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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cognitive development

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  • Cognitive Development - 1,091 words
    Cognitive Development Cognitive development is very crucial in the development of a child. A friend of mine, Julie just recently had a perfect baby boy. Since Julie found out she was pregnant she has been reading book after book, each book that she has read talks about cognitive development, but never really explains what cognitive development is or how to improve ones development. Julie has asked me to help her to understand what she can do to give Hunter the best optimal cognitive development though out his life. I'm going to start by telling Julie exactly what cognitive development is, the four stages of cognitive development and what kinds of activities to do together as he gets older. I ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive development, cognitive learning, motor skills, social interaction
  • During The 1920s, A Biologist Named Jean Piaget Proposed A Theory Of Cognitive Development Of Children He Caused A New Revolu - 1,646 words
    During the 1920s, a biologist named Jean Piaget proposed a theory of cognitive development of children. He caused a new revolution in thinking about how thinking develops. In 1984, Piaget observed that children understand concepts and reason differently at different stages. Piaget stated children's cognitive strategies which are used to solve problems, reflect an interaction BETWEEN THE CHILD'S CURRENT DEVELOPMENTAL STAGE AND experience in the world. Research on cognitive development has provided science educators with constructive information regarding student capacities for meeting science curricular goals. Students which demonstrate concrete operational thinking on Piagetian tasks seem to ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive development, jean, jean piaget, piaget
  • Physical Development - 886 words
    1.) There are 4 types of development. Physical development covers the learning of the ability to walk. It also encompasses all muscle development, and the idea that the person generally becomes more physically efficient over time. Cognitive development deals with the development of a way to think. For example, an infant tends to over generalize information. If he sees an animal and is told that it is a dog, any furry animal with 4 legs and a tale will be considered a dog. As cognitive development progresses, a person learns to be specific. We also build a sense of problem solving. Personal development refers to the changes in an individual's personality. As time progresses, and people learn ...
    Related: cognitive development, personal development, physical development, social development, building blocks
  • Child Development - 1,552 words
    Child Development Is development the result of genetics or the result of the love, guidance and the upbringing one receives? That is a very interesting and personal question. In reviewing Table 4.1 in the textbook regarding where the main developmental theories stand on the six themes in development, it appears that most of the theorists involved believe that both nature and nurture have an impact on the development of the child (Child Development: A Thematic Approach (3rd. ed.) (Bukato, Daehler, 1998, p.29). The Ethological theme reports that although behavior is biologically based the environment has an impact and influences behavior patterns. Most of the other themes such as the Learning ...
    Related: child protective, cognitive development, emotional development, intellectual development, language development
  • Children's Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten - 1,388 words
    Children'S Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten Michael Burkhardt Page 2 From an ecological perspective, early childhood development occurs within the multiple contexts of the home, the school, and the neighborhood, and aspects of these environments can contribute to the development of adjustment problems (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). A child's psychological adjustment to entry into school for the first time can have a significant impact on the level of success achieved later in life. Children rated higher in school adjustment by their elementary school teachers, as a result of improved cognitive development, showed positive attitudes toward school resulting in better school perform ...
    Related: adjustment, children's, entry, kindergarten, psychological, psychological adjustment
  • Comparing Piaget And Erikson - 925 words
    Comparing Piaget And Erikson Comparing Piagets Stages of Cognitive Development to Eriksons Stages of Social Development Child psychologist, Jean Piaget, believed that a person understands whatever information fits into his established view of the world. Piaget described four stages of cognitive development and related them to a persons ability to understand. The Sensorimotor Stage occurs from birth to 2 years. It is during this stage that the child learns about his or herself and the environment around them by use of motor and reflex actions. The Preoperational Stage begins from about the time the child starts to talk to about age 7. With the childs new knowledge of language, he is able to b ...
    Related: comparing, erik erikson, erikson, jean piaget, piaget
  • Comparison Between Environmental And - 1,003 words
    Comparison Between Environmental And Intelligence is the level of competence, ability to learn or to some people it is how well an individual performs on an IQ test. The structure of intelligence is best subdivided into two significant categories. They are environmental and hereditary influences. Environmental differences can be divided into different factors. The deprivation model of social class and intelligence consists of three variables. These variables explain, in terms of environmental factors, development and performance which are correlated with social status. The first of these variables consists of the combination of birth order, nutrition, and prenatal care. Children who are firs ...
    Related: comparison, environmental, environmental factors, more important, cognitive development
  • Comparison Between Environmental And - 1,023 words
    ... tive if they are begun early in the life of the child. The reason behind that is that the programs are better able to create lifelong changes in capacity to generate and sustain responses to cognitive stimulation. These programs entail the development of visual and auditory competence as well as encourage attention and labeling which help cognitive development in children. Storfer notes the Drash and Stolberg experiment were it was found that extraordinary high competence, emotional maturity and speech development were attained by children as a result of an enrichment program designed to modify the behavior of parents during the first year of their childs life. The Stanford Binet scores ...
    Related: comparison, environmental, environmental factors, environmental influences, first year
  • Ego And Personality - 1,673 words
    EGO And Personality The ego, a word that is arbitrarily used by mean, has a quite distinct and significant meaning. Ego development is an aspect of psychology that has been discussed by a number of authors and psychologist. Many different authors have concluded a variety of theories behind the ego and its many stages and its effects upon ones personality. According to Zimbardo (1992) Freuds theory showed that personality differences arise from the different ways in which people deal with their fundamental drives. To explain theses differences, Freud pictured a continuing battle between two antagonistic parts of the personality, the id and the superego. The id is conceived of as the storehous ...
    Related: healthy personality, personality, personality development, judicial branch, freudian theory
  • Elementary Phys Ed - 1,039 words
    Elementary Phys. Ed The effect of physical education on elementary students is noticeable through all types of skill development. From personal experiences, people can conclude that there is more to games and activities than just expending energy to relieve and calm younger children. The main focus of my ideas is mainly directed towards motor skills, relationships and how they contribute to student learning, and setting and achieving goals as well as the five areas to which I set beliefs, theories, and assumptions. Children, especially young, need to learn basic motor skills to make their physical life easier when they get older. Sometimes motor skills come to us phylogenetically, such as wa ...
    Related: elementary, phys, cognitive development, gifted students, receiver
  • I Introduction - 1,792 words
    I. Introduction Lori is four year old, and she is at Piagets preoperational stage. According to Piagets description of the preoperational stage children, they cannot understand his conservation tasks. This preoperational stage, "children can use representations (mental images, drawings, words, gestures) rather than just motor actions to think about objects and events. Thinking now is faster, more flexible and efficient, and more socially shared. Thinking is limited by egocentrism, a focus on perceptual states, reliance on appearances rather than underlying realities, and rigidity (lack of reversibility)" (Flavell, miller, 1993). The young children do not have abilities to have "operations me ...
    Related: young child, cognitive development, care center, piaget, modification
  • Intellectual Development Ofyoung Children - 1,586 words
    Intellectual Development Ofyoung Children In two separate issues of "Time" magazine, the intellectual development of infants and preschoolers was analyzed with contrasting viewpoints regarding the development of their brains and the views regarding how best to encourage the cognitive abilities of these young children. In the earlier issue, dated February 3, 1997, the special report consisting of two articles titled "Fertile Minds" and "The Day-Care Dilemma" the theories of Jean Piaget's cognitive-development are supported. In the latter issue, dated October 19, 1998, the special report titled "How to Make a Better Student" focused on refuting the theories supported in the earlier issue of th ...
    Related: cognitive development, intellectual, intellectual development, preschool children, young children
  • Jean Piaget - 1,182 words
    Jean Piaget This paper revolves around developmental psychologist Jean Piaget and his work. While swaying from the personal to the professional sides of the Swiss psychologist, the research touches on key influences that inspired young Piaget to become such a driven and well respected psychologist. However, the most extensive part of this paper is the explanation of his cognitive development theory and how it evolved. The three main pieces to Piaget`s puzzle of cognitive development that are discussed are schemes, assimilation and accommodation, and the stages of cognitive growth. In addition to the material on the man and his theory, there is the most important component of the paper, the w ...
    Related: jean, jean piaget, piaget, alfred binet, reference list
  • Jean Piaget - 1,182 words
    ... tages of the child`s cognitive growth. While both the assimilation and accommodation processes are responsible for establishing a perfect cognitive fit between the scheme and the information, each completes the process in different manners, hence the need for two different terms. Assimilation reconfigures the new data to fit with existing schemes, and the accommodation process restructures a child`s schemes to accommodate the new environmental information. As Piaget states, Accommodation [is] the adjustment of the scheme to the particular situation.He goes on to give an example of the two processes: An infant who`s just discovered he can grasp what he sees (will then assimilate) everythi ...
    Related: jean, jean piaget, piaget, concrete operational stage, chicago press
  • Jerome Bruner - 471 words
    Jerome Bruner Jerome S. Bruner "The father of cognitive psychology" Area of Development and Theory Cognitive Development, Constructivist Theory Key Concepts Discovery Learning, Categories, Coding System, Conceptual Change, Spiral Curriculum, Outline Discovery Learning The acquisition of new information or knowledge largely as a result of the learners own efforts. Discovery is contrasted with expository or reception learning. It is an important instructional tool of the constructivist classroom. I. Discovery Learning is how we make sense of the world. A. Categories A grouping of related objects or events. A category is both a concept and precept. It classifies things as equal. B. Coding S ...
    Related: bruner, jerome, cognitive psychology, direct instruction, iconic
  • Lawrence - 1,095 words
    Lawrence Kohlberg Lawrence Kohlberg conducted research on moral development, using surveys as his major source of assessment. He presented surveys with moral dilemmas and asked his subjects to evaluate the moral conflict. In developing his theory, he made an intensive study using the same survey techniques of the bases on which children and youths of various ages make moral decisions. He found that moral growth also begins early in life and proceeds in stages throughout adulthood and beyond which is until the day we die. Influenced by Piaget's concept of stages, Kohlberg's theory was created based on the idea that stages of moral development build on each other in order of importance and sig ...
    Related: lawrence, cognitive development, jean piaget, local community, fundamental
  • Midwifery Profession: Pros And Cons - 829 words
    Midwifery Profession: Pros And Cons Support for the Midwifery Profession: Pros and Cons The tradition of midwifery virtually disappeared in Canada during the early part of this century. Several generations of women gave up childbirth at home to the medical profession. They did this in the name of safety and pain relief, or simply because the option of being cared for by a midwife no longer existed. Midwifery should be re-instated as a legal and honourable profession. With healthy pregnancies and under normal conditions, women should give birth at home with the professional assistance of a midwife. The most common argument against home births and midwifery are perpetuated by the medical estab ...
    Related: cons, midwifery, pros, personal experience, medical profession
  • Mill And Kants Theories - 1,643 words
    Mill And Kant's Theories John Stuart Mill (1808-73) believed in an ethical theory known as utilitarianism. There are many formulation of this theory. One such is, "Everyone should act in such a way to bring the largest possibly balance of good over evil for everyone involved." However, good is a relative term. What is good? Utilitarians disagreed on this subject. Mill made a distinction between happiness and sheer sensual pleasure. He defines happiness in terms of higher order pleasure (i.e. social enjoyments, intellectual). In his Utilitarianism (1861), Mill described this principle as follows:According to the Greatest Happiness Principle ... The ultimate end, end, with reference to and for ...
    Related: immanuel kant, john stuart mill, mill, stuart mill, modern society
  • Once Upon A Psychological Theory - 2,118 words
    Once Upon A Psychological Theory Once Upon A Psychological Theory An Analysis of Psychological Hypotheses in Fairy Tales and Their Affect on Childhood Development INDEX I. Personal Statement II. Introduction III. Piaget A. Childhood Development i. Sensory-Motor Stage ii. Preoperational Stage ii. Stage Of Concrete Operations iii. Stage Of Formal Operations IV. Erikson A. Autonomy And Social Development i. Theory ii. The Goose Girl V. Freud A. The Id, The Ego And The Super Ego i. Theory ii. The Three Little Pigs B. Oedipus i. The Myth Of Oedipus ii. Theory ii. Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs iii. Cinderella iv. Rapunzel VI. Conclusion VII. Bibliography PERSONAL STATEMENT The object of psycholo ...
    Related: psychological, psychological development, psychological theory, stage theory, social development
  • Piaget - 1,432 words
    Piaget Cognitive abilities to retrieve immediate knowledge and experience of the pre -operational child (age 2 - 6) A Cross - Cultural Study Introduction The project is based on Piagets stage theory of cognitive development Prediction Based on Piagets theory, children during the pre - operational stage have acquired the ability to stand apart and view themselves from another persons perspective. They are able to describe themselves as different from other children by listing their unique characteristics, especially the fact that their names are different. They develop a more complex understanding of themselves, such as age, name, family etc.. During the same stage children become aware of an ...
    Related: piaget, more important, family values, basic books, fail
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