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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aging

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  • Aging Theories - 1,709 words
    Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affec ...
    Related: aging, aging process, cell division, free radicals, gradual
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Apoptosis And Aging - 1,110 words
    Apoptosis And Aging When we gain control of the gene responsible for the phenomenon of apoptosis, we will be in control of aging. We are finding more evidence every day, indicating genetic links to all sorts of factors in the human being. We are just now beginning to scratch the surface of our own genetics. A landmark discover has just been unveiled: In February [2001], the two groups charting the human genome published their results - the entire 3 billion base pair sequence. The only definitive conclusion so far: Humans are far more complicated than we thought. ... Eric Lander, director of the Whitehead Center for Genome Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts ... adds: "within a decade, we wi ...
    Related: aging, apoptosis, personal interview, natural process, florida
  • Sex And Gender, Families And Aging - 867 words
    Sex And Gender, Families And Aging Just 20 years ago, in most states a woman could not sign an apartment lease, get a credit rating, or apply for a loan unless her husband or a male relative agreed to share the responsibility. Similarly, a 1965 study found that fifty one percent of men though women were temperamentally unfit for management. There can be no doubt that we have progressed a long way from these ideas in the last three decades. However, it is also unquestionable that women in the work force are still discriminated against, sexually harassed, paid less than men, and suffer from occupational sex segregation and fears of failure as well as fears of success. We will address all of th ...
    Related: aging, social issues, occupational segregation, santa clara, avenue
  • A Critical Analysis - 328 words
    A Critical Analysis A Critical Analysis of Evelyn Waugh's "Bella Fleace Gave a Party" In the introduction to "Bella Fleace Gave a Party", extensive background is revealed to help the reader understand the times in which the character lived. It is a time of enormous change in the political and social structure of these people's lives. An aging socialite is introduced in many direct and indirect characterizations. She is portrayed as a confused and ill-tempered woman shunned by most because of her nature. Conflict arises quickly when a distant cousin, her heir, arrives and covets some books in the house. Bella responds by selling the books, and decides to squander the proceeds on repairing the ...
    Related: critical, critical analysis, social structures, social structure, people's
  • A Picture Of Dorian Gray Basils Changes As Related To Wildes Opinion On Art - 888 words
    A Picture of Dorian Gray Basil's Changes As Related To Wilde's Opinion On Art A Picture of Dorian Gray Basil's Changes As Related To Wilde's Opinion On Art Oscar Wilde, author of The Picture of Dorian Gray, makes Basil's life change drastically by having him paint a portrait of Dorian Gray and express too much of himself in it, which, in Wilde's mind, is a troublesome obstacle to circumvent. Wilde believes that the artist should not portray any of himself in his work, so when Basil does this, it is he who creates his own downfall, not Dorian. Wilde introduces Basil to Dorian when Basil begins to notice Dorian staring at him at a party. Basil "suddenly became conscious that someone was lookin ...
    Related: dorian, dorian gray, gray, oscar wilde, picture of dorian gray, the picture of dorian gray
  • A Picture Of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde - 868 words
    A Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde, author of The Picture of Dorian Gray, makes Basil's life change drastically by having him paint a portrait of Dorian Gray and express too much of himself in it, which, in Wilde's mind, is a troublesome obstacle to circumvent. Wilde believes that the artist should not portray any of himself in his work, so when Basil does this, it is he who creates his own downfall, not Dorian. Wilde introduces Basil to Dorian when Basil begins to notice Dorian staring at him at a party. Basil "suddenly became conscious that someone was looking at [him]. [He] turned halfway around and saw Dorian Gray for the first time" (Wilde 24). Basil immediately notices ...
    Related: dorian, dorian gray, gray, oscar, oscar wilde, picture of dorian gray, the picture of dorian gray
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,415 words
    A ROSE FOR EMILY A Rose for Emily takes place after the Civil War and into the 1900s in the town of Jefferson, Mississippia town very similar to the one in which William Faulkner spent most of his life. It is a story of the conflict between the old and the new South, the past and the presentwith Emily and the things around her steadfastly representing the dying old traditions and the present expressed mostly through the words of the narrator but also through Homer Barron and the new board of aldermen. The issue of racism also runs throughout the story. In part I, Faulkner refers to Emily as a "fallen monument", a monument to the southern gentility that existed before the Civil War. Her house ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, poor emily, rose for emily, colonel sartoris
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,095 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire While it can be argued that all of the characters in Tennese Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire are living in an illusion, I do not think that all the characters are living an unreal existence, however some are, in particular Blanche, Stella and Stanley. Blanch, to some extent, is living in her own fantasy world plagued with delusions and outbursts. It is quite obvious that she is living an illusion. Stella is living an unreal existence in regards to the way in which she likes to pretend she is living in a happy home. Stanley is also, however to a much lesser extent, living an unreal existence. He is very self-centered and towards the end he seems to be living ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, upper class
  • Accidents - 1,643 words
    ... ike metallurgy, forensics, etc. 5. Obtain all other non-privileged materials gathered by the SIB. 6. Obtain a list of the SIB witnesses. Once all the data and evidence has been collected the advisors are brought in to review all the information and make judgments and evaluations, not to mention aid in the writing of the report. A maintenance advisor reviews maintenance records, documentation, personnel and supervision. A Medical advisor should review: 1. Medical qualifications 2. Postmortem and toxicology reports. Which by the way are obtained from the SIB flight surgeon. 3. Post-accident medical examination records of survivors. 4. And last but not least autopsy protocols and medical re ...
    Related: life support, the intended, total cost, partial, mention
  • Air And Water - 412 words
    Air And Water A major transition in the modern energy age began in the 1970s, when the big nations industry started to grow up rapidly. The use of oil was very important and overnight, oil prices shot through the roof, and the trend of ever-cheaper, ever-more-plentiful energy sources were in need. Another player on the modern energy stage is nuclear power. An industry that didn't exist 40 years ago is now at a huge amount of production, producing 20 percent of the nation's electricity. Ironically, the industry is fading out. New orders ceased 20 years ago, and as aging plants reach the end of their lives, they are closing, one by one. All the non-renewable energy resources have positive and ...
    Related: renewable energy, fuel cells, nuclear fusion, chernobyl, cheap
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Alfred Housman - 1,661 words
    Alfred Housman Alfred Edward Housman, a classical scholar and poet, was born in Fockbury in the county of Worcestershire, England on March 26, 1859. His poems are variations on the themes of mortality and the miseries of human condition (Magill 1411). Most of Housmans poems were written in the 1890s when he was under great psychological stress, which made the tone of his poems characteristically mournful and the mood dispirited (Magill 1411). "In the world of Housmans poetry, youth fades to dust, lovers are unfaithful, and death is the tranquil end of everything (Magill 1412)." Throughout his life, Housman faced many hardships. The loss of his mother at age 12 shattered his childhood and lef ...
    Related: alfred, housman, true meaning, common theme, imagery
  • Alzheimers - 1,205 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behavior (Internet). It is a degenerative disease affecting nerve cells of the frontal and temporal lobes of the cerebrum of the brain. The disease is the major cause of presenile dementia (i.e., the loss of mental faculties not associated with advanced age) and is thought to be the largest single cause of senile dementia as well (Britannica, 306). It causes the connections between cells to become ineffective and the cells themselves to shutdown and eventually die (Davies, 1). Alzheimers is a progressive, irreversible, fatal neurologic disorder that ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, warning signs, mental illness, paranoia
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,261 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease We are currently living in the age of technology. Our advancements in the past few decades overshadow everything learned in the last 2000 years. With the elimination of many diseases through effective cures and treatments, humans can expect to live a much longer life then that of their grandparents. The population of the United States continues to rise, and with the baby boom era coming of age, the number of elderly people is rising as well. This increase has brought with it a large increase in diseases associated with old age. Alzheimer's dementia is one of the most common and feared diseases afflicting the elderly community. Alzheimers disease, once th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, different types, psychoactive drugs
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,259 words
    ... ors leading outside (Alzheimers disease sufferers are known to wander off); clearing floors of clutter; and reducing the contents of closets in order to simplify choices (Alzheimer, 1992, p.17). Costs are typically paid for by the victim's family. Many of these, and other more expensive modifications are introduced in long-term care settings. They help in maintaining the safety and security of the victim as well as reducing their confusion. The patient's and the family's condition should be assessed every six months (Alzheimer, 1992, p.21). In response to constantly changing needs, the aspects of care must be constantly modified. Other issues that usually arise during the care of the pat ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, muscular dystrophy, long term care, alleviating
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,539 words
    Alzheimer`s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that affects the brain. Individuals with AD experience a progressive and specific loss of cognitive function resulting from the differentiation of the limbic system, association neocortex, and basal forebrain. It is also accompanied by the deposition of amyloid in plaques and cerebrovasculature, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Alois Alzheimer, a German doctor, diagnosed this disease for the first time in 1907. At that time it was considered a rare disorder. Currently, this tragic brain disorder affects approximately four million people; It is the most common type of dementia and the fourth ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, physiological processes, limbic system
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,004 words
    Alzheimer's Disease Dementia is the loss of intellectual and social abilities severe enough to interfere with daily functioning. For centuries, people called it senility and considered it an inevitable part of aging. It is now known that dementia is not a normal part of the aging process and that it is caused by an underlying condition. People with this condition need special assistance to carry on with their normal lives. This paper will explain some of the social services that are helping to combat this disease and an analysis of the services effectiveness. More than four million older Americans have Alzheimer's, the most common form of dementia. And that number is expected to triple in th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, cardiovascular disease, disease process
  • Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of - 960 words
    Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of Alzheimers disease : Neurobiology, causes and treatments of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common of the dementing illnesses. A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. A person with Alzhiemers Disease may experience personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, confusion and difficulty finishing thoughts, following directions or even finding the right word to say in a conversation. Once advanced the sufferer may require a caretaker as daily chores become very difficult to accomplish. Evidence points toward amyloid as one of the main causes for the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, diagnosis treatment, main causes, nitric oxide
  • Alzheimers Qa - 932 words
    Alzheimer's Q&A Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Assoc. Inc. 70 E. Lake Street, Suite 600 Chicago, Illinois 60601 What is Alzheimer's Disease? The most common form of dementing illness, Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. The person with AD may experience confusion, personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, and difficulty finding words, finishing thoughts or following directions. It eventually leaves its victims incapable of caring for themselves. What happens to the brain in Alzheimer's Disease? The nerve cells in the part of the brain that controls memory, thinking, are d ...
    Related: chicago illinois, aging process, men and women, nerve, tissue
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