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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: columbia

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  • Columbia And Okanagan Rivers - 728 words
    Columbia And Okanagan Rivers While searching for an accessible route to transport furs to the Pacific, Europeans began exploring the B.C. Interior. In 1811 Scottish trader and explorer David Stuart of the Pacific Fur Company sailed to the junction of the Columbia and Okanagan rivers and built Fort Okanagan. He then travelled north to Thompson River and in so doing, established the Okanagan Valley trail that united the Upper Fraser and Lower Columbia sections. By 1824 the trail was dominated by the activities of the Hudson's Bay Company which provided fur caravans along the lake hills until 1847. Between orchards and vineyards remnants of the trail remain for historical hikes. The first perma ...
    Related: columbia, rivers, long history, governor general, music
  • 100 Years Of Degradation - 1,060 words
    100 Years Of Degradation Students were assigned this essay as an inside look at oppression and racism from the last one hundred years, told by two elderly ladies in the book, Having Our Say. 100 Years of Degradation There are several books that have to be read in English 095. Having Our Say is one of them. My advice is to read this book while you are still in 090 or 094, just to get the advantage. These are some things that you will discover in this extraordinary biography. This book is tough to take as humorous, because its heart-wrenching to look at racism in America, but Having Our Say, manages to pull off the feat. Having Our Say really makes you think and tries to somehow reflect on the ...
    Related: degradation, public school system, rights movement, school teacher, negro
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • A Dream Deferred - 898 words
    A Dream Deferred A Dream Deferred What happens to a dream deferred? (a) Does it dry up (b) like a raisin in the sun? (c) Or fester like a sore- (d) And then run? (c) Does it stink like rotten meat? (e) Or crust and sugar over- like a syrupy sweet? (e) Maybe it just sags (f) like a heavy load. (g) Or does it explode? (g) Born in Joplin, Missouri, James Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was born into an abolitionist family. As the grandson of James Mercer Langston, the first Black American to be elected to public office in 1855, Hughes attended Central High School in Cleveland, Ohio, but began writing poetry in the eighth grade, and was selected as Class Poet. His father didn't think he would be abl ...
    Related: deferred, dream, dream deferred, raisin in the sun, james langston hughes
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • A Personal Information - 1,287 words
    A. Personal Information Arthur Kornberg (1918-), American biochemist and physician, claims he has never met "a dull enzyme." He has devoted his life to pursuing and purifying these critical protein molecules. His love of science did not spring from a family history rooted in science. He was born on March 3rd, 1918, the son of a sewing machine operator in the sweatshops of the Lower East Side of New York City. His parents, Joseph Aaron Kornberg and Lena Rachel Katz, were immigrant Jews who made great sacrifices to ensure the safety of their family. They had fled Poland, for if they had stayed, they would have been murdered in a German concentration camp. His grandfather had abandoned the pate ...
    Related: personal information, national institute, york city, lincoln high school, spending
  • Abe Lincoln - 1,352 words
    Abe Lincoln Abraham Lincolns assassination was a malevolent ending to an already bitter and spiteful event in American history, the Civil War. John Wilkes Booth and his group of co-conspirators developed plans in the late summer of 1864 to only kidnap the President and take him the Confederate capital of Richmond and hold him in return for Confederate prisoners of war. Booths group of conspirators: Samuel Arnold, Michael OLaughlen, John Surratt, Lewis Paine, George Atzerodt, David Herold, and Mary Surratt (Johns wife), made plans on March 17, 1865, to capture Lincoln, who was scheduled to see a play at a hospital in the outskirts of Washington. However, Lincoln changed plans and remained in ...
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  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,413 words
    Adult Illiteracy Learning to read is like learning to drive a car. You take lessons and learn the mechanics and the rules of the road. After a few weeks you have learned how to drive, how to stop, how to shift gears, how to park, and how to signal. You have also learned to stop at a red light and understand road signs. When you are ready, you take a road test, and if you pass, you can drive. Phonics-first works the same way. The child learns the mechanics of reading, and when he's through, he can read. Look and say works differently. The child is taught to read before he has learned the mechanics the sounds of the letters. It is like learning to drive by starting your car and driving ahead. ...
    Related: adult, adult literacy, illiteracy, attention deficit, young people
  • Ae Housman: Scholar And Poet - 1,710 words
    ... not in love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus "lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often c ...
    Related: poet, scholar, new jersey, the giver, mood
  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american life
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • African American Women And Music - 1,702 words
    African American Women and Music The purpose of this report was for me to research and explore the connection between African American women and music. Since prior to the slave decades, music has been an integral part of African American society, and served as a form of social, economic, and emotional support in African American communities in the past and present. This paper will cover three different types of secular music that emerged during the slave days, through the civil war, reconstruction, and depression periods. They are blues, jazz, and gospel music. Each of these forms of music are still in existence today. In addition to exploring the history of each of these genres of music, th ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american jazz, american society, american women, black women
  • African Slaves - 490 words
    African Slaves On Thursday, June 29, 1820, at 3:00 P.M., 283 African slaves (two Africans were dead and 281 were in chains) were aboard a slave vessel named, The Antelope, when they were recaptured by the United States Treasury cutter Dallas, under the command of John Jackson. The seizure occurred between Amelia Island and the Florida Coast. After about 2,576 days of captivity and legal battle in the United States, 120 Africans died, 2 were missing, 39 were enslaved in the United States (the 39 included 36 men, one woman, and two boys), and 120 Africans of the Antelope, (there were 22 additional recaptured Africans that were sent with this group, bringing the number to 142), were released fr ...
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  • Aids - 1,146 words
    AIDS Being one of the most fatal viruses in the nation, AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) is now a serious public health concern in most major U.S. cities and in countries worldwide. Since 1986 there have been impressive advances in understanding of the AIDS virus, its mechanisms, and its routes of transmission. Even though researchers have put in countless hours, and millions of dollars it has not led to a drug that can cure infection with the virus or to a vaccine that can prevent it. With AIDS being the leading cause of death among adults, individuals are now taking more precautions with sexual intercourse, and medical facilities are screening blood more thoroughly. Even though HI ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, latin america, hepatitis b, pneumonia
  • Air Quality - 1,726 words
    Air Quality Air Quality & Dispersion Today, the air quality aspect of ARL research is by far the dominant theme, but distinctions among the themes remain somewhat vague. For example, the models developed for emergency response purposes are among those used for air quality prediction. The Air Quality and Dispersion theme is one of the strongest ties that binds ARL's components together. ARL is not heavily involved in the pure science of the business. Instead, ARL focusses on the need to assemble integrated understanding and models from all available sources, to develop the capability to predict changes in air quality that will follow changes in emissions, or that will occur as a result of met ...
    Related: quality assurance, scientific research, global positioning system, silver spring, zone
  • Alaska Airlines - 1,400 words
    Alaska Airlines Alaska Airlines For nearly 70 years, Alaska Airlines has served the west coast of North America. Alaska Airlines has grown from a small regional airline in 1932 to one today that carries more than 12 million customers per year. Alaskas route system spans more than 40 cities and primarily services four countries: Canada, United States, Mexico, and Russia. Its fleet of 88 Boeing jets is the youngest among all major airlines and it has earned U.S. airline recognition from Travel & Leisure and Cond Nast Traveler magazines. The foundation of Alaska Airlines began in 1932, when Mac McGee started flying his three-seat Stinson between Anchorage and Bristol Bay, Alaska. In 1934, a mer ...
    Related: airline industry, alaska, san jose, total assets, financially
  • Alcohol Related Deaths - 1,122 words
    ... " which includes:  Low red meat  Low lard or butter, higher olive oil  High in fish  High in cheese, low in whole milk  High in breads, fruits, and vegetables  Light to moderate wine drinking Horvath says other studies have shown that wine drinkers may simply be more concerned about their health, as compared to non-drinkers, beer drinkers, or hard liquor drinkers. Some studies have shown wine drinkers tend to eat less fat, and more fruits, vegetables, and fish. This would coincide with the Mediterranean Diet. So why not simply drink more grape, or other dark fruit juices? Horvaths report said this would be beneficial, however other reports ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, southern france, heart association, saving
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Alfred Adler - 1,154 words
    Alfred Adler Adler, Alfred Adler, Alfred (1870-1937), Austrian psychologist and psychiatrist, born in Vienna, and educated at Vienna University. After leaving the university he studied and was associated with Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. In 1911 Adler left the orthodox psychoanalytic school to found a neo-Freudian school of psychoanalysis. After 1926 he was a visiting professor at Columbia University, and in 1935 he and his family moved to the United States. In his analysis of individual development, Adler stressed the sense of inferiority, rather than sexual drives, as the motivating force in human life. According to Adler, conscious or subconscious feelings of inferiority ...
    Related: adler, alfred, alfred adler, individual psychology, south china
  • Alfred Housman - 1,708 words
    ... love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus"lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often concentrat ...
    Related: alfred, housman, critical essays, columbia university, allan
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