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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: collective action

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  • National Collective Action - 1,289 words
    National Collective Action The framers of the U.S. Constitution were men who wanted to solve the problems of collective action and agency loss. The Articles of Confederation contained many weaknesses, and to amend this, the framers sought to create a strong central government that could delegate authority and cut down transaction costs. Many compromises were necessary in order to solve these conflicts. The framers adopted certain changes that helped to balance the need for effective national collective action against the dangers inherent in the delegation of any authority. This balance represented the political theory that was the basis for the Constitution, and it created the background for ...
    Related: collective, collective action, rights movement, political issues, obstacle
  • The Collective Action Problem Of National Health Care - 1,138 words
    The Collective Action Problem Of National Health Care When societies come together to form governing organizations the goal is to provide a means to deal with public goods. The most basic of these being stability and security for its masses, but as a nation grows its governing bodys obligation does as well. As the nations responsibilities grow the problem of collective action a rises. In this paper health care will be the public good in focus, and how the United States, Canada, and Germany each deal with the disbursement of this public good. A critique of each will be done with three approaches to the collective action problem as the guide. These three outlooks are Thomas Hobbes Leviathan, t ...
    Related: canadian health, care program, care services, care system, collective, collective action, health
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,202 words
    Collective Bargaining In The Workplace Britain has one of the most developed systems of collective bargaining in the world, especially amongst manual workers. Its sophistication is one of the main reasons why British workers traditionally pressed less for the statutory provision of basic rights in the work place than their Continental colleagues. Most trade unionists prefer to put a grievance through procedure' rather than go to an industrial tribunal. Dubin has described collective bargaining as the great social invention that has institutionalised industrial conflict' and by the Donovan Commission as right which is or should be the prerogative of every worker in a democratic society'. It c ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective action, collective bargaining, workplace
  • Education Of The Heart - 1,037 words
    Education Of The Heart John Steinbeck shows the readers many themes in The Grapes of Wrath. One of the most apparent is as Steinbeck stated, The Joads passage through a process of education for the heart. Many characters in The Grapes or Wrath exhibit this theme, but it is valiantly apparent in the actions of the Joads as a family, Tom, Casy, and Rose of Sharon. Although each person in the Joad family is a separate individual, the family often acts as thought it were one person. As one might expect the experiences they incur change the family personality. At the end of the book the Joads have lost their family identity, but they've replaced it with something equally worthy: they've found kin ...
    Related: tom joad, grapes of wrath, good people, strike, footsteps
  • Grapes Of Wrath By Steinbeck - 1,036 words
    Grapes Of Wrath By Steinbeck John Steinbeck shows the readers many themes in "The Grapes of Wrath". One of the most apparent is as Steinbeck stated, "The Joads passage through a process of education for the heart." Many characters in "The Grapes or Wrath" exhibit this theme, but it is valiantly apparent in the actions of the Joads as a family, Tom, Casy, and Rose of Sharon. Although each person in the Joad family is a separate individual, the family often acts as thought it were one person. As one might expect the experiences they incur change the family personality. At the end of the book the Joads have lost their family identity, but they've replaced it with something equally worthy: they' ...
    Related: grapes of wrath, john steinbeck, steinbeck, the grapes of wrath, wrath
  • International Law Is The Body Of Legal Rules That Apply Between Sovereign States And Such Other Entities As Have Been Granted - 1,656 words
    International law is the body of legal rules that apply between sovereign states and such other entities as have been granted international personality (status acknowledged by the international community). The rules of international law are of a normative character, that is, they prescribe towards conduct, and are potentially designed for authoritative interpretation by an international judicial authority and by being capable of enforcement by the application of external sanctions. The International Court of Justice is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations, which succeeded the Permanent Court of International Justice after World War II. Article 92 of the charter of the United Na ...
    Related: apply, international community, international court, international court of justice, international justice, international law, international legal
  • Karl Marx - 1,541 words
    Karl Marx 1 Karl Marx : The Man Behind Communism Were Karl Marx ideas on communism moral? It is quite obvious that some societies do or did believe that communism was a good way of life. Even though there are many drawbacks to communism there are still some advantages. Karl Marx is a man of intrigue he only did what he wanted to and not what others wanted him to do. Upon completion of my research I feel that Marx was a very bright man. His ideas may not be all together but a man that can introduce communism to the world and actually get people to follow Marx ideas is powerful to me. In my research paper I would like to tell you a little about the life and times of Karl Marx, and how is ideas ...
    Related: karl, karl marx, marx, communist manifesto, soviet union
  • Malcolm X Analysis - 1,733 words
    Malcolm X Analysis Frederick 1 [Malcolm X] has become a divided metaphor: for those who love him, he is a powerful lens of self-perception, a means of sharply focusing political and racial priorities; for those that loathe him he is a distorted mirror that reflects violence and hatred (Dyson, 45). Depending on who listen to you can here many different versions of who Malcolm X was. Some call him a visionary who changed many peoples views while others may call him a racist and violent hate-monger. Malcolm X is indeed no ordinary revolutionary figure. He was the anti-thesis of Gandhi or Martin Luther King Jr. non-violent ideologies yet strived to achieve the same goals as them. He wanted equal ...
    Related: autobiography of malcolm x, islam malcolm, malcolm, malcolm little, malcolm x
  • Mary Reynolds - 1,308 words
    Mary Reynolds April 24, 2000 Dr. Boitano U.S. Foreign Policy The Rise of the Superpower Russia and the United States grew to become the main superpowers in the arena of international relations during a specific time in history. The emergence of these two countries as superpowers can be traced back to World War II. In order to be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense political power, and a strong national ideology (Aga-Rossi 65). It was World War II, and its results that caused each of these countries to experience such a plurality of power (Ovyany 97). Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers, but it would be inc ...
    Related: mary, reynolds, third world, axis powers, ensuring
  • Mobilizing Men: Analysis Of The Mens Movement In Canada - 1,276 words
    ... divorce courts and blood sucking ex-wives. However, what has seen the largest reaction and the biggest affect on the development of men's groups in Canada, has been the issue of violence against women. Since 1989, we have seen emergence of two significant large men's organizations, including Men For Change (Halifax) and the development of the White Ribbon Campaign(WRC), (Toronto). The uniqueness of this phenomena is as a result of not only the different sociological and cultural norms between Canadian and American men, but more significantly the Montreal Massacre. On December 6 1989, a young man entered the Ecole Polytechnic in Montreal with a Sturm Ruger Mini-14 semi-automatic rifle an ...
    Related: canada, men and women, mens, women in canada, temple university
  • Nazi Art As Propaganda - 1,167 words
    Nazi Art As Propaganda Nazi Germany regulated and controlled the art produced between 1933 and 1945 to ensure they embodied the values they wished to indoctrinate into the German people. The notion of volk (people) and blut und boden (soil and blood) was championed in paintings to glorify an idealized rural Germany and instill a sense of superiority in the Nordic physicality. Highly veristic and asthetisized works romanticized everyday subjects and reiterated redundant stereotyped Nazi ideals of the human body and its purposes in the Reich. Paintings of Adolf Hitler valorized and his image to heroic status, even to the extent of deification, elevating him to a god-like status. By promoting H ...
    Related: nazi, nazi germany, nazi ideology, propaganda, political ideology
  • Stratification Theorists Karl Marx And Max Weber - 1,123 words
    Stratification Theorists - Karl Marx and Max Weber The area of social stratification has been the starting point of many arguments about how and why societies are divided. Some societies will shout that they are classless whilst others will construct a whole culture around the divisions within. Individuals will vehemently point out that they are from one class when others have said differently. Some groups within society will inform other groups that they are in an especially disadvantaged position because of all the other groups advantaged position. In short, social stratification is a minefield waiting for the sociologist to jump into, backwards and blindfolded. However, even with this hos ...
    Related: karl, karl marx, marx, max weber, social stratification, stratification, weber
  • Structures Of Resisitance - 1,363 words
    ... nt an involution whereby traditional technology, organisation and administration increased in complexity, became more rigid and inflexible, but did not alter in any significant way. Traditional means of operation were constantly reified and labour effort intensified in an effort to extract the most surplus out of a decadent system. This intensification met little resistance: [n]ot living on the land and even physically separated from it by fixed residence in agro-towns, the peasants could less easily lay claim to it and thereby challenge large landownership. Eugen Weber even goes on to question whether such radical action would have any appeal for the peasantry, to whom innovation was al ...
    Related: social structure, structures, social power, national economy, evolve
  • The Computer Underground - 4,790 words
    ... d be free. 3. Third, mistrust authority and promote decentralization. 4. Fourth, hackers should be judged by their prowess as hack- ers rather than by formal organizational or other irrele- vant criteria. 5. Fifth, one can create art and beauty on a computer. 6. Finally, computers can change lives for the better. PHRACK, recognized as the "official" p/hacker newsletter, expanded on this creed with a rationale that can be summarized in three principles ("Doctor Crash," 1986). First, hackers reject the notion that "businesses" are the only groups entitled to ac- cess and use of modern technology. Second, hacking is a major weapon in the fight against encroaching computer technology. Fi- na ...
    Related: computer networks, computer software, computer system, computer systems, computer technology, underground
  • Trade Unions A Future - 1,542 words
    Trade Unions - A Future? Trade Unions - a future? A trade union is an independant self-regulating organization of workers created to protect and advance the interests of its members through collective action. Over recent years, it has become fashionable in many quarters to write off Britains trade unions, to label them as obsolete institutions out of touch with new realities and incapable of change. In todays world of individual employment contracts, performance-related pay schemes, Human Resource and Total Quality Management and all the other ingredients of the so-called new workplace, trade unions are often regarded as anachronistic obstacles preventing success of the market economy. As co ...
    Related: trade union, union members, union membership, union organization, legal advice
  • United Nations - 3,616 words
    ... ce negotiations began in October 1918,United States president Woodrow Wilson insisted that his Fourteen Points serve as a basis for the signing of the Armistice . The Armistice included the formation of the League of Nations (here after refereed to as the League). And as the years went by the League grew to be a formidable organization. It's goals and objectives were precise, they were to attain and maintain world peace. By 1935 the League had declined severely. And In 1945 the League ended and the United Nations (referred to as the UN) took its place. There were a lot of similarities between the two organizations, however the differences were apparent as well. Scholars have tried to asc ...
    Related: league of nations, united nations, united states president, people's republic of china, men and women
  • United Nations Research Paper What Was The United Nations Role As Peacekeeping Force In The North Korean Conflict - 1,475 words
    United Nations Research Paper. What Was The United Nations Role As Peacekeeping Force In The North Korean Conflict TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION-------------------------------------- -------2 The birth of the United Nations BACKGROUND ----------------------------------------------3 The idea of peacekeeping KOREA -------------------------------------------------- ------4 The Korean War The UN's role in the Korean conflict UNTCOK & UNCOK --------------------------------4 UNKURK ----------------------------------------------4 Military forces in Korea - the final action --------6 Conclusion -------------------------------------------------- -7 Bibliography -------------------------------------- ...
    Related: korean, korean conflict, korean war, military force, north korea, north korean, peacekeeping
  • Washington Dc In Opposition Of Imf And World Bank - 493 words
    Washington Dc In Opposition Of Imf And World Bank On Saturday, April 15, protesters gathered in Washington DC in opposition of the IMF and World Bank. The two institutions were to have their spring meeting this weekend and the approximately ten thousand protesters, whose main point is the elimination of poverty, paraded down the streets of DC The protesters feel that what the IMF and World Bank do not see the short term effects of their proposals for economic growth, which include unemployment and increased poverty. The protesters feel that the only people benefiting from such ideas are the large corporations. Fortunately, though many were arrested, none were seriously injured, as was the ca ...
    Related: bank, developing world, george washington, world bank, term effects
  • Why Unions P1 Unions Are Groups Of Working People Who Join To Talk To Employers About Wages And Conditions Of Work Instead Of - 1,236 words
    WHY UNIONS? P.1 "Unions are groups of working people who join to talk to employers about wages and conditions of work instead of workers talking to employers on an individual basis."1 Because they speak for everybody, unions can get a better deal for each worker than one employee could by negotiating with the employer. As seen in the short movie "WHY UNIONS?", non-unionized workers talks about the unfair treatment they experience in the work place. Through collective action, workers formed unions so they could have a voice in deciding wageges, hours, working conditions and dealing with the many problems arises in the workplace. Unions are not just organizations trying to get more dollars and ...
    Related: union members, wages, standard of living, maximum profit, strike
  • Wwii Rise Of The Superpowers - 2,058 words
    WWII - Rise of the Superpowers Rise of the Superpowers (USA & USSR) from events prior to and during WWII World War II: the process of superpowerdom It is often wondered how the superpowers achieved their position of dominance. It seems that the maturing of the two superpowers, Russia and the United States, can be traced to World War II. To be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense international political power and, related to this, a strong national ideology. It was this war, and its results, that caused each of these superpowers to experience such a preponderance of power. Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers ...
    Related: wwii, axis powers, historical background, continental europe, super
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