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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cognitive dissonance

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  • Cognitive Dissonance - 549 words
    Cognitive Dissonance According to cognitive dissonance theory, there is a tendency for individuals to seek consistency among their cognitions (beliefs, expectations, or opinions of a particular individual). When inconsistency does exist between these beliefs or attitudes, psychological tension (dissonance) occurs and must be resolved through some action. This tension most often results when an individual must choose between two incompatible beliefs or actions and is heightened when alternatives are equally attractive to the individual. This tension state has drive-like properties. If dissonance is experienced as an unpleasant drive state, the individual is motivated to reduce it. However, it ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive dissonance, dissonance, dissonance theory
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 1,050 words
    Cognitive Dissonance Cognitive Dissonance How do human beings make decisions? What triggers a person to take action at any given point? These are allquestions that I will attempt to answer with my theoretical research into Leon Festingers theory of cognitive dissonance, as well as many of the other related theories. We often do not realize the psychological events that take place in our everyday lives. It is important to take notice of theories, such as the balance theory, the congruency theory and the cognitive dissonance theory so that ones self-persuasion occurs knowingly. As psychologist and theorist gain a better understanding of Festingers cognitive dissonance theory manipulation could ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive dissonance, dissonance, dissonance theory, value systems
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 1,077 words
    ... earch paper. Either myself and/or my friends would be active participants in the persuasion process. The basic premise of the cognitive-dissonance theory is that when two pieces of information do not follow each other we will experience some form of psychological tension, which we will attempt to reduce in some way. Often times, according to Leon Festinger, people attempt to reduce cognitive dissonance whenever possible (Gleitman, 1983, p.12). I noticed many times that my friends were very interested in the topic of quitting their habit, and some at times took the issue personally. When people are personally involved with an issue, much like the use of tobacco, they are much more attenti ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive dissonance, dissonance, dissonance theory, developmental psychology
  • Cognitive Dissonance And The Movie 2001 - 268 words
    Cognitive Dissonance And The Movie 2001 The argument that the paper states is that a persons wants and desires influence more than just behavior. They influence his/her thinking and even his/her power of perception. The most important point made is that when a person is confronted by ideas or facts that are against their pre-existing notions and ideas, what results is cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance is referred to as a sort of static in the human psyche. This static caused by cognitive dissonance has the power to distort or even block perception. When disturbing information creates cognitive dissonance, the static discredits the information, so that a person does not feel compelle ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive dissonance, dissonance, culture shock, widespread
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,123 words
    Analysis of the underlying social psychology of the Holocaust March 9, 2000 The hate and prejudice that began the Holocaust went hand in hand with a political agenda that was fueled by the frustration aggression theory.(1) Hitler blamed the Jews for the loss of World War I and thus, instead of targeting political aspects of the Jewish community, he displaced his aggression towards ALL Jews, even the helpless. This, combined with religious anti-Semitism prejudice that had been present in Germany for 1500 years and the theory of eugenics, was the political and instrumental center of Hitler's political campaign.(5) He used a system of 'elimination of freedom', which he felt was necessary in the ...
    Related: psychology, social psychology, underlying, cognitive dissonance, jewish community
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,161 words
    ... ople rescued others for various reasons. Some were motivated by a sense of morality. Others had a relationship with a particular person or group and thus, felt a sense of obligation. Some were politically driven and were adamantly opposed to Hitler. Other rescuers were involved at work as diplomats, nurses, social workers, and doctors, and thus were conditioned to continue their involvement beyond their professional obligation. This is where cognitive dissonance comes into effect in this instance. These people were raised to help, it was a part of their moral fabric. To go against that learned belief would cause dissonance, therefore, these people had it woven into them to rescue, to hel ...
    Related: psychology, social animal, social psychology, social workers, underlying
  • And Media Effect - 1,372 words
    Tv And Media Effect Television is a vital source from which most Americans receive information. News and media delegates on television have abused theirs powers over society through the airing of appealing news shows that misinform the public. Through literary research and experimentation, it has been proven that people's perception of reality has been altered by the information they receive from such programs. Manipulation, misinterpretation, word arrangement, picture placement and timing are all factors and tricks that play a major role in the case. Research, experimentation, and actual media coverage has pinpointed actual methods used for deceptive advertising. Television influences socie ...
    Related: media, media coverage, media studies, news & media, news program
  • And Media Effect - 1,265 words
    ... on discovered that female athletes have been underrepresented in the media for quite some time. Studies show that only %15 of coverage in newspapers and %5 of television air time has been given to covering female athletes. (Fink 1998) These experiments and surveys correlate with another experiment conducted by John Steel, "A survey has indicated that around two-thirds of young people base their moral judgements on how a decision made them feel and whether it helped them succeed. Electronic media support these views and increase the importance of self" (Steel 1997). The on-campus experiment contained statistical questions that pertained to situations that people may have learned about on ...
    Related: electronic media, mass media, media, media coverage, media research, media studies
  • Conformity - 453 words
    Conformity The more people already agree upon or share a particular idea, the more easily a newcomer will in turn be be converted to that idea, and the more difficult it will be for one already converted to reject that idea This conformity pressure can be explained by the fact that the newcomer will be subjected to expressions of the idea more often, and will more likely get in trouble if he expresses dissonant idea (Heylighen, 1992). Though conformity pressure is mostly irrational, often rejecting knowledge that is adequate because it contradicts already established beliefs, its alternative formulation, consensus, is a criterion of the INVARIAN.html type, since it implies that a belief does ...
    Related: conformity, cognitive dissonance, bibliography references, point of view, relation
  • Creativity: Beer Can Theory - 4,998 words
    ... how discrete memories become woven into a worldview. Although this account focuses on integration of the worldview through the emergence of deeper, more general concepts, the principles apply equally to integration of the psyche through the purification of intentions and emotions. A detailed account of the proposal can be found in [Gabora 1998], and elaborations in [Gabora 1999, 2000], but the basic line of reasoning goes as follows. Much as catalysis increases the number of different polymers, which in turn increases the frequency of catalysis, reminding events increase concept density by triggering abstraction - the formation of abstract concepts or categories such as 'tree' or 'big' ...
    Related: beer, cognitive dissonance, love songs, information processing, consciousness
  • It All Begins With Attitude - 2,804 words
    It All Begins With Attitude IT ALL BEGINS WITH ATTITUDE from the seminar BREAKING THROUGH LIFE'S BOUNDARIES by Pat Spithill Seminar Leader * Author * Keynote Speaker (C) Copyright, 1989, Pat Spithill P.O. Box 505 * Hutchins, Texas 75141 214-225-8051 This material may not be reproduced or altered without written permission of the author and copyright holder. The Importance of Attitude The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word "attitude" as "a mental position or feeling with regard to an object." The mental positions or feelings are our thoughts, beliefs and opinions. The object is life. In other words, attitudes encompass all of the thoughts, beliefs and opinions which people have about ...
    Related: positive attitude, webster dictionary, people change, went wrong, complaining
  • It All Begins With Attitude - 2,625 words
    ... efs. Each of these things has an influence over how we perceive life. Worksheet No. 1 covered where you are now. Worksheet No. 2 will be your design for everyday from this point forward. Creating new attitudes can be likened to a high jump bar. For these new expectations to become part of you, it is important that the sights not initially be set too low or too high. It's important to believe in the new attitudes and to believe in their realization. This helps reduce the cognitive dissonance. Once strong expectations become a way of life, you can raise the bar again and again. ATTITUDES WORKSHEET NO. 2 As you answer each of the questions below, stop for a few moments and do your best to p ...
    Related: learning process, personal choice, personal growth, louise, spouse
  • The Madness Of Prince Hamlet - 1,077 words
    The madness of prince Hamlet In Hamlet, Prince of Denmark the protagonist exhibits a puzzling duplicitous nature. Hamlet contradicts himself throughout out the play. He endorses both of the virtues of acting a role and being true to oneis self. He further supports both of these conflicting endorsements with his actions. This ambiguity is demonstrated by his alleged madness, for he does behave madly, only to become perfectly calm and rational an instant later. These inconsistencies are related with the internal dilemmas he faces. He struggles with the issue of revenging his fatheris death, vowing to kill Claudius and then backing out, several times. Upon this point Hamlet teeters through the ...
    Related: hamlet, hamlet prince of denmark, madness, prince, prince hamlet
  • The Movie Quiz Show - 1,355 words
    The Movie Quiz Show Chernette Lewis Social Psychology December 15, 2000 In the movie "Quiz Show" The television game show "Twenty-one" was rigged to keep ratings up at NBC. At the beginning of the movie question for the show were seen taken from a bank volt. This gave the viewer the impression that no one saw the question before Jack (the host) received them from the guards weekly. Herbert Stempel, a Jewish contestant, he won for eight weeks on the show had become a national celebrity, to the audience he seemed unstoppable. When the rating fell the producers of the game show decided to get a more attractive contestant. So, they set out to find a new contestant. Charles Van Doreen became thei ...
    Related: quiz, show business, district attorney, york times, resolve
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