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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: clement

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  • A History Of Christianity In Egypt - 1,119 words
    A History of Christianity in Egypt A History of Christianity in Egypt The history of Christianity in Egypt dates back verily to the beginnings of Christianity itself. Many Christians hold that Christianity was brought to Egypt by the Apostle Saint Mark in the early part of the first century AD. Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, in his Ecclesiastic History states that Saint Mark first came to Egypt between the first and third year of the reign of Emperor Claudius, which would make it sometime between AD 41 and 44, and that he returned to Alexandria some twenty years later to preach and evangelize. Saint Mark's first convert in Alexandria was Anianus, a shoemaker who later was consecrated a bishop ...
    Related: christianity, egypt, history, upper egypt, emperor constantine
  • Abuses Of The Medieval Catholic Clergy - 1,431 words
    Abuses of the Medieval Catholic Clergy The Dark Ages of Europe were called such for several reasons. One of the more notorious reasons was the state of the Catholic Church. In the years before the Reformation, members of the Catholic clergy had reached an all time low in terms of their morality. The abuses of clerical power and privileges by the medieval clergy spanned all parts of their daily lives. Members of the Catholic clergy were financially, politically and socially corrupt. Each of these corruptions made up the enormous religious corruption that was the logical result of such debauchery. Of the several grievances against the Church, [t]he first and sorest was that she loved money, an ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, clergy, medieval, ordinary people
  • Antisemitism Influence - 2,194 words
    ... od alone operating from within, and not of man working-or rather playing-from without. If these offences be taken away, worse will follow. For they are thus given over by the wrath of God to reprobation, that they may become incorrigible, as Ecclesiastes says, for every one who is incorrigible is rendered worse rather than better by correction. Farewell in the Lord; pardon my words, and pray the Lord for my sinning soul." "Martin Luther's to George Spalatin," from Luthers Correspondence and Other Contemporary, Letters, trans. by P. Smith (1913), Vol. 1, pp. 28-29. www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1514luther.html So we see he was absolutely determined that the Jews would and should convert to ...
    Related: antisemitism, lord jesus, german people, the bible, omitted
  • Bacon, Roger - 442 words
    Bacon, Roger Roger Bacon was an English Scholastic philosopher, scientist and one of the most influential teachers of the 13th century. He was born in Ilchester, Somersetshire in 1214. Roger Bacon was educated at the universities of Oxford and Paris. He remained in Paris after completing his studies and taught for a while at the University of Paris. When he returned to England in about 1251, he entered the religious order of the Franciscans and lived at Oxford. He carried on active studies and did experimental research in alchemy, optics, and astronomy. Bacon was critical of the methods of learning of the times, and in the late 1260s, at the request of Pope Clement IV, he wrote his Opus Maju ...
    Related: roger, roger bacon, franciscan order, experimental research, oxford
  • Barnabas - 966 words
    Barnabas Barnabas was a native of the island of Cyprus. His birthplace makes him a Jew of the Diaspora, the dispersion of Jews outside Palestine or modern Israel. He was originally named Joseph but the apostles called him Barnabas, he probably acquired this name because of his ability as a preacher. The name Barnabas was understood by Luke to mean Son of Encouragement (Acts 4:36). Barnabas was an apostle of the secondary group, companion of Paul on his mission to Cyprus and the Pisidian mainland. Barnabas first appears in Luke's account of communal living in the Jerusalem church, as a man of some means who gave to the church the proceeds from the sale of a piece land, Barnabas sold a field h ...
    Related: barnabas, abingdon press, zondervan publishing house, missionary journey, galatians
  • Biography On Michelangelo - 879 words
    Biography On Michelangelo "Trifles make perfections, and perfection is no trifle," Michelangelo once stated. He is one of the greatest artists of all time and is unmatched by any other. Michelangelo is the creator of works of sublime beauty that express the full breadth of human condition. Yet, he was caught between conflicting powers and whims of his patrons, the Medici's of Florence and Papacy's in Rome. Michelangelo was born on the sixth of March in 1475, the second of five brothers in a small town called Caprese, in Tuscany. He always considered himself to be a Florentine, as did his father. Francesca Neri, his mother, was sick and frail. As a result, he stayed with a nurse in a family o ...
    Related: biography, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, last judgment, sistine ceiling
  • Bob Marley - 1,877 words
    Bob Marley Jamaica has produced an artist who has touched all categories, classes, and creeds through innate modesty and profound wisdom. Bob Marley, the Natural Mystic who introduced reggae to European and American fans still may prove to be the most significant musical artist of the twentieth century. Bob Marley gave the world brilliant music and established reggae as major forces in music that is comparable with the blues and rock&rolls. His work stretched across nearly two decades and still remains timeless. Bob Marley & the Wailers worked their way into all of our lives. "He's taken his place with James Brown and Sly Stone as pervasive influence on r&b", said Timothy White, author of th ...
    Related: bob marley, marley, nesta marley, unborn child, prime minister
  • Book Of Galations - 1,070 words
    ... , since it could be viewed that Paul was challenging creation beliefs, internal criticisms most likely also existed. It could have been for these reasons that Paul rethought what he expressed in his writings after Galatians. On a more specific level a certain situation in Corinth could have given rise to Paul reevaluating his stance on the role of women. In Corinth there were some women who were not upholding traditions and instead were wearing their hair unbound. At the time a woman who wore her hair unbound was often seen as type of cult member. Paul most likely understood the dire effects that this could have on the early church. If other people saw this unbound hair that was often co ...
    Related: jesus christ, christian writings, different aspects, prophetic, woman
  • Bubonic Plague - 1,197 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic plague is a contagious disease, which can reach epidemic proportions, transmitted to humans by the fleas of an infected rat. The most telltale sign of the plague is the enlarged lymph nodes in the groin, armpit, or neck. The name for the Bubonic plague originated from the name for the swollen lymph nodes: Buboes. The disease is also called the Black Death. The reason for this nickname might have been the black spots on the skin or the purplish tint on an infected persons skin. The Black Death is known as the most fatal disease of the middle ages. The bacteria called Yersinia Pestis causes the disease. The whole cycle begins with an infected rat. A rat flea (Xenopsy ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, biological warfare, middle ages
  • Caligula: The Madness Of A Goat - 1,117 words
    Caligula: The Madness of a Goat Many studies have been made on the emperor Gaius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, or "Caligula." He was professed to be the maddest, and cruelest of all Roman emperors. As emperor, Caligula put the imperial treasury in severe debt, performed acts of insanity, and committed scandalous sexual acts. The ludicrous deeds he participated in, and carried out left the Roman Empire in infamy. During the reign of Tiberius, the captain of his bodyguards Sejanus began a campaign of extreme and devious means. He desired the Roman throne and so, started to eliminate his competition. The first to go was Drusus, Tiberiuss heir. Sejanus then took out other key contenders for the th ...
    Related: goat, madness, julius caesar, roman empire, costly
  • Charles V - 2,540 words
    Charles V Emperor Charles V (CHARLES I, King of SPAIN). Born at Ghent, 1500; died at Yuste, in Spain, 1558; was a descendant of the house of Hapsburg, and to this descent owed his sovereignty over so many lands that it was said of him that the sun never set on his dominions. Charles was the son of Philip, Duke of Burgundy, by Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, and Burgundy was the first heritage to which he at his led, on his fathers death in 1506. As he was a minor at that time, his aunt, Margaret of Austria, undertook the regency for him. William of Chivres, his father's chief counsellor, had charge of the prince's household; Adrian of Utrecht, the Humanist and professor of theolo ...
    Related: charles i, charles v, police system, political power, siege
  • Charles V - 2,533 words
    ... fided to a bureau of commerce (casa de contratacion) in Seville; but at the same time he established in Spain a special political Council of the Indies. In the colonies two viceroyalties and twenty-nine governments, four archbishoprics, and twenty-four bishoprics were gradually organized. Already of all those great problems had arisen which still vex colonial politics - the question, how far the mother country should monopolize the products of the colonies; the question colonization; the question of the treatment of the natives, doubly difficult because on the one hand their labour was indispensable and on the other it was most unwilling; the question, how Christianity and civilization m ...
    Related: charles v, the duke, spanish crown, north african, masses
  • Christian Church In Middle Ages - 1,477 words
    Christian Church In Middle Ages The Christian Church in the Middle Ages played a significant role in society. Unfortunately though, the church is often regarded as the capital of corruption, evil, and worldliness. Today, so many people depict the medieval church as being led by materialistic popes, devouring tithes from poverty-stricken peasants, having various illegitimate children, and granting indulgences for money from wayward believers. Yes, circumstances like this may have been the case, and is often hard to disapprove, considering the fact that this notion is often advocated in movies. But we must open our mind, and look at the situations first before jumping to conclusions. As many t ...
    Related: christian, christian church, church history, medieval church, middle ages
  • Church Of England - 921 words
    Church of England Since the Reformation, the Church of England or Anglican Church has been the established branch of the Christian church in England. Throughout the medieval period, English kings tried to limit the power of the church and the claims of its independent canon law. All of this was without success until the reign of Henry VIII. Parliament's acts between 1529 and 1536 represent the beginning of the Anglican Church as a national church, independent of papal jurisdiction. Henry VIII, troubled by the refusal of Pope Clement VII to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, induced Parliament to enact a series of statutes that denied the pope any power or jurisdiction over the Church ...
    Related: anglican church, catholic church, christian church, church and state, church of england, eastern orthodox church, english church
  • Eudora Weltys The Robber Bridegroom - 904 words
    Eudora Welty's The Robber Bridegroom Eudora Welty's first novel, The Robber Bridegroom, is a combination of fantasy and reality while exploring the duality of human nature, time, and the word man lives in. The union of legend, Mississippi history and Grimms' fairy tales create an adult dream world. Every character in the story has little insight to themselves and how they relate to the world around them. The antics of Mike Fink, the Harps, the bandits, and the Indians closely relate to Mississippi folklore. The blending of actual history and pure fantasy create a much richer form of entertainment. Mike Fink was an American frontiersman who is said to have beaten Davy Crockett in a shooting c ...
    Related: eudora, eudora welty, robber, peter lang, human nature
  • Evelina By Frances Burney The Perfection Of Femininity - 1,375 words
    Evelina (By Frances Burney) - The Perfection Of Femininity EVELINA: PERFECTION OF FEMININITY When Frances Burney wrote Evelina in the Eighteenth Century, she was able to capture the essence of what it meant to be a female at this time in history. Throughout the novel, the character of Evelina captures the hearts of those around her. Mr. Villars describes Evelina as this artless young creature, with too much beauty to escape notice (19). The character of Evelina encompasses the traits attributed to the description of the female gender. These traits include a focus on the importance of reputation; a lack of passion; and distinct physical attributes. Above all else, Evelina holds her reputation ...
    Related: burney, femininity, perfection, important role, century society
  • Extended Essay - 2,792 words
    EXTENDED ESSAY Asian Philosophies of Critical Thinking: divergent or convergent to western establishments? By Clement Ng SCHOOL CODE: 1206 (Sha Tin College) CANDIDATE CODE: MAY 2003 1206 038 Abstract The research question of this extended essay came across at a very early stage in my life. Having been born and developed from a family with all its members being University instructors and professors, I was often involved in arguments related to the lack of critical thinking in Asian cultures. As I got older, having had the chance to emerge in different cultures, I started to develop my own viewpoints and answers. I started to wonder about the truth between the real differences of Asian and We ...
    Related: research question, chinese history, cultural environment, personally, classification
  • Florence,italy - 799 words
    Florence,Italy Florence is located in central Italy. Florence was built on both sides of the Arno River, which causes flooding from time to time. Florence has many hills there hills which cause a very changeable type of climate with the help of the Arno River. Summers are hot and humid, and winters cool and wet. There are many advantages to having the city where it is at. The city was about 145 miles northwest of Rome, which is an important city to trade with. The Arno river gives Italy easy access to water and trade from the river to the Meditarian sea. The hills of the city offered some protection from outside invasions. Florence started out in 59 B.C. as a colony for soldiers for the Roma ...
    Related: roman empire, police chief, leonardo da vinci, flooding, sculptor
  • French New Wave - 1,238 words
    French New Wave The French New Wave was a movement that lasted between 1959 to 1964. It all started with the Cinematheque Francois, an underground organization that would regularly show older films from around the world. This beget the cine-club, and by the 1954 there were 100,000 members in 200 clubs. From these clubs several magazines were created, the most famous of these were LEcran Francois, La Revue du Cinema, Postif, and the world known Cahiers du Cinema. One of the two most influential people during this time was Alexandre Astruc who declared that, the cinema is becoming a means of expression like the other arts before it, especially painting and the novel. It is no longer a spectacl ...
    Related: wave, german expressionism, love story, francois truffaut, nazi
  • Hamlet And Claude - 1,142 words
    Hamlet And Claude In the play "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare, the character of Claude is a near perfect example of a Machiavellian character. Claude began as the brother to King Hamlet, stepbrother to Queen Gertrude and Uncle to Prince Hamlet. However this situation obviously does not suite Claude so he takes measures to change it. After doing what he had to too become King, Claudes brother is dead, he is married to Gertrude and Prince Hamlet is now his son-in-law. In this fashion he has demonstrated the golden rule of Machiavelli. That rule is to obtain power by all means necessary and to keep that power by all means necessary. However after Claude gains his power he does not do a good job ...
    Related: claude, hamlet, king hamlet, prince hamlet, william shakespeare
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