treatments For The Eating Disorder Anorexia Nervosa. Causes, Symptoms, Complications and Treatments for the eating disorder Anorexia Nervosa. Eating disorders are devastating behavioral maladies brought on by a complex interplay of factors, which may include emotional and personality disorder, family pressure, a possible genetic or biological susceptibility and a culture in which there is an over abundance of food and an obsession with thinness. Eating disorders are generally characterized as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and eating disorders not other wise specified. According to the World of Psychology anorexia is defined as an eating disorder charac ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, binge eating, bulimia nervosa, compulsive disorder, disorder, eating disorder
  • Howard Hughes - 1,896 words
    ... played, and went on to appear on screens for over 20 years throughout the world. In the end, it brought in just over eight million dollars, roughly twice Hughess investment. Bored with the movies and having proven himself, it was time for Hughes to move on to something more exciting. In the summer of 1932, Howard Hughes took a job with American Airlines under the name Charles Howard. His salary was $250 a week, an excellent wage during the great depression (unless youre already a millionaire.) Hughes masqueraded in this position for two months, carrying baggage, talking to passengers and working as a co-pilot for the commercial airline. In the late summer of 1932, Hughes left American A ...
    Related: howard, howard hughes, hughes, hotel management, compulsive disorder
  • John D Rockefeller: Obsession Into Success - 1,249 words
    John D. Rockefeller: Obsession Into Success John D. Rockefeller, the Standard Oil magnate who, by the time of his death in 1937, was probably worth close to a billion dollars, is perhaps one of the best historical examples of an obsessive-compulsive. An obsessive-compulsive is one who is driven to an act or acts, generally being asocial, by his own fixations but by nature of his peculiar psyche must balance these actions with others more socially acceptable. There are abundant examples of Rockefeller's deeds fitting these clinical characteristics, and John D. Rockefeller is today generally regarded as an obsessive-compulsive. The roots of this disorder are traceable back to his childhood. Wh ...
    Related: john d rockefeller, obsession, civil war, order of magnitude, genius
  • Mental Disorders - 1,868 words
    Mental Disorders There are many diseases and disorders that may affect the human mind. Some of these are serious, while others are minor and may not even be noticed. Some of the disorders and diseases to be covered in this report are delirium, dementia, and schizophrenia, also a discussion of specific symptoms and treatments available for the different disorders. A mental illness is defined as any disease that affects a person's mind, thoughts, emotions, personality, or behavior. For any mental illness, as in a physical illness, there are symptoms that make it possible to identify when a person is suffering from a mental disorder or illness. Some of the more common symptoms of these disorder ...
    Related: affective disorder, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, compulsive disorder, disorders, dissociative disorders, eating disorders
  • Obedience - 1,110 words
    Obedience Psychologists, social scientists and writers have long been interested in the whys of obedience and disobedience; many experiments have been conducted to help in understanding these issues and the influences exerted by outside forces on individuals in their decision making processes. Unthinking obedience can be as dangerous as unthinking rebellion in any society, neither is done with self-reflection as a part of the process; however, care must be used in determining the appropriate time for thoughtful disobedience so that society is not destroyed by the dissention. In a short story by Shirley Jackson entitled The Lottery, reprinted in Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum (382) ...
    Related: obedience, chronic pain, decision making, general psychiatry, partial
  • Ocd - 400 words
    Ocd OCD What does three percent of our population have in common? The answer is a disorder known as Obsessive Compulsive disorder, or OCD. OCD is one of the most overlooked disorders among all mental illnesses, however it is more dominant than schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. OCD is in most cases as simple as the repetitive washing of ones hands, but in rare cases it may be as severe as feeling a need to harm someone. OCD is a undiscriminating in the sense that it equally affects men and women as well as all races and peoples regardless of economic status and cultural upbringing. The diagnosis of OCD is possible at young ages, however if not diagnosed at a young age it will become more s ...
    Related: bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, economic status, disorder
  • Ocd - 477 words
    Ocd What is Obsessive-compulsive disorder? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the anxiety disorders and is potentially disabling condition according to national institute of mental health, NIMH (2000). Individuals with OCD become trapped in a pattern of repetitive thoughts and behaviors that can be senseless and distressing but are extremely hard to over come. Such as checking things repeatedly (e.g. doors, locks and stoves), constant counting either in ones head or outwardly, etc. Most of theses obsessions are persistent fears that harm may come to self or a loved one, or an unreasonable concern with becoming contaminated, also excessive need for perfection. According to NIMH (20 ...
    Related: mental health, behavior therapy, early adult, psychology
  • Ocd Disease - 1,784 words
    OCD Disease It was 9:30 a.m., and Nancy, a 36-year-old attorney, had arrived late for work again. Nancy knew she needed to catch up on her legal assignments, but a familiar worry nagged at her. No matter how hard she tried, Nancy could not dislodge the thought that she had left a pot burning on the stove. The image of her home engulfed in flames was so vivid she could almost smell the smoke. Nancy tried to shut the thought out of her mind, reassuring herself that she had turned the gas jet off. But even remembering her hand touching the cool stove burner-a precaution she took whenever she left the house-still left her wondering whether she had checked carefully enough. The pot and stove were ...
    Related: obsessive compulsive disorder, mental illness, american psychiatric, aggressive, nancy
  • Panic Disorder - 1,212 words
    Panic Disorder The purpose of this paper is to understand Panic Disorder and symptoms, types of the disorder, treatment, and relation to other disorders and how it affects people in general. Included, is a case study of Sarah who suffered with a panic disorder. Panic Disorder is when someone experiences unexpected panic attacks followed by at least one month of persistent concern about having another panic attack, worrying about the possible consequences of the panic attacks, or a behavioral change related to the attacks (Millon, 1996, p.559). Panic Disorder is not a disease. It may be assessed, but not definitively diagnosed. This disorder is distressing and disabling, physically, psycholog ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic, panic attacks, panic disorder
  • The Identity Theory - 846 words
    The Identity Theory The identity theory, also known as reductive materialism, is one of the views Churchland uses to describe mind-brain correlation. Churchland believes that the mental states of the body are one and in the same (double aspectism) with brain states. They are the same because the biochemical actions produced in brain states (release of serotonin and acetylcholine) have direct interaction with the mental states (mood disorders such as depression). With the help of psychological and physiological evidence the identity theory can be better supported. It has not yet been proven but following along with the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of biochemical disorders of the brain t ...
    Related: identity theory, cognitive psychology, vice versa, physical activity, xanax
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