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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aids epidemic

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  • Aids Epidemic - 241 words
    Aids Epidemic The Aids epidemic continues to grow globally. According to this article "33.6 million people are expected to be living with virus this year." Also an expected 2.6 million people will die from the virus this year. This is the most people that will die from the virus since the epidemic was discovered around two decades ago. This means that one in every twenty deaths will be because of AIDS. 16.3 million people have already died from this virus. In some places in Europe and Africa, the virus has doubled in only two years. "More than half the victims are under age 25, and few will live to see their 35th birthday." Girls that are between ages 15 - 19 are five times more likely to be ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, epidemic, turning point, social issues
  • Aids Epidemic In Africa - 269 words
    Aids Epidemic In Africa My initial thought on how to solve the AIDS epidemic was to increase the amount of education and medical aid in the area. AIDS education is crucial to stop the spreading of the disease. There are myths that exist in Africa about HIV, such as "Some believe that you can rid yourself of HIV through sex with virgins, or flush it out of your system through repeated intercourse." It is obvious that the people are not aware of how the disease works. Universities such as Indiana University actually set up a program to educate people in Kenya about AIDS. Sending financial aid to Africa is a major problem. Without sufficient input, we can't save many lives. We could submit our ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, epidemic, financial aid
  • A Study Of Catholicism - 592 words
    A Study of Catholicism A Study of Catholicism When "catholic" is used as an adjective, it means universal, open or general. I have read art magazines and reviews that have described certain art collections as "catholic in its uniqueness." The fact that Catholicism has its root in the word "catholic" is not a coincidence. In his essay "Catholicism: A Synthesis," Richard McBrien says that it is this notion that distinguishes Catholicism from other religions, Christian and non. The notion is that Catholicism is a religion that is based on open-mindedness. McBrien alludes to flags to clearly define his thesis. Many flags of the world share the same three colors. He uses the colors red, white, an ...
    Related: catholicism, human beings, catholic church, young girl, awareness
  • Adam Rehrig - 1,060 words
    Adam Rehrig Mr. Gardner TV 151 Term Paper Film Noir It is world of dark rooms with light slicing through venetian blinds, alleys cluttered with garbage, abandoned warehouses where dust hangs in the air, rain-slickened streets with water still running in the gutters, dark detective officers overlooking busy streets. These are the qualities that makes film noir a perfect blend of form and content, where the desperation and hopelessness of situations is reflected in the visual style, which drenches the world in shadows and has only a few occasional bursts of sunlight. Film noir, occasionally acerbic, usually cynical, often enthralling, gives us characters trying to elude some kind of mysterious ...
    Related: adam, german expressionism, science fiction, maltese falcon, agency
  • Aids - 1,178 words
    Aids For an epidemic that would explode to claim hundreds of thousands of lives, AIDS surfaced very quietly in the United States, with a small notice on June 4, 1981 in a weekly newsletter published by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, alerting doctors to five unusual cases of pneumonia that had been diagnosed in Los Angeles residents over the previous few months. All the patients were homosexual men who had come down with PCP (Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia), a lung infection usually seen only severely malnourished children or adults undergoing intensive chemotherapy. But until they got sick the California men were well nourished, vigorous adults, whose immune systems should have ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, aids research, high blood pressure, blood cells
  • Aids - 1,146 words
    AIDS Being one of the most fatal viruses in the nation, AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) is now a serious public health concern in most major U.S. cities and in countries worldwide. Since 1986 there have been impressive advances in understanding of the AIDS virus, its mechanisms, and its routes of transmission. Even though researchers have put in countless hours, and millions of dollars it has not led to a drug that can cure infection with the virus or to a vaccine that can prevent it. With AIDS being the leading cause of death among adults, individuals are now taking more precautions with sexual intercourse, and medical facilities are screening blood more thoroughly. Even though HI ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, latin america, hepatitis b, pneumonia
  • Aids In Africa - 1,109 words
    Aids In Africa As recently as 1990, there were some regions of the world that had remained relatively unscathed by AIDS. Today, however, there is not a single country around the world which has wholly escaped the AIDS epidemic. As the epidemic has matured, some of the developed nations which were hard hit by the epidemic in the 1980s such as the United States have reported a slowing in the rate of new infections and a stabilization among existing cases with lower mortality rates and an extension of post-diagnosis lifespan. However, despite the changing face of the global AIDS pandemic, one factor remains unchanged: no region of the world bears a higher AIDS-related burden than sub-Saharan Af ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, east africa, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa, west africa
  • Aids In Africa - 1,093 words
    ... condoms and/or other barrier contraceptives, and reduced sexual frequency (Zaba & Gregson, 1998; Gregson, et al., 1999). Biological and behavioral factors among HIV+ men may also impact the fertility rates. In general, researchers have noted that biological factors, including reduced sperm count and reduced frequency of sexual activity related to physical illness, have been more important than behavioral factors (condom use, etc.) when examining males' contributions to the declining fertility rates (Zaba & Gregson, 1998). Orphanhood & Early Childhood Mortality. The data on child mortality and AIDS are more confusing. There is no doubt that AIDS has had a devastating impact on children i ...
    Related: africa, aids, aids epidemic, aids prevention, foreign aid, saharan africa, sub-saharan africa
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Birth Control Education - 1,913 words
    ... who have to tell parents that their child is pregnant or will die from the AIDS virus. This is by far not a job that they enjoy doing. They want desperately for the AIDS epidemic to be terminated, and to stop seeing so many children diagnosed with a STD and become impregnated. Like the parents, they too are taxpayers and voters, but they have one more ball in their court. They are experts in this field, and have the ability to alter peoples views by simply telling them what they see every day. These are the people the school board will call and ask the opinion of while trying to decide an appropriate course of action. Unhappily this is a minor issue to doctors, whom are faced with cance ...
    Related: birth control, drug education, education classes, education programs, education system, health education, sex education
  • Ebola Virus - 1,107 words
    ... ltifactorial nature of viral evolution makes it difficult to predict such events. According to Doolittle, retrovirus evolution is sporadic, with retroviruses evolving at different rates in different situations. For instance, the human endogenous retroviral element is shared with chimpanzees, indicating no change in over 8 million years, whereas strains of HIV have diverged in mere decades. Endogenous retroviruses carried in the germline evolve slowly compared with infective retroviruses. Generation of new viral pathogens is rare, and often possible only because of high mutation rates that permit many neutral mutations to accumulate before selective pressure forces a change. The seeming u ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, influenza virus, virus, oxford university press
  • Faderman Vs Epstein - 1,157 words
    Faderman Vs. Epstein Homosexuality is a topic that has been discussed and debated for many years. There are several different viewpoints as to the origin of homosexuality, and as to the way in which homosexuals should be treated in the general society. Two distinguished authors that discuss homosexuality and it's relation to the surrounding world are Steven Epstein and Lillian Faderman. In Epstein's article Gay and Lesbian Movements in the United States and in Faderman's book Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers there are many distinguishing characteristics between there styles of writing. Although different in style both of the writings prove to be useful in understanding the ways in which the hom ...
    Related: epstein, working class, social change, liberation front, epidemic
  • Heroin - 1,606 words
    HEROIN Abstract The use of heroin continues to climb in most areas. The number of varieties and sources of heroin available, combined with an increased domestic demand make the heroin market the fastest growing drug market reported. While there are indications of increased use of heroin among younger, suburban users, it is the cadre of older, inner-city heroin users that drive the heroin market (DEA 1996). Almost all areas report that the majority of heroin users are older drug users (over 30) who have been using for many years. However, many areas are reporting an increase in the number of new or younger users. HEROIN 3 Heroin, Its Effects and Treatment Heroin (AKA: smack, horse, mud, brown ...
    Related: heroin, heroin addiction, research institute, family medical, rock
  • Hiv - 627 words
    Hiv CURRENT EVENTS: HIVS ROOTS TRACED TO 1930 Summary Scientists have concluded, based on mathematical research, that the virus that lead to the epidemic of AIDS can be traced all the way back to 1930, somewhere around Central Africa. Bette Korber, of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, presented this conclusion at the Conference of Retroviruses. The notion that HIV was introduced in contaminated oral polio vaccines in Africa between the years of 1957 and 1961 has been often debated and challenged. The results presented by Korber, not only refute the before mentioned allegations, but also move us toward finding out where the virus really came from and in which direction it is h ...
    Related: caribbean islands, new mexico, national laboratory, institute
  • Hiv Multiple Bereavement Syndrome - 1,987 words
    Hiv & Multiple Bereavement Syndrome HIV/AIDS and Multiple Bereavement: Is the psychological impact of multiple loss intensified by social factors? "The advent of AIDS has created a new population of people who suffer multiple bereavements as well as threats to their own lives." (Murray-Parkes, 1998, p. xii) The populations most affected by HIV/AIDS live in two geographical locations: the USA and Africa (WHO, 1998) . In 1997 four million people in the Sub-Saharan Africa were newly reported as having seropositive status (WHO, 1998). In North America this figure was 44 thousand (WHO, 1998). Seropositive rates among Gay men in New York City are reported at 36 to 67% (Dean L, 1995). Infection rat ...
    Related: bereavement, multiple, syndrome, financial resources, york city
  • How Aids Has Affected Our Society - 1,238 words
    How Aids Has Affected Our Society Science - Health How Aids Has Affected Our Society Today more Americans are infected with STD's than at any other time in history. The most serious of these diseases is AIDS. Since the first cases were identified in the United States in 1981, AIDS has touched the lives of millions of American families. This deadly disease is unlike any other in modern history. Changes in social behavior can be directly linked to AIDS. Its overall effect on society has been dramatic. It is unknown whether AIDS and HIV existed and killed in the U.S. and North America before the early 1970s. However in the early 1980s, "deaths by opportunistic infections, previously observed ma ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, aids research, society today, social behavior
  • Human Disease Research - 2,361 words
    ... ical retardation. Abnormal development of any body part in a fetus may produce a congenital defect; for example, if walls that separate the chambers of the heart fail to form completely, the baby is born with congenital heart disease. BImmunological Diseases Immunological diseases occur when the immune system, which normally protects against infections, malfunctions. The most common types of immunological diseases are allergies, autoimmune diseases, and immune deficiencies. An allergy is an abnormal reaction of the immune system to foreign substances, such as plant pollen, fungal spores, animal danders, medications, and foods. Rhus dermatitis is an allergy caused by contact with urushiol ...
    Related: cardiovascular disease, disease research, heart disease, human body, human disease, human history, human population
  • Imagine Waking Up Every Morning And Knowing That You Have Been Infected With - 1,464 words
    Imagine waking up every morning and knowing that you have been infected with the AIDS virus, and could die in a couple of years. What if their was something you could do to slow the affects of the virus to live a longer life expectancy? Would you inhale a joint of marijuana, even if it was prescribed by a physician? I believe the majority of people would take the chance to live longer, especially if it meant that they could see a new smiling face each day, another pleasant cheer of laughter to be heard, and a bright colorful sunset to be seen. "Marijuana is a relatively mild, nonaddictive drug with hallucinogenic properties, obtained from the flowering tops, stems, and leaves of the hemp pla ...
    Related: infected, waking, life expectancy, aids epidemic, lethal
  • May 1987 By Martin H Goodman Md This Essay Is In The Public Domain Introduction: Aids Is A Life And Death Issue To Have The A - 1,706 words
    (May 1987) By Martin H. Goodman MD (this essay is in the public domain) Introduction: AIDS is a life and death issue. To have the AIDS disease is at present a sentence of slow but inevitable death. I've already lost one friend to AIDS. I may soon lose others. My own sexual behavior and that of many of my friends has been profoundly altered by it. In my part of the country, one man in 10 may already be carrying the AIDS virus. While the figures may currently be less in much of the rest of the country, this is changing rapidly. There currently is neither a cure, nor even an effective treatment, and no vaccine either. But there are things that have been PROVEN immensely effective in slowing the ...
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