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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: city states

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  • A Day In The Life Of An Ancient Athenian - 1,174 words
    A Day in The Life of an Ancient Athenian jenn neff A day in the life of an ancient Athenian Welcome to Athens, the marvel of Greece! The city which is the fountainhead of beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Even as your ship approaches the Athenian harbor Piraeus, you can see the marble monuments of the Acropolis and the shining golden edge of the spear, which belongs to the gigantic statue of the goddess Pallas Athene. This is one of the greatest works of the sculptor Phidias, and symbolizes both the power and justice of the "violet city" as it was called by his contemporaries. Athenian women had virtually no political rights of any kind and were controlled by men at nearly every stage of their l ...
    Related: ancient athens, ancient greeks, athenian, athenian women, family life
  • A Few Greek Gods - 1,919 words
    A Few Greek Gods subject = History 9th grade title = A Few Greek Gods The Ancient Greeks believed in a series of myths which explained nature, set up a moral code for the people, and were just folk lore of the people. In this paper, the beginnings of myths, the Greek gods themselves, and several myths concerning morals, nature, and old lore of the Ancients will be discussed. Because the myths and details about the gods were passed along by word of mouth, some myths or gods might be interchanged or different. The Greek myths started as folk lore until it began to explain nature and storytellers integrated a moral code into the myths. Many myths started out as fairy tales. As new and more effi ...
    Related: greek, greek gods, greek myth, moral code, river styx
  • Alexander The Great - 1,372 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander the Great was a man with no equal in History. He was one of the most important forces known to man. Alexander the Great then crossed the Hellespoint, which is now called the Dardanelles and, as head of a Greek army undertook the war on Persia that his father had been planning. The march he had begun was to be one of the greatest in history. Alexander was one of the biggest influenced on people of all time and one of the most powerful personalities. He really molded people into acting the correct way. He brought people together and showed them how to live better. He defiantly changed the lives of many. Alexander the Great was born in 356 BC Philip his father was ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great alexander, king alexander, asia minor
  • Alexander The Great - 5,120 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander III, more commonly known as Alexander the Great, was one of the greatest military leaders in world history. He was born in Pella, Macedonia, then a Greek nation. The exact date of his birth is uncertain, but was probably either July 20 or 26, 356 B.C. Alexander was considered a child from his birth until 341 B.C. His princehood lasted from 340 to 336 B.C. In 336 B.C. Philip II, his father, was assassinated, thus making Alexander king. Alexander became a military leader in 335, and remained one until his death in 323 B.C. He reigned from 336 B.C. until 323 B.C., when he died. His military campaign in Persia lasted from 334 to 329, and in 328 he began his campaign ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great alexander, king alexander, asia minor
  • Alexander The Great Was One Of The Greatest Emperors And Leaders Of The World In Fact, He Was The Only Emperor To Be Called, - 474 words
    Alexander The Great was one of the greatest emperors and leaders of the world. In fact, he was the only emperor to be called, "The Great." He had studied under a great Greek Philosopher, Aristotle, who taught Alexander literature, science, medicine, philosophy and to speak and write well. Alexander was the son of Philip of Macedonia. Philip became king of Macedonia in 359 B.C., but died in 336 B.C. He left his kingdom to Alexander. Alexander ruled for only thirteen years but he succeeded far beyond what his father had planned. After his father's death in 336 B.C., Alexander became king of Macedonia. He strengthened his claim of king by quickly stopping revolts by Athens, which tried to break ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, emperor, greek philosopher, greek civilization
  • Ancient Civilization - 1,498 words
    Ancient Civilization Describe Paleolithic and Neolithic cultures. What were the main characteristics of each? The Paleolithic Old Stone era began in about 40,000 - 10,000 B. C. The beginning of this period was marked by the first human hunter-gatherer societies. Hunting, fishing, and gathering of fruits and nuts were the main economic endeavors at the time. The responsibilities in these hunter-gathering societies were shared. The men of this period did the very dangerous hunting of large wild animals like bison and reindeer, while women gatherer fruits and nuts for an entire year. The small communities of 25-50 people came to consensus on decisions and ideas were shared. The extended family ...
    Related: civilization, epic of gilgamesh, men and women, religion & politics, irrigation
  • Ancient Greek And Roman Similarities - 513 words
    Ancient Greek and Roman similarities. Ancient Greek and Roman similarities. The ancient Greek and Roman civilizations of Europe began to progress toward a more civilized order of society. As there were no previous establishment to base their ideals on, it was understandable that there were some difficulties in their progression as a society. Although the ancient Greek and Roman governments fell, both had similar paths of creation, conquest, and destruction. Greek society began by the formation of the city-state. "The city-state, based on tribal allegiances, was generally the first political association during the early stages of civilization." ( Perry, 45) This was the first step in the prog ...
    Related: greek, roman, roman society, common sense, city states
  • Ancient Greek Theatre - 817 words
    Ancient Greek Theatre Ancient Greek Theater Imagine this following scene: You are sitting in a dark, fairly crowded large room. There are hundreds of other people, in hundreds of other seats surrounding you. In front of you, there is a large stage, with people acting out a play. Lights, music, and different sound effects set the mood of the play for you to understand more clearly what is going on. With these certain conventions, viewer can get a real grasp of a story in which several actors are trying to portray. However, it hasn't always been this easy to enjoy a play in a theater. Theatre and plays go back as far as "b.c." times. In the Greek theater, the conventions are very different. Un ...
    Related: early greek, greek, greek life, greek theater, greek tragedy, theatre
  • Ancient Maya - 947 words
    Ancient Maya Maya The ancient Maya were a group of American Indian peoples who lived in Southern Mexico. Their descendants, the modern Maya,live in the same regions today. Agriculture was the basis of the economy of the Mayan and corn was the principal food.(Voorhies 324) Other crops included avocados, tomatoes, and chili peppers. They cultivated an enormous variety of plants.(Foley 20) In hieroglyphic writing, astronomy, and mathematics, the Mayan Indians were far ahead of any other people in the New World.(Foley 20) The Mayan invented a solar civil calendar including three hundred sixty- five days.(Ivanoff 86) The accuracy of the Mayan calculations is all the more extraordinary in view of ...
    Related: ancient artifacts, ancient maya, classic maya, maya, musical instruments
  • Antigone - 613 words
    Antigone In Ancient Greece, life was full of complicated questions centered around the expanding field of science. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in the city-states and man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. As a result many new ideals and beliefs surfaced. These new ideals and beliefs, though good in intentions, often conflicted with one another and created complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Sophocles play Antigone that was written in this era. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war concerning their ideals. They both base there actions on what they believe is right and wrong. The conflict arose when their ideals that bac ...
    Related: antigone, political power, freedom of religion, family life, conquer
  • Antigone - 890 words
    Antigone In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to lifes complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered on the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with the controversy of the Greek idea ...
    Related: antigone, freedom of religion, city states, ancient greece, haemon
  • Antigone Analysis Of Greek Ideals - 894 words
    Antigone - Analysis of Greek Ideals In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life's complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with t ...
    Related: antigone, greek, political power, ancient greece, expanding
  • Antigone Analysis Of Greek Ideals - 894 words
    Antigone - Analysis of Greek Ideals In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life's complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with t ...
    Related: antigone, greek, city state, political power, ceremony
  • Antigone Analysis Of Greek Ideals - 894 words
    Antigone - Analysis of Greek Ideals In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life's complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with t ...
    Related: antigone, greek, family life, city states, conquer
  • Antigone Analysis Of Greek Ideals - 894 words
    Antigone - Analysis of Greek Ideals In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life's complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral dilemmas. Such was the case in Antigone a play written by Sophocles during this era of change. In the play, Antigone and Creon battle a philosophical war dealing with t ...
    Related: antigone, greek, ancient greece, city states, creon
  • Aristotle B 384 D 322 Bc, Was A Greek Philosopher, Logician, - 1,556 words
    Aristotle (b. 384 - d. 322 BC), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Aristotle was born in Stagira in northern Greece, and his father was a court physician to the king of Macedon. As a young man he studied in Plato's Academy in Athens. After Plato's death he left Athens to conduct philosophical and biological research in Asia Minor and Lesbos, and he was then invited by King Philip II of Macedon to tutor his young son, Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander succeeded his father, consolidated the conquest ...
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  • Aristotles Political Ideal - 1,169 words
    Aristotle's Political Ideal Aristotle's Political Ideal "It is not Fortune's power to make a city good; that is a matter of scientific planning and deliberative policy." Aristotle, along with most of the prominent thinkers of his time, theorized upon what the Ideal Political State would be and through what means it could be obtained. Aristotle wrote on this discussion of the Ideal State in books VII and VIII of The Politics. What Aristotle observed around him were the prevalent city-states of ancient Greece. It is commonly believed that he did not have a vision of the large nation-state and especially not such great federations as the United States and Russia. What Aristotle referred to when ...
    Related: ideal state, ancient greece, city states, natural resources, render
  • Art As A Reflection Of Anciant Civilization - 1,373 words
    Art As A Reflection Of Anciant Civilization Art as Reflection of Anciant Civilization Ancient Egytian and Greek sociaties both made significant contributions to western civilization, specificaly in the areas of politics and social structure. The political system of antient Egypt was primarily based on the religios belife that the Pharoah was a divine entity, while Greek politics were based in a democratic system that valued individuals in a unique way. The poitical and social advancments of both Greek and Egyption civilizations are best reflected in the advancement of each cultures artwork. In the early kingdom of the Egyption civilization the Pharoah rulled as a God-King and dictated the re ...
    Related: civilization, egyptian civilization, greek civilization, reflection, western civilization
  • Athens And Sparta - 855 words
    Athens and Sparta Athens and Sparta The country of Greece in 400-500 B.C. was led to greatness by two great city-states. These city-states were Athens and Sparta. These two states were as different as night and day. They were rivals and very diverse. As you read you will find out their differences between their form of culture and government. The city-state of Athens adopted a form of government which is now called democracy. Democracy is when the government is ruled by the people. This government consisted of an assembly , a jury , and there was a council of 500 men over 30 . The council decided such matters as to declare war or to spend money. The council was used to make decisions for the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athens, sparta, the iliad, physical education
  • Athens And Sparta The Culture - 1,029 words
    Athens And Sparta; The Culture Athens Athens was one of the first city-states. Each of these independent states consisted of a city and the region that surrounded it. Athens had a king, as did other Greek states. According to tradition, the first king of Athens was named Cecrops. Kings ruled the city-state until 682 B.C. Beginning that year, elected officials called archons headed the government of Athens. The general assembly, which consisted of all adult male citizens of Athens, elected the archons to one-year terms. After their term of office, the archons joined the Areopagus, a council of elder statesmen. The Areopagus judged murder trials and prepared political matters for the vote of t ...
    Related: athens, sparta, city states, greek state, eastern
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