Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: clinical research

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  • Baby Eye Testing - 557 words
    Baby Eye Testing U OF T PROFESSORS DEVISE BETTER WAY TO TEST SIGHT IN BABIES In a darkened room at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, a baby, its head dotted with electrodes, sits in its mother's lap and watches flashing black and white checkerboards and stripes on a television screen. Soon after the test, doctors will know if the child can see and how well it can see. The testing procedure, which involves measuring brain wave activity prompted by visual stimuli (also called visual evoked potentials or VEP's) has been perfected by Drs. Barry Skarf of the Department of Ophthalmology and Moshe Eizenman of U of T's Institute Their procedure is more accurate than tests used elsewhere because ...
    Related: testing, research council, bottom line, basic research, cues
  • Brca Brca - 2,261 words
    ... ient pamphlet) When BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is inherited it is considered a dominant factor. People receive one BRCA1 allele from their mom and one BRCA1 allele from their dad. The same goes for any other gene pairs. BRCA1 is not just inherited by women, but men as well. It is NOT a sex-linked trait. In order to study how organisms inherit genes, health care professionals use a Punnet square in order to understand how people inherit a gene. Finding out if a person does have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is another process. (Myriad Genetic Pamphlet) DIAGRAM 5 Inherited alleles of family tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to particular types of cancer; this is one of the reasons why ...
    Related: york macmillan, york harper, health care, specificity, bias
  • Canadas Declining Health Care System And The Brain Drain - 883 words
    Canadas Declining Health Care System And The Brain Drain Canada's Declining Health Care System and the Brain Drain Canada's government-funded health care system in under attack. Despite the mandate of the Canada health act, which was meant to assure universality, comprehensiveness, equitable access, public administration and portability of our health care system, (Braithwaite 17), Canadians today make the issue of health care their most important political concern. One of the biggest crises the Canadian health care system faces is for strange reasons not in the spotlight when debating the issues, that is the brain drain-Canada losing highly skilled physicians and health care workers to other ...
    Related: brain, canada health, canadian health, care system, declining, drain, health
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Creatine Monohydrate - 1,278 words
    Creatine Monohydrate Everyday a new nutrition supplement or a new diet is introduced to the public. In recent years and months, many people have started to take a larger interest in their personal health and exercise. Creatine Monohydrate is still the most popular and controversial nutrition supplement on the market today. This paper will include a background for creatine monohydrate because not everyone knows what it is. The paper will also include information and criticisms from a recent nutritional article on creatine monohydrate that was researched for this paper. Creatine monohydrate was introduced to the public approximately two years ago. When it first came out on the market it made a ...
    Related: creatine, associate professor, short term, amino acids, overview
  • Marfan Syndrome - 1,398 words
    Marfan Syndrome Marfans syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue. Marfans syndrome effects the skeleton, lungs, eyes, heart, and blood vessels. It can also effect men and women of any race or ethnic group. Marfans can have fatal consequences and outcomes. It effects one out of every thousand. Marfans syndrome damages the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and ocular systems of a patient. Without proper diagnosis and treatment, a persons life with Marfans syndrome could become endangered. Dr. Antoice Marfan discovered Marfans syndrome in 1896. Through the years the technology to increase the life expectancy of its patients has grown. It is the most common inherited disorder. Marfan syndrome ...
    Related: syndrome, cardiovascular system, blood pressure, pregnant woman, protein
  • Marijuana - 1,551 words
    Marijuana Thesis Marijuana is a substance that has become very much a part of American culture. Nearly 65 million Americans have either used it occasionally or regularly. The use of marijuana hit mainstream America about thirty years ago and it has been accepted by a large segment of society ever since (Rosenthal 16). The debate on whether this substance should be legalized or not remains a very hot topic today. Despite government efforts to isolate and eliminate its use, it is clear that the use of marijuana is still very popular. There is an obvious problem concerning marijuana today. Governments on all three levels: local, state, and federal are trying desperately to find an appropriate p ...
    Related: marijuana, marijuana illegal, marijuana laws, medicinal marijuana, black market
  • Medical Testing On Animals - 839 words
    Medical Testing On Animals Animals have been used in medical research for centuries. In a recent count, it was determined that 8,815 animals were being used for research at MSU, 8,503 of them rodents - rats, mice, hamsters and gerbils. There were 18 dogs, three cats and a variety of goats, ferrets, pigeons and rabbits. The struggle against this tyranny is a struggle as important as any of the moral and social issues that have been fought over in recent years." Animal rights are an emotional issue-second only, perhaps, to the bitter abortion debate." For decades the value of animal research has been grossly overrated. Although researchers have depended on animal test data to achieve medical a ...
    Related: american medical, animal research, animal rights, medical association, medical research, medical science, testing
  • Melatonin - 1,166 words
    Melatonin It seems as though every time we turn around there is a new health fad, be it a drug, herb or diet. Within the past 10 years the drug melatonin has hit the market and seems to have made quite a splash with the public and the media. At a time when an estimated thirty to forty million Americans suffer from serious sleep disorders that interfere with their sleep quality and health, many are desperate for an easy solution (Sleep Foundation 1). The media claims that this wonder drug melatonin is the answer to these sleep disorders and also can prevent several illnesses. But is melatonin really safe enough for the public to experiment with? How much is known about what it does and its si ...
    Related: vital signs, sleep disorders, clinical research, health, seasonal
  • Orphan Drugs - 1,782 words
    Orphan Drugs The term orphan drug refers to a product that treats a rare disease affecting fewer than 200,000 Americans. Orphan drugs help the companies that manufacture them, under the Orphan drug act. Under the act a small company can pick up a product that would be worth anywhere from $5 million to $20 million a year. The orphan drug act has helped in the development of products to treat drug addiction, leprosy, hemophilia, and rare cancers, as well as diseases most people have never heard of, such as cryptosporidiosis (an infection caused by a protozoan parasite found in animals' intestines that causes diarrhea, fever, weight loss, and lymph node enlargement) and neurocysticerosis. In th ...
    Related: drug addiction, drugs, orphan, lymph node, weight loss
  • Placebos - 1,343 words
    Placebos A placebo is defined as an inactive substance resembling a medication, given for psychological effect or as a control in evaluating a medicine believed to be active. However the placebo only fits this description under the restraints it has been given by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which refers to the placebo as an investigational new drug. In actuality, up until the present much of medicine was built on placebos. "Not very long ago, the rituals and symbols of healing constituted the bulk of the physicians armamentarium. In the early decades of the 20th century, most of the medication that doctors carried in their little black bags and kept in their office cabinets had li ...
    Related: placebo effect, york times, little black, long beach, beach
  • U Of T Professors Devise Better Way To Test Sight In Babies - 553 words
    U of T professors devise better way to test sight in babies In a darkened room at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, a baby, its head dotted with electrodes, sits in its mother's lap and watches flashing black and white checkerboards and stripes on a television screen. Soon after the test, doctors will know if the child can see and how well it can see. The testing procedure, which involves measuring brain wave activity prompted by visual stimuli (also called visual evoked potentials or VEP's) has been perfected by Drs. Barry Skarf of the Department of Ophthalmology and Moshe Eizenman of U of T's Institute Their procedure is more accurate than tests used elsewhere because Eizenman has deve ...
    Related: devise, professors, computer program, bottom line, invented
  • U Of T Professors Devise Better Way To Test Sight In Babies In A Darkened Room At Torontos Hospital For Sick Children, A Baby - 554 words
    U OF T PROFESSORS DEVISE BETTER WAY TO TEST SIGHT IN BABIES In a darkened room at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, a baby, its head dotted with electrodes, sits in its mother's lap and watches flashing black and white checkerboards and stripes on a television screen. Soon after the test, doctors will know if the child can see and how well it can see. The testing procedure, which involves measuring brain wave activity prompted by visual stimuli (also called visual evoked potentials or VEP's) has been perfected by Drs. Barry Skarf of the Department of Ophthalmology and Moshe Eizenman of U of T's Institute Their procedure is more accurate than tests used elsewhere because Eizenman has deve ...
    Related: devise, professors, large numbers, young children, disorders
  • Why I Got Into Medicine - 625 words
    Why I Got Into Medicine I grew up in a research and development campus where my father is a scientist. Research and curiosity were constantly encouraged and this prompted me to take up medicine as a career, a field that offers tremendous prospects for research and discoveries. Throughout medical school I tried to be involved in research and attempts at trying out new ideas, be it in the lab or working with human subjects. I carried this through my residency and now my fellowship. The idea of studying a topic or issue that has so far not been treaded upon seems to be extremely exciting and challenging. I have always wanted to be a scientist and contribute something to the human cause and what ...
    Related: medicine, cancer patient, training program, academic institution, genuine
  • Wilderness Ethics - 418 words
    Wilderness Ethics Lavar McCullough February 11, 2000 Essay #2 Wilderness Ethics Wildlife can be found all over the world. Animals come in all shapes and sizes and some still havent even been accounted for. Animals were on this planet long before man, but they may not be here when man leaves. The animals downfall results from the extensive studying, exploitation, and the destruction of their habitats, which should be against the law. There is a lot of information that can still be learned about certain species of animals. This information is good, only if it furthers human knowledge and the animals well being. Studies done on animals involve clinical research. Taking an animal out of the wild ...
    Related: ethics, wilderness, more harm, human knowledge, altering
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