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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: coleridge

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  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice - 1,753 words
    Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice Coleridge and the Explosion of Voice Coleridge is so often described in terms which are akin to the word, "explosive," and by all accounts he was at times an unusually dynamic,charismatic and unpredictable person. His writings themselves could also betermed "explosive" merely from their physical form; a fragmented mass, some pieces finished but most not, much of his writing subject to procrastination or eventual change of mind. Today I want to address a moment in his life which produced, as Richard Holmes has characterized it, an explosion of his poetic talent[1]--Autumn 1799, when he first met Sara Hutchinson, and wrote, amongst other poems, the ballad, ...
    Related: coleridge, explosion, oral tradition, sir walter scott, ashamed
  • Coleridge And The Explosion Of Voice - 1,781 words
    ... than French and English."[15] During the Lyrical Ballads months, he composed many experimental ballad poems: between September 1797 and April 1798 he began The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Christabel, "The Three Graves," and "The Ballad of the Dark Ladie." Soon after, he traveled to Germany with the Wordsworths; he spent virtually a year there, reading German philosophy and aesthetics voraciously, particularly Kant, Schelling, and the Schlegels. It was during this visit that he bought Herder's Volkslieder. He returned to England in July, 1799. And in the autumn of that year, amid his failing marriage, he traveled to Durham and met Sara Hutchinson whilst with the Wordsworths. He fell in ...
    Related: coleridge, explosion, william hazlitt, ancient times, strict
  • The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner By Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1772 1834 - 1,736 words
    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834) The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834) Type of Work: Lyrical fantasy ballad Setting A sailing ship traveling the seas; late Medieval period Principal Characters The Ancient Mariner, a sailor-storyteller The Wedding Guest, a listener The Ship's Crew The Allbatross, a symbolic representation of God's creatures - and Man's guilt The Hermit, a rescuer representing God Story Overveiw (Coleridge introduces his tale by describing an old gray-headed sailor who approaches three young men headed for a wedding celebration and compels one of them, the groom's next-of-kin, to hear his story. O Weddi ...
    Related: ancient mariner, coleridge, mariner, rime, rime of the ancient mariner, samuel, samuel taylor coleridge
  • Wordsworth Coleridge - 917 words
    Wordsworth & Coleridge Despite surface differences between Coleridges Frost at Midnight and Wordsworths Tintern Abbey, upon close examination and reading it becomes clear that they are two fundamentally similar poems. The language in each is similar, as well as the use of descriptive imagery to appeal to the readers visual sense. Mostly though, the similarities are found in the tone and message of the two poems. Both poets are remembering nature/commonplace scenes and speaking of them to their loved ones, Coleridge in a more supernatural sense and Wordsworth in a very open, honest manner. The structure of both poems is exactly the same, except for the fact that Tintern Abbey is longer than F ...
    Related: coleridge, wordsworth, lyrical ballads, tough times, seasons
  • A Traveler Is Resolute And Independent - 1,973 words
    A Traveler is Resolute and Independent Tenets of Wordsworth in Resolution and Independence Romanticism officially began in 1798, when William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge anonymously published Lyrical Ballads. This work marked the official beginning of a literary period which had already begun many years before 1798. A work is defined to be of a certain period by its characteristics, therefore to be considered a Romantic work, the work must contain aspects which are termed "Romantic." A few typical "Romantic" aspects are: love of the past; sympathy to the childs mind; faith in the inner goodness of man; aspects of nature having religious, mystic, and symbolic significance; and reco ...
    Related: traveler, william wordsworth, role model, lyrical ballads, sleepless
  • Animals In Romantic Poetry - 569 words
    Animals In Romantic Poetry Animals in Romantic Poetry Many Romantic poets expressed a fascination with nature in their works. Even more specific than just nature, many poets, such as William Blake, Robert Burns, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge all seemed fascinated with animals. Animals are used as symbols throughout poetry, and are also used to give the reader something to which they can relate. No matter what the purpose, however, animals played a major part in Romantic Poetry. William Blake used animals as basic building blocks for poems such as "The Lamb" and "The Tyger." By using these carefully selected animals to depict good and evil, the reader truly understands Blake's words. All reader ...
    Related: poetry, romantic, romantic poetry, romantic poets, narrative poem
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,157 words
    Born in Boston in 1809, Edgar Poe was destined to lead a rather somber and brief life, most of it a struggle against poverty. His mother died when Edgar was only two, his father already long disappeared. He was raised as a foster child in Virginia by Frances Allen and her husband John, a Richmond tobacco merchant. Poe later lived in Baltimore with his aunt, Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, whom he eventually married. The trio formed a household which moved to New York and then to Philadelphia, where they lived for about six years -- apparently the happiest, most productive years of his life. Of Poe's several Philadelphia homes, only this one survives. In 1844 they moved to New York, wh ...
    Related: boston, edgar, edgar allen, pulitzer prize, tale heart
  • Edgar Allan Poe - 2,712 words
    ... ar left for the University he was engaged to Elmira. The affair, however, was not made known to the adults of either household. In February, 1826, Edgar A. Poe matriculated at the University of Virginia. He was then only a little more than seventeen, but his manhood may be said to have begun. His position at the University was a precarious one. As the son of a wealthy man he had a great deal of credit and Poe himself was prone to live up to the reputation. On the other hand his foster-father appears even at this time to have been so alienated from his ward that he provided him with considerably less than the amount necessary to pay his way. The young student made a rather brilliant recor ...
    Related: allan, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, john allan
  • Edith Wharton: A Brief Personal History And Overview Of Literary Achievements - 1,504 words
    Edith Wharton: A brief personal history and overview of literary achievements The cultural advancement of the 1920's has many important literary figures associated with it. Names such as T.S. Elliot, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald are some of the better-known names. Edith Wharton is one of the less known of the period, but is still a formidable writer. This paper will explore Ms. Wharton's life and history and give a brief background surrounding some of her more popular novels. Ms. Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones on January 24, 1862, in her parents' mansion and West Twenty-Third Street in New York City. Her mother, Lucretia Stevens Rhinelander, connected with wealthy Dutch lan ...
    Related: brief background, edith, edith wharton, history, literary criticism, literary works, overview
  • Edith Wharton: A Brief Personal History And Overview Of Literary Achievements - 1,504 words
    Edith Wharton: A brief personal history and overview of literary achievements The cultural advancement of the 1920's has many important literary figures associated with it. Names such as T.S. Elliot, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald are some of the better-known names. Edith Wharton is one of the less known of the period, but is still a formidable writer. This paper will explore Ms. Wharton's life and history and give a brief background surrounding some of her more popular novels. Ms. Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones on January 24, 1862, in her parents' mansion and West Twenty-Third Street in New York City. Her mother, Lucretia Stevens Rhinelander, connected with wealthy Dutch lan ...
    Related: brief background, edith, edith wharton, history, literary criticism, literary works, overview
  • Edith Wharton: A Brief Personal History And Overview Of Literary Achievements - 1,504 words
    Edith Wharton: A brief personal history and overview of literary achievements The cultural advancement of the 1920's has many important literary figures associated with it. Names such as T.S. Elliot, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald are some of the better-known names. Edith Wharton is one of the less known of the period, but is still a formidable writer. This paper will explore Ms. Wharton's life and history and give a brief background surrounding some of her more popular novels. Ms. Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones on January 24, 1862, in her parents' mansion and West Twenty-Third Street in New York City. Her mother, Lucretia Stevens Rhinelander, connected with wealthy Dutch lan ...
    Related: brief background, edith, edith wharton, history, literary criticism, literary works, overview
  • Felicia Hemans And Jane Taylor - 1,094 words
    Felicia Hemans And Jane Taylor The literacy world of the 19th century saw an emergence of female writers into the male dominated profession of poetry. Many men felt as though their profession was being invaded. They resented women entering the public sphere. This mentality in part helped influence which women were able to write and what they wrote about. Felicia Hemans and Jane Taylor are both women poets that emerged during the 19th century. Both women have used their poetry to help expand on traditional notions of romantic poetry during their lives. In order to define romantic poetry on must look towards Bronte and Hemans male contemporaries at the time since their works influenced many ot ...
    Related: felicia, jane, taylor, public sphere, women writers
  • Grendel Frankenstein An Analysis Of The Two Monsters And Their Superiority To Mankind Grendel Frankenstein An Analysis Of The - 1,256 words
    ... comes to grief, it will be because [the powerful] have become alarmed at [their] own brutality"(Gardner 117). Then, as the rich descend, the poor will rise to power in order to complete the revolution. "The total ruin of institutions and [heroism] is [in itself] an act of creation"(Gardner 118). To break the circle would cause "evolution," forward progress, that would enhance the natural progress of mankind. But, according to Gardner, this will never happen because the powerful enjoy their present state of grace; and when they helpless rise up, they are immediately repressed in a "cry [of] common good"(Gardner 119). Though not as overt as Grendel, the concept of "revolution" is also dis ...
    Related: frankenstein, grendel, mankind, superiority, the monster
  • Hamlet - 1,163 words
    Hamlet Hamlet's behavior affects that of the other characters in the play in that his action drastically alters, not only their perception of Hamlet and his intentions, but also their actions and words in dealing with Hamlet. It is difficult to classify Hamlet as either sane or insane; however, it is certain that his mad behavior, whether feigned or authentic, serves only to heighten the confusion and eventual suspicion of the court, particularly Ophelia, Rosencrantz and Guilderstern, and Polonius and Claudius duo. Hamlet's mental state is hard to decipher due to the complexity of the issue and the variety of ways his actions can be viewed. Edward Strachey believes that Hamlet is, A characte ...
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  • Hamlet As Hero - 1,892 words
    Hamlet As Hero We often wonder why Shakespeare's character Hamlet, in the play Hamlet, waited so long after bring told by the ghost, about the evil deed, before carrying out his plan. Everyone contains a tinge of Hamlet in his or her feelings, wants, and worries. Hamlet is not like other tragic heroes of his period. He stands apart from other Shakespeare's heroes in his much discussed innocence. Is this supposed tragic hero maybe an ideal hero, one without the tragic flaw, which has been a part of the formula for the tragedy since the Golden Age of Greece? This is a question that has been the field for many literary critics' battles. The main, and, most often, the only flaw that has been att ...
    Related: hamlet, king hamlet, tragic hero, literary criticism, revenge tragedy
  • Hamlet Feelings - 1,738 words
    Hamlet Feelings Everyone contains a tinge of Hamlet in his feelings, wants, and worries, and proudly so, for Hamlet is not like the other tragic heroes of his period. He stands apart from other Shakespeare's heroes in his today much discussed innocence. Is this supposed tragic hero maybe an ideal hero - one without the tragic flaw, which has been a part of the formula for the tragedy since the Golden age of Greece?; is a question that has been the field for many literary critics' battles. The main, and, most often, the only flaw that has been attributed to Hamlet is his delay. This seems to constitute the central part in Hamlet. Critics seem to cling to this detail, as if trying to save the ...
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  • Hamlet Study - 1,434 words
    Hamlet Study The study of Shakespeares Hamlet has been one that is very extensive as well as enormous. Books upon books have been written about this great play. About an equal amount of books, however, have been written about one character; Hamlet. A critic of Hamlet once said, "a man set out to read all the books about Hamlet would have time to read nothing else, not even Hamlet." What is the great fascination with Hamlet and the characters contained within. The great intrigue comes from the ambiguity of the play and its characters. "Hamlet is the tragedy of reflection. The cause of the heros delay is irresolution; and the cause of this is excess of the reflexive and speculative habit of th ...
    Related: hamlet, political environment, character analysis, twentieth century, questioning
  • Hamlet Study - 1,448 words
    ... ons as proof of his insanity. But if one were to observe and analyze these passages, they would see that truth and sanity behind them. But the sanity is only a small part. For these passages hold great and profound thought. There are many situations in which Hamlets thoughts are profound. These are not the ponderies of a man gone mad, but of a brain contained within a prison. Of a man whose intellect is holding him back. The first occasion in which Hamlets words, perceived mad, proved to be profound, was with his encounter with Polonius. Polonius, trying to keenly pry from Hamlet his ailment, strikes up a seemingly innocent conversation with Hamlet. To test his madness, Polonius asks Ham ...
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  • Honest Iago - 1,063 words
    Honest Iago Honest Iago The poet Coleridge appropriately described the character of Iago as being one of motiveless malignity. Throughout the play Iagos motives are secondary to, and seem only to serve as justification for, his actions. Iago is driven by his nature of character. To discuss Coleridges assessment we must look at Iagos characterfrom Iagos point of view and that of the other charactershis motives, methods, and pawns. Through some carefully thought-out words and actions, Iago is able to manipulate others to do things in a way that benefits him; all the while he is pushing Othello, Desdemona, Roderigo, Emilia, and Cassio to their tragic end. According to Websters New International ...
    Related: honest, honest iago, iago, othello iago, walter lippmann
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