Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: compromise of 1850

  • 28 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 5 Most Influential People In American History - 1,556 words
    5 Most Influential People In American History The United Sates has had a short yet complex history in its two hundred and twenty-four years. She has produced millions and millions of great individuals. These great minds have shaped what America is today. Others, however, have personally molded this magnificent nation with their own acts. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson are the most influential builders of the United States of America. John Adams was born loyal to the English Crown but evolved into the second President of the Free World. As a lawyer, Adams emerged into politics as an opponent of the Stamp Act and was a leader in the Revolutionary gro ...
    Related: american, american congress, american history, american revolution, american system, history, influential
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
    Related: american, american identity, national identity, huckleberry finn, missouri compromise
  • American Parties From The Civil War - 1,731 words
    American Parties from the Civil War American Parties from the Civil War This essay conains American party systems from the end of George Washingtons first term as president through the Civil War. Included are the creations, the building up of, and sometimes the break down of the various parties. As well as the belief in which the parties stood for. The Origins of the Democratic Party In colonial politics tended to organize and electioneer in opposition to the policies of royal, mercantile, banking, manufacturing, and shipping interests. Agrarian interests later become a principal source of support for the Democratic Party. Many of the colonies had so-called Country parties opposing the Court ...
    Related: american, american party, american political, civil war, native american, political parties
  • Civil War Ap Paper - 940 words
    Civil War (Ap Paper) 02-23-2001 The name Civil War is misleading because the war was not a class struggle, but a sectional combat, having its roots in political, economic, social, and psychological elements. It has been characterized, in the words of William H. Seward, as the irrepressible conflict. In another judgment the Civil War was viewed as criminally stupid, an unnecessary bloodletting brought on by arrogant extremists and blundering politicians. Both views accept the fact that in 1861 there existed a situation that, rightly or wrongly, had come to be regarded as insoluble by peaceful means. In the days of the American Revolution and of the adoption of the Constitution, differences be ...
    Related: civil war, john c calhoun, presidential election, half free, destructive
  • Civil War In Us - 402 words
    Civil War In US The annexation of Texas to the United States and the gain of new territory by the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo aggravated the hostility between the North and South. The controversial issue of slavery in the new territories arose again along with many other political differences that needed to be resolved. In the midst of fear that the southern states might withdraw from the Union altogether, Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky created a series of five legislative enactments. These enactments, known as the Compromise of 1850, answer the question of whether slavery was to be sanctioned or prohibited in the newly acquired regions. The first two measures included the admission of Cali ...
    Related: civil war, henry clay, final solution, kansas nebraska, senator
  • Constitution - 1,417 words
    Constitution When the Constitution of the United States was first created in 1787, its purpose was to unify our country. However, by 1850, the United States had become 'source of sectional discord and tension and ultimately contributed to the failure of the union it had created.' What happened during the 63 years after it was first established to 'contribute to the failure of the union it had created?' One must look at what the Constitution promoted to make the country unified and what it did to make it disunified. Compromises such as 3/5, the Missouri, and the tariff of 1850 all helped to unify and shape our country. However, compromises such as the Fugitive Slave Law, Popular Sovereignty, ...
    Related: constitution, three-fifths compromise, political power, fair trial, strict
  • Constitution - 1,401 words
    ... to resist the reenslaving a man on the coast of America.' In the flyer created by an abolitionist, it pointed out that man was able to capture free or runaway slaves' to be on the lookout. This flyer had no right to allow whites to kidnap a man due to the color of his skin, free or runaway. Transcendentalists such as Emerson and Thoreau, both supported a variety of reforms, especially the antislavery movement. Emerson's essays argued for self-reliance, independent thinking and the primacy of spiritual, matters over material ones. Thoreau used observations of nature to discover essential truths about life and the universe. The Fugitive Slave Law is definitely a reason why the Constitutio ...
    Related: constitution, runaway slaves, compromise of 1850, white house, determining
  • Daniel Webster - 693 words
    Daniel Webster Daniel Webster contributed a large potion of the Civil War. To begin, he was born in Salisbury, New Hampshire on January 18, 1782. His parents were farmers so many people didn't know what to expect of him. Even though his parents were farmers, he still graduated from Dartmouth College in 1801. After he learned to be a lawyer, Daniel Webster opened a legal practice in Portsmouth, New Hampshire in 1807. Webster quickly became an experienced and very good lawyer and a Federalist party leader. In 1812, Webster was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives because of his opposition to the War of 1812, which had crippled New England's shipping trade. After two more terms in the H ...
    Related: daniel, daniel webster, house webster, webster, annexation of texas
  • Famouse People Of Civil War - 1,160 words
    ... ng marches. In late 1864 he spread out his men 50 miles wide and attacked the Confederacy on the unprotected Georgia countryside. It resulted in the capture of Savannah. In 1881 Sherman established the famous school at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and he died in 1891. Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass was born a slave in Maryland in 1817. In 1838 he obtained seaman's papers from a free black and escaped to New Bedford. In 1841 he joined the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. With Douglass's great speeches, people didn't believe that he used to be a slave. Douglass wrote a book called Life and Times of Frederick Douglass to tell people about his life when he was a slave. After 2 years o ...
    Related: black people, causes of the civil war, civil war, united states civil, mississippi river
  • Millard Fillmore - 1,222 words
    Millard Fillmore Millard Fillmore Fillmore, Millard (1800-1874), 13th president of the United States (1850-1853) and the second vice president to finish the term of a deceased president. He succeeded Zachary Taylor at a critical moment in United States history. The Mexican War (1846-1848) had renewed the conflict between the Northern and Southern states over slavery, since it had added new territories to the United States. The debate over whether these territories should be admitted as free or slave states precipitated a crisis that threatened civil war. Much to the relief of Northern and Southern politicians, Fillmore pursued a moderate and conciliatory policy. He signed into law the Compro ...
    Related: millard, millard fillmore, southern states, national convention, county
  • Millard Fillmore - 1,168 words
    ... ssissippi, and Senator John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. Angry words figuratively rocked the Senate hall, as they did the chamber of the House of Representatives. Although President Taylor was a Louisiana slaveholder, he leaned more toward Seward's antislavery views. Determined to uphold the Constitution of the United States, the president threatened to send federal troops to protect disputed New Mexico territory from an invasion by proslavery Texans. Southerners countered that, if Taylor followed through with his threat, the act would be the signal for an armed Southern rebellion against federal power. Mississippi called for a convention to meet in June 1850 at Nashville, Tennessee, to ...
    Related: millard, millard fillmore, general hospital, party platform, faction
  • Samuel Houston - 1,085 words
    ... s imprisoned. Houston returned to law and set up his practice in Nacogdoches where he joined the Roman Catholic Church as required by Mexican law. Houston returned east, to Washington, D.C. and then New York City, to meet with his legal client, The Galveston Bay and Texas Land Company. Houston was soon named Commander-in-Chief by the Nacogdoches Committee of Vigilance. The Texas Provisional Government, on the motion of Merriweather W. Smith, named Sam Houston a Major General in the Texas Army. On January 14, 1836, Houston addresses his troops at Goliad and orders Jim Bowie to return to San Antonio and blow up the Alamo. Houston was granted a furlough from the army to travel to an Indian ...
    Related: houston, sam houston, samuel, republic of texas, union party
  • Sixteen Most Significant Events In Us History Between 1789 To 1975 - 4,278 words
    Sixteen Most Significant Events in US History between 1789 to 1975 After a review of United States' history from 1789 to 1975, I have identified what I believe are the sixteen most significant events of that time period. The attached sheet identifies the events and places them in brackets by time period. The following discussion provides my reasoning for selecting each of the events and my opinion as to their relative importance in contrast to each other. Finally, I have concluded that of the sixteen events, the Civil War had the most significant impact on the history of the time period in which it occurred and remains the most significant event in American history. The discussion begins wit ...
    Related: american history, history, significant events, significant impact, sixteen, states history, united states history
  • Slavery Is The South - 653 words
    Slavery is the South Essay #3 Slavery played a dominating and critical role in much of Southern life. In the struggle for control in America, slavery was the Souths stronghold and the hidden motive behind many political actions and economic statistics. By dominating Southern life, slavery also dominated the economic and political aspects of life in the South from 1840 to 1860. By the 1840s and 50s the Southern economy had almost completely become slave and cash crop agriculture based. Without slaves in the south a person was left either landless and penniless or struggling to get by on a small farm. However, even though slaves dominated the southern economy, slaveholders only included about ...
    Related: slavery, compromise of 1850, stephen douglas, popular sovereignty, farm
  • The American Civil War - 1,534 words
    The American Civil War The American Civil War The Civil War was a brutal war between the North and South of America over the issue of slavery, which was spurred on by the secession of the southern states from the Union of a America. At the time slavery was one of the main issues in America that caused a disagreement between the north and south and these disagreements about humanity and slaves added to the tension that would finally lead to the out break of war. Slavery was almost totally abolished in the northern states after 1787 when the Constitution was drafted at the Philadelphia Convention and slavery was looked upon as the 'peculiar institution' of the southern states, by the north. Th ...
    Related: american, american civil, american civil war, american history, civil war
  • The American Dream - 1,858 words
    The American Dream It is the intent of this paper to prove that the "American Dream" can best be explained as a "ciity upon a hill." "Ciity upon a hill" meaning being above and superior over those below. The Civil War, the imperialistic race of the 19th century, the Korean War, the KKK, and the Gulf War are all examples of the "American Dream" of superiority playing a part in American History. Each American has a different idea of this superiority, but nonetheless strive to achieve it, whatever it may be in. The Civil War which split the United States, was a clash of two aspects of approaching the "American Dream" in a young America. Both sides felt their idea's and philosophies were superio ...
    Related: american, american dream, american history, american revolution, dream, north american
  • The American Dream - 1,858 words
    The American Dream It is the intent of this paper to prove that the "American Dream" can best be explained as a "ciity upon a hill." "Ciity upon a hill" meaning being above and superior over those below. The Civil War, the imperialistic race of the 19th century, the Korean War, the KKK, and the Gulf War are all examples of the "American Dream" of superiority playing a part in American History. Each American has a different idea of this superiority, but nonetheless strive to achieve it, whatever it may be in. The Civil War which split the United States, was a clash of two aspects of approaching the "American Dream" in a young America. Both sides felt their idea's and philosophies were superio ...
    Related: american, american dream, american history, american revolution, dream, north american
  • The American Dream - 1,864 words
    The American Dream The American Dream It is the intent of this paper to prove that the American Dream can best be explained as a ciity upon a hill. Ciity upon a hill meaning being above and superior over those below. The Civil War, the imperialistic race of the 19th century, the Korean War, the KKK, and the Gulf War are all examples of the American Dream of superiority playing a part in American History. Each American has a different idea of this superiority, but nonetheless strive to achieve it, whatever it may be in. The Civil War which split the United States, was a clash of two aspects of approaching the American Dream in a young America. Both sides felt their idea's and philosophies wer ...
    Related: american, american dream, american history, american revolution, dream, north american
  • The Causes Of The Civil War - 1,443 words
    The Causes Of The Civil War The Political War The North and South fought over politics, mainly the idea of slavery. Basically the South wanted and needed it and the North did not want it at all. The South was going to do anything they could to keep it. This was the issue that overshadowed all others. At this time the labor force in the South had about 4 million slaves. These slaves were very valuable to the slaveholding planter class. They were a huge investment to Southerners and if taken away, could mean massive losses to everyone. Slaves were used in the South as helpers in the fields in the cultivation of tobacco, rice, and indigo, as well as many other jobs. The South especially needed ...
    Related: causes of the civil war, civil war, abraham lincoln, political beliefs, america
  • 28 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2