Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: colored people

  • 69 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • 100 Years Of Degradation - 1,060 words
    100 Years Of Degradation Students were assigned this essay as an inside look at oppression and racism from the last one hundred years, told by two elderly ladies in the book, Having Our Say. 100 Years of Degradation There are several books that have to be read in English 095. Having Our Say is one of them. My advice is to read this book while you are still in 090 or 094, just to get the advantage. These are some things that you will discover in this extraordinary biography. This book is tough to take as humorous, because its heart-wrenching to look at racism in America, but Having Our Say, manages to pull off the feat. Having Our Say really makes you think and tries to somehow reflect on the ...
    Related: degradation, public school system, rights movement, school teacher, negro
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • Affirmative Action - 3,345 words
    ... Aguilar 1. Affirmative action should be eliminated (Sadler 70). Affirmative action does not solve discrimination problems; on the contrary, it harms those the program is meant help. The program divides society into two groups based on ethnicity; this completely defies the effort to have a color-blind America (where society does not see ethnicity or a color difference in any person). Disguised as an equal opportunity program affirmative action discriminates against non-minorities. Affirmative action has its affects in collegiate admissions and employment, however, remains more controversial in college admissions. Many groups protest the abolishment of affirmative action for sake of higher ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, college admissions, best method, dominate
  • African American Heritage In Chicago - 702 words
    African American Heritage In Chicago A History of African American Heritage in Chicago The massive exodus to the north began in 1915; a population of people weary of pervasive hostility and constraint in their former lives, fleeing a social system comprised of miserable oppression and repeated violence. The primary cities for resettlement became New York and Chicago, metropolises humming with the vigor of big-city life and the excitement of a new beginning. When the Chicago Commission asked African American migrants in interviews on Race Relations in 1922 why they came to Chicago, responses were similar. Im looking for better wages. I wanted to get away from the South, and to earn more money ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american heritage, american population, american youth
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Apartheid In Africa - 1,534 words
    ... ed by Robert Sobukwe. For the first time, the ANC was challenged as the leading voice against apartheid. On March 21, 1960, Robert Sobukwe initiated widespread anti-pass law demonstrations. People gathered in thousands at the police station where passes were to be destroyed. As the morning wore on, the crowd, which journalists found "perfectly amiable," appeared to the police increasingly menacing (Thompson, 1996, pp. 74-82). In the early afternoon, seventy-five policemen fired some 700 shots into the crowd, killing 69 Africans and wounding 180. Among them were women and children. Most of the dead had been shot in the back. That evening, a thousand miles away, outside Cape Town, the prot ...
    Related: africa, apartheid, south africa, post colonialism, human rights
  • Biography Of Langston Hughes - 940 words
    Biography Of Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, in 1902. His father, who had studied to become a lawyer, left for Mexico shortly after the baby was born. When Langston was seven or eight he went to live with his grandmother, who told him wonderful stories about Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth and took him to hear Booker T. Washington. She also introduced him to The Crisis, edited by W.E.B. Du Bois, who also wrote The Souls of Black Folk, young Langston's favorite book. After his grandmother died when he was twelve, Langston went to live with her friends, whom he called Auntie and Uncle Reed. Then, at age fourteen, his mother married again, and soon he accomp ...
    Related: biography, hughes, langston, langston hughes, claude mckay
  • Biracial - 1,958 words
    Bi-Racial Table Of Contents Page # I. Cover Page 1 II. Table of Contents 2 III. Report 3 IV. Glossary 12 V. Works Cited 13 Bi-Racial Children Its 3rd grade. Im late for school, and my mother had to walk me in to class so that my teacher would know the reason for my tardiness. My mom opens the door to my class room, and there is a hush of silence. Everyones eyes are fixed on my mother and me. She tells the teacher why I was late, gives me a kiss goodbye and leaves for work. As I sit down at my seat, all of my so-called friends start to call me names and tease me. The students tease me not because I was late, but because my mother is white. Situations like this are hard for a young child ...
    Related: biracial, cultural communication, ethnic groups, personal identity, america
  • Birth Of A Nation: The Suppression Of A People - 1,772 words
    Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People America is believed to be founded as the first state founded on the notion that democracy is for all people, however this is far from the truth. Not only did it take almost two hundred years till the American government grants full opportunities to African American, they even accepted the slavery of these peoples for almost half of that time. A republic government, such as the American government, is based on the idea that all people can have an equal represented fairly and have an equal vote. This is very hard to accomplish when groups of people living within that republic are discriminated against ...
    Related: american people, colored people, suppression, point of view, new brunswick
  • Black Boy - 1,119 words
    Black Boy One main point of the United States Constitution was missing from the Jim Crow South: equality. The Constitution clearly states that all men are created equal, but in the Jim Crow era, blacks were continuously persecuted for something that would be acceptable today. During slavery the South was a place of racial prejudice, discrimination, and hate. Blacks could be punished for simply looking at a white person the wrong way. Punishments included arrests, beatings, even lynchings were a common part of the age. Blacks in this time were considered second class citizens and had basically no rights what so ever. Blacks that Richard knew, dealt with racism in different ways. One way that ...
    Related: black boy, black woman, main point, united states constitution, cigarette
  • Black Boy Essay - 953 words
    Black Boy Essay English 9/23/01 Discrimination against Black and Whites (essay topic #8) This story, Black Boy is a great book that describes how the author, Richard Wright, suffered in the South of the United States during the time when there was still a lot of discrimination throughout the country. Since the author explained many of his horrible experiences in the past, this book cannot be written in a thin book. This thick book is full of his great experiences that wanted to be read by many people in the world in order to let everybody know the disasters of racism. This racism affected Richard Write a lot and he had to adapt to the environment that he was in, although he didn't know how h ...
    Related: black boy, black people, black woman, book reports, colored people
  • Booker T Washington - 1,451 words
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington Booker Taliaferro Washington was the foremost black educators of the 19th and 20th centuries. He also had a major influence on southern race relations and was a dominant figure in black affairs from 1895 until his death in 1915. Booker T. Washington was born into slavery in 1858. As a slave Booker did not have a last name and chose Washington, his stepfather's name. After the Civil War Booker, his brother, and his mother moved to Malden, West Virginia were they went to live with his stepfather, whom they had only seen a few times. When they arrived in Walden, Washington was no more than 10 years old. However, he immediately went to work with his step ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, taliaferro washington, andrew carnegie
  • Booker T Washington: Up From Slavery - 1,325 words
    Booker T. Washington: Up from Slavery Booker T. Washington:'Up from Slavery The autobiography of Booker T. Washing titled Up From Slavery is a rich narrative of the man's life from slavery to one of the founders of the Tuskegee Institute. The book takes us through one of the most dynamic periods in this country's history, especially African Americans. I am very interested in the period following the Civil War and especially in the transformation of African Americans from slaves to freemen. Up From Slavery provides a great deal of information on this time period and helped me to better understand the transition. Up From Slavery provided a narrative on Washington's life, as well as his views o ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, slavery, up from slavery
  • Booker T Washington: Up From Slavery - 1,257 words
    ... r its humble beginnings, the Tuskegee Institute encompassed over 2,300 hundred acres of land, 66 buildings built by the student themselves, and over thirty industrial departments. All of the industrial departments taught trades that allowed students to get jobs as soon as they left the institute. At this point of the institute's life, the major problems were trying to fill the requests for workers. They were receiving more than twice what they could provide. Because of space and funds, the school could only admit half the men and women who applied. Washington sums up his ideas on education in his autobiography: In our industrial teachings we keep three things in mind: first, that the stu ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, slavery, up from slavery
  • Brown Vs The Board Of Education - 1,452 words
    Brown Vs. The Board Of Education Education has long been regarded as a valuable asset for all of America's youth. Yet, when this benefit is denied to a specific group, measures must be taken to protect its educational right. In the 1950's, a courageous group of activists launched a legal attack on segregation in schools. At the head of this attack was NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall; his legal strategies would contribute greatly to the dissolution of educational segregation. According to U.S. Court Cases the segregation among whites and blacks was a legal law established for almost sixty years in the United States. However, Brown vs. The Board of Education was the turning point in race rela ...
    Related: american education, brown, brown v board of education, public education, third grade
  • Carver In Agriculture - 246 words
    Carver In Agriculture American educator and an outstanding innovator in the agricultural sciences. Carver was born of slave parents near Diamond, Missouri. He left the farm where he was born when he was about ten years old and eventually settled in Minneapolis, Kansas, where he worked his way through high school. Following his graduation in 1894 from Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (now Iowa State University), Carver joined the college faculty and continued his studies, specializing in bacteriological laboratory work in systematic botany. In 1896 he became director of the Department of Agricultural Research at Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now Tuskegee Univers ...
    Related: agriculture, carver, department of agriculture, washington carver, iowa state university
  • Civil Disobediance - 1,093 words
    Civil Disobediance Civil Disobedience I believe that civil disobedience is justified as a method of trying to change the law. I think that civil disobedience is an expression of one's viewpoints. If someone is willing to break a law for what they believe in, more power to them! Civil disobedience is defined as, the refusal to obey the demands or commands of a government or occupying power, without resorting to violence or active measures of opposition (Webster's Dictionary). This refusal usually takes the form of passive resistance. Its usual purpose is to force concessions from the government or occupying power. Civil disobedience has been a major tactic and philosophy of nationalist moveme ...
    Related: american civil, civil disobedience, civil government, civil liberties, civil rights, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement
  • Civil Rights - 2,320 words
    Civil Rights Civil Rights Movement in the United States, political, legal, and social struggle by black Americans to gain full citizenship rights and to achieve racial equality. The civil rights movement was first and foremost a challenge to segregation, the system of laws and customs separating blacks and whites that whites used to control blacks after slavery was abolished in the 1860s. During the civil rights movement, individuals and civil rights organizations challenged segregation and discrimination with a variety of activities, including protest marches, boycotts, and refusal to abide by segregation laws. Many believe that the movement began with the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights movement, civil war, individual rights, rights movement, voting rights, voting rights act of 1965
  • Civil Rights - 1,047 words
    Civil Rights The 1960's were one of the most significant decades in the twentieth century. The sixties were filled with new music, clothes, and an overall change in the way people acted, but most importantly it was a decade filled with civil rights movements. On February 1, 1960, four black freshmen from North Carolina Agriculture and Technical College in Greensboro went to a Woolworth's lunch counter and sat down politely and asked for service. The waitress refused to serve them and the students remained sitting there until the store closed for the night. The very next day they returned, this time with some more black students and even a few white ones. They were all well dressed, doing the ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, right to vote, rights movement, voting rights
  • Civil Rights - 1,585 words
    Civil Rights Civil rights are freedoms and rights guaranteed to a member of a community, state, or nation. Freedom of speech, of the press, of religion, and of fair and equal treatment are the basic civil rights. The constitution of the United States contains a Bill of Rights that describes simple liberties and rights insured to every person in the United States. Although the Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the Constitution, civil rights were not always respected to all human beings, especially women and blacks. When the constitution was first written, many Americans understood the meaning of the famous inscripture all men are created equal to mean that all white males were cre ...
    Related: bill of rights, black civil rights, civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights acts, civil rights bill, civil rights division
  • 69 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>