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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: classical music

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  • Classical Music - 606 words
    Classical Music Classical Music, popular term for the Western tradition of art music that began in Europe in the Middle Ages and continues today. It includes symphonies, chamber music, opera, and other serious, artistic music. More narrowly, the "classical" style refers to the work of the Viennese classical school, a group of 18th-century composers that includes Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Ludwig van Beethoven, which is the epitome of what is called classical music. Choral Music, music sung by a group of people, using two or more singers to perform each musical line. The term part-song is used for vocal music having one singer for each part. Choral music is written for c ...
    Related: african music, chamber music, classical, classical music, classical school, music
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Critique Of Two Concerts - 1,695 words
    A Critique Of Two Concerts Music is one of the most unique performing arts due to the way it has evolved. Styles and melodies considered unfit in one era are displayed prominently in another. The two concerts previewed in this report have two different and distinct techniques. The first performance that I attended was a symphonic concert playing a mix of contemporary and early 20th century works at Carnegie Hall. The second performance was an organ recital highlighted by the by the live performance of Bach's most well known pieces. Hopefully this term paper will objectively and subjectively critique and compare the two performances. An orchestra is a collection of a variety of instruments us ...
    Related: critique, baroque music, small group, renaissance music, horrific
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
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  • Albert Einsteinman Of Vision - 1,905 words
    Albert Einstein-Man Of Vision Albert Einstein: Man of Vision Albert Einstein, perhaps the greatest mind ever to have walked the face of the earth, was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. As a boy, he hated school, and felt that the regimented and repetitive nature of schooling in Germany at that time had any promise of helping his future. He did not do well in school, mainly because he did not care to learn what was being taught to him. While he seemed to be a bright child, his schoolwork did not interest him, but at the same time the simple compass that his father owned fascinated him. Albert constantly harassed his father and his Uncle Jake with questions concerning how the compass wor ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, edwin hubble, teaching methods, discovering
  • Beethoven - 652 words
    Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven was, and remains today, a Legend in the history of classical music. His influence on music is unequalled. Perhaps no other composer in history wrote music of such exhilarating power. No other composer did so against the trials and hardships that he had went through. He beat the odds to become who he was. A Beethoven was born in Bonn in 1770. His father, a music enthusiast, dreamed of molding his son into the next Mozart. Beethoven never showed the same characteristics that Mozart had shown when he was young, but was unusually talented, learning the piano, organ and violin at an early age. At 14, he was already proficient enough on the organ to receive a profess ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, classical music, teaching methods, frustrated
  • Beethoven - 1,053 words
    Beethoven Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven overcame many obstacles throughout his life (1770-1827). By expanding the style of his influences, he accomplished musical tasks before possible. His influences were Neefe, Mozart, and Bach. In comparison to other composers, such as Bach and Mozart, Beethoven produced a relatively small number of symphonies. However, his nine symphonies contained more emotion and ingenuity than all other artists combined. In fact, the Ninth Symphony Orchestra is Beethovens most renowned work, as well as the greatest accomplishment in music history. Beethoven possessed an enormous musical mind, and proved himself to be the most influential composer of all time. Beethov ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, dysfunctional family, music history, composing
  • Beethoven - 479 words
    Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven was a German composer who is considered to be one of the greatest musicians of all time. He was born in Bonn. Beethovens fathers harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. After his mothers death, at the age of 18, he placed himself at the head of the family, taking responsibility for his two younger brothers, both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna, Austria. In Bonn, Beethovens most important composition teacher was German composer Christian Gottlob Neefe, with whom he studied during the 1780s. Neefe mostly used the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach in his instruction. He later encouraged his stud ...
    Related: beethoven, ludwig van beethoven, amadeus mozart, classical music, humor
  • Beethovens Symphony No 9 - 659 words
    Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 Choral' The 9th Symphony is an amazing piece of music. From the slow opening, to its quick ascent to a powerful clash of instruments, the entire piece is captivating. The incredible part about the entire piece is that from the beginning to the end there is a contrast between soft and loud, always dueling for time. Either there is a strong controlling element running through the music or there is a soft easy melody. The dualism between the deeper instruments playing in contrast to the softer woodwinds makes for an interesting listen. Each time that I have listened to this piece I am always hearing different pieces that I had not heard the ...
    Related: symphony, company publishers, classical music, european history, melodic
  • Bernstein - 511 words
    Bernstein Leonard Bernstein By Amy Lyn Walker Leonard Bernstein was born on August 25, 1918 in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Hes family emigrated to the United States. They were Russian Jews. As a young child, Leonard learned to play the piano and he attended Harvard University. He attended courses and lectures held by Edward Burlingham Hill, Water Piston, and Arthur Tillmann Merritt. He received his diploma in 1939. He studied under Isabella Vengerova, a talented piano player at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, Fritz Reiner, an orchestral conductor, and Randall Thompson for orchestration. Bernstein specialized in orchestral conducting and went to Tanglewood from 1940-1941. He became a pupil ...
    Related: bernstein, leonard bernstein, york city, folk music, music
  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,055 words
    Ch.12 Paul Whiteman(1890-1967)= a classically trained violinist and violist who adored jazz but lacked the gift to emulate the uninhibited improvisations of the jazz musicians he admired, formed a dance band in the early twenties that played jazzy arrangements of popular and even classical melodies. Blues = a black vocal folk music, began as vocal (largely instrumental). Classical blues = based on 3 lines of text. Wild wame dont do the blues. Urban Blues = blues pieces written for publication and professional performance. W.C. Handy = father of the blues. Boggie woogie = arrived from blues (a popular piano style with the form and harmony of the blues, but a faster tempo and a dance beat. Jel ...
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  • Charles Ives - 626 words
    Charles Ives Born in Danbury, Connecticut on October 20, 1874, Charles Ives pursued what is perhaps one of the most extraordinary and paradoxical careers in American music history. Businessman by day and composer by night, Ives's vast output has gradually brought him recognition as the most original and significant American composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Inspired by transcendentalist philosophy, Ives sought a highly personalized musical expression through the most innovative and radical technical means possible. A fascination with bi-tonal forms, polyrhythms, and quotation was nurtured by his father who Ives would later acknowledge as the primary creative influence on hi ...
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  • Clockwork Orange - 681 words
    Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange is one of the most controversial movies ever made. The movie is based around a thug named Alex, a teenager, who finds happiness in about any perverse action. Alex, who seems to find glory in rape, lust, and murder, tells the story from his point of view. The movie examines the usual cliches of "individual freedom". It seems as if Alex suffers from an attempt to exercise his own vitality within a social structure too severe to support it. The film is not only a social satire but also a "fairy tale of retribution" and a "psychological myth",(Kagan) all constructed around the truth of human nature. Each night Alex and his companions commit stylized but meanin ...
    Related: a clockwork orange, clockwork, clockwork orange, orange, individual freedom
  • Composers Of 19th And 20th - 1,024 words
    Composers Of 19th And 20th This essay will consist of information about nine composers and one piece of work that they are known for dating from 1862 to 1990. The names of these composers are: Aaron Copeland, Claude Debussy, Charles Ives, Scott Joplin, Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Leonard Berstein, Igor Stravinsky, and Arnold Schoenberg. The first composer I will discuss will be Aaron Copeland (1900 1990). Mr. Copeland was born in Brooklyn, New York USA to Russian American immigrant parents. His style is strongly tonal with polychords, polyrhythm, changing meters and percussive orchestration. His influences include his teacher Nadia Boulanger, Picasso, Stravinsky and Ernest Hemmingway. So ...
    Related: bessie smith, claude debussy, scott joplin, leonard, bars
  • Confucianism And Its Implications In Modern China - 1,847 words
    Confucianism And It's Implications In Modern China Confucianism is a time enduring philosophy that has stood up to invading clans, war, resentment, enforcement and infringement of new philosophies, and eventually, revival. For almost 80years, up until the late 1970's, Confucianism and its ideas and values have been all but wiped away from China. Though effort was made to remove Confucianism for good from China by the Communist leader Mao Zedong in 1949, the ideas and values were so deeply embedded into peoples mind and the culture that even suppression could not keep it out of the culture and practices. The main factor that has brought Confucianism back into the limelight in China and other ...
    Related: china, confucianism, imperial china, mainland china, modern china, modern society
  • Debussey - 554 words
    Debussey Brandy M. Winn Music 298 Jill Oneal November 6, 2000 Debussy Arabesque, No.1 in E Debussys Arabaesque, has become one of my favorite pieces of classical Music for the simple fact that it is easy for me to identify with. This particular piece of music reminds me a lot of a roller coaster because there are a lot of places where Debussy will build up to a climax then drop dramatically. He is able to do this by manipulating the tempo in which he plays the notes, and the order in which he plays the notes. For example, when he builds up to the climax he plays the notes up tempo and in scale rhythm. When Debussy does this it gives the piece a light hearted feel. Then he uses a chord of not ...
    Related: school work, classical music, tempo, notes
  • Digital Broadcasting - 1,530 words
    Digital Broadcasting Digital Broadcasting Abstract This essay intends to discuss the following statement; Digital Broadcasting will have a fundamental effect on viewing patterns, popular culture and audience identity. This will be done firstly by looking at the history of the BBC and the original intention of Public Service Broadcasting. It will discuss how by John Reiths successful approach to broadcasting, the BBC became a National Institution creating popular culture and a National Identity. It will examine how these first steps and ideas have major role in the introduction of Digital Broadcasting today and whether the initial Reithian values have any meaning in todays society. It will fi ...
    Related: british broadcasting, broadcasting, digital, digital age, adult education
  • Elements Of Music: Sonata - 1,660 words
    Elements Of Music: Sonata The Sonata Christian Corah 10/6/96 In the late 1700's and early 1800's the Baroque period gave way to the classical era, introducing many revolutionary new scientific discoveries and theories. This drastically changed the peoples social views and brought on the age of enlightenment. With this change in social philosophy came changes in musical trends. One of the most important new trends of the time was a more common use of the sonata. During the Classical era, the sonata evolved into a more restricted role, and in doing so, embodied the new style of musical form for the time. The sonata originated in Italy and gradually gained popularity over the rest of Europe. Du ...
    Related: sonata, oxford university, oxford history, first great, embodies
  • Franz Liszt And Kurt Cobain - 414 words
    Franz Liszt and Kurt Cobain Franz Liszt was one of many classical composers. In some ways, he can be compared to a modern rock and roll star. Franz Liszt was born in Raiding, Hungary, on October 22, 1811. Much like Mozart, he was a very great piano player at a very young age. Liszt composed an opera called Don Sancho at the age of fourteen. Professionals of Liszt's time thought that he was only a genius with the piano, which was not enough to give his ideas the great recognition they deserved. Many people thought that Liszt was "a mover and a shaker, a rebel, chased women, and had much talent and personality." He had invented the solo recital. When Liszt had a concert, he usually played his ...
    Related: cobain, franz, franz liszt, kurt, kurt cobain, liszt
  • From Mozart To The Second School Of Vienna - 1,819 words
    From Mozart To The Second School Of Vienna. At Dimitris Mitropoulos hall on the 3rd of February took place a part of the sere From Mozart to the second school of Vienna. Wolfang Amadeus Mozarts piano, violin, viola and violoncello quartet num.2 in E-major, K.493 and Arnold Schoenbergs Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte, Op. 41 for string, piano and voice quartet and after the break, Wolfang Amadeus Mozarts piano, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon quintet in E-major, K-452. The quartets and the quintet were played as written above. Firstly, K.493 which wasAccording to Mozart's own catalogue, the second quartet in E-flat major was completed on June 3, 1786, less than nine months after the letter to Hof ...
    Related: mozart, vienna, make sense, arnold schoenberg, sans
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