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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: church music

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  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
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  • April Robinson - 1,218 words
    April Robinson Dr. Robbins Exposition & Report Writing 620:015 21 February 2000 Bach: Life and Music He was a musical genius with thousands of musical compositions written in his lifetime. He spent his life in Germany, primarily Leipzig, and worked at a school for the city. He is considered to be one of the greatest musical composers, and composed till the day he died. An unruly youth who greatly disliked authority, he had a strong will and mind of his own. Well liked with many friends, yet no one really knew his inner workings, or how he thought. Of the thousands of musical pieces he composed, few were published in his life. This was a man who composed in great numbers, had reasons for doin ...
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  • Bach, John Sebastian - 671 words
    Bach, John Sebastian Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Johann Sebastian Bach is probally one of the greatest composers of his time, as well as our time. As a boy he had a fantastic soprano singing voice and always took the lead roles in the church and school choirs. He started composing fairly early on in his life and his first main works, including the Preludes and Variations for the organ, were composed between the ages of 17 and 20. Bach loved church music and was regarded as one of the finest organists of his day. Since he was raised up with strong ties to the church, he was always involved in church music both as a singer and an organist. He wrote many of his marvelous series of cantata ...
    Related: johann sebastian bach, sebastian, sebastian bach, chamber music, church music
  • Blues Music - 1,275 words
    Blues Music Arts: A Brief History of the Blues 2000-06-30 A Brief History of the Blues Joseph Machlis says that the blues is a native American musical and verse form, with no direct European and African antecedents of which we know. (p. 578) In other words, it is a blending of both traditions. Something special and entirely different from either of its parent traditions. (Although Alan Lomax cites some examples of very similar songs having been found in Northwest Africa, particularly among the Wolof and Watusi. p. 233) The word 'blue' has been associated with the idea of melancholia or depression since the Elizabethan era. The American writer, Washington Irving is credited with coining the t ...
    Related: african music, blues, blues music, church music, music, pop music
  • By The Sword And The Cross, Charlemagne Became Master Of Western Europe It Was Falling Into Decay When Charlemagne Became Joi - 1,161 words
    By the sword and the cross, Charlemagne became master of Western Europe. It was falling into decay when Charlemagne became joint king of the Franks in 768. Except in the monasteries, people had all but forgotten education and the arts. Boldly Charlemagne conquered barbarians and kings alike. By restoring the roots of learning and order, he preserved many political rights and revived culture. Charlemagne's grandfather was Charles Martel, the warrior who crushed the Saracens. Charlemagne was the elder son of Bertrade and Pepin the Short, first mayor of the palace to become king of the Franks. Although schools had almost disappeared in the 8th century, historians believe that Bertrade gave youn ...
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  • Hemmingway - 1,847 words
    Hemmingway The central theme in Hemingway's work is heroism. Most of his novels are not primarily studies of death or simply researches into the lost generation. They are essentially the portrayal of a hero, the man who by force of some extraordinary quality sets the standards for those around him. Hemingway has always kept four subjects in his mind when writing. These four subjects which have always fascinated Hemingway are fishing, hunting, bullfighting, and war, in which all have shown some type of international aspects. But most of Hemingway's novels are the studies death. They are a portrayal of a hero, but also a heroes struggle and perception of death. What truly influences Hemingway' ...
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  • Martin Luther - 1,291 words
    Martin Luther Martin Luther was a German theologian and religious reformer that had a great impact on not only religion but also on politics, economics, education and language. Martin Luther was born in the town of Eisleben, Germany, on November 10, 1483, (Encarta 1). His father Hans Luther, was a worker in the copper mines in Mansfield. His mother was Margaret. Martin grew up in a home where parents prayed faithfully to the saints and taught their children to do the same. His father and mother loved their children dearly, but were also very strict with them. Luther said, my father once whipped me so that I ran away and felt ugly toward him until he was at pains to win me back. My mother onc ...
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  • Motet Music - 1,791 words
    Motet Music The genesis of the motet is, like the biblical birth of Eve, a matter of appendage. In the case of Eve, a rib was removed from Adam and fashioned into a women; the motet was a rib added to pre-existing clausulae. James C. Thomson describes this development as follows: In the thirteenth century, perhaps sooner, it became the practice to add a new text to the upper voice of a clausula. The newly worded, was then called motetus. (Thomson, 56) Despite its somewhat haphazard birth, the form was widely accepted. Grout describes its popularity as: Thousands of motets were written in the thirteenth century; the style spread from Paris throughout France and to all parts of western Europe. ...
    Related: century music, church music, music, music history, music styles, renaissance music
  • Mozart - 1,037 words
    Mozart Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Outline Click to view outline and jump to a section. I. Introduction II. Mozart's Musically Precocious Childhood III. A Difficult Later Life IV. Evaluation I. Introduction Print section Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus (1756-91), Austrian composer, a centrally important composer of the classical era, and one of the most inspired composers in Western musical tradition. Born January 27, 1756, in Salzburg, and baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart, he was educated by his father, Leopold Mozart, who was concertmaster in the court orchestra of the archbishop of Salzburg and a celebrated violinist, composer, and author. II. Mozart's Musically Precociou ...
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  • Mozart - 653 words
    Mozart I'm writing my paper on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. I will be talking about his life and his music. I will tell you a little bit about his father, wife, and son. Mozart was the leading composer of the Classical Age. He wrote many different types of music. He was the best composer of his time. Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria on January 27, 1756. He was around music his entire life. By the age of three, he had begun to show a love of music. He would listen to his sister play the piano for hours at a time. Then he would get up on the bench and try it himself. He loved to watch and learn from his sister. When Mozart was five, he was already doing plays. He took part in a comedy called S ...
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  • Music, Feelings And Arts - 3,003 words
    Music, Feelings And Arts Music is sound arranged into pleasing or interesting patterns. It forms an important part of many cultural and social activities. People use music to express feelings and ideas. Music also serves to entertain and relax. Like drama and dance, music is a performing art. It differs from such arts as painting and poetry, in which artists create works and then display or publish them. Musical composers need musicians to interpret and perform their works, just as playwrights need actors to perform their plays. Thus, musical performances are partnerships between composers and performers. Music also plays a major role in other arts. Opera combines singing and orchestral musi ...
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  • Palestrina - 1,562 words
    Palestrina Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina The greatest composer of liturgical music of all time, born at Palestrina (ancient Praeneste) in 1514 or 1515, according to Baini, Riemann, and others, according to Haberl, in 1526; died at Rome, 2 February, 1594. His early history is practically unknown. Giusseppi Ottavia Pittoni (1657-1743), in notizie dei maestri di cappella si di Rome che altramontani, 1600-1700, a manuscript in the Vatican, relates that young Pierluigi sang in the streets of Rome while offering for sale the products of his parents farm and that he was heard on such an occasion by the choirmaster of Santa Maria Maggiore, who, impressed by the boy's beautiful voice and pronounce ...
    Related: palestrina, counter reformation, church music, virgin mary, significance
  • Renaissance Music - 1,306 words
    Renaissance Music The Renaissance was a period by which modern scholars consider as that between 1350 1600. Abundant in this new age was inventions and individualistic beliefs. Changes in music and cultural behavior were some of the most evident development from its predecessor of the Middle ages. Period of new inventions, belief, musical styles of freedom, and individuality. It was a period of exploration and adventure from 1492-1519, which saw the likes of Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, and Ferdinand Magellan. This was a drastic difference from the Middle Ages where the church held most of the power. The power was slowly transferring to the artist, musician, and people of high societ ...
    Related: church music, medieval music, music, music lovers, renaissance, renaissance music, sacred music
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