Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: abnormal

  • 307 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,197 words
    Abnormal Psychology In a world full of fears, perhaps the worst one a human being should haveis that to be afraid of his fellow man. The human that should be mostfeared is the one that has Anti-Social Personality Disorder or in laymensterms the psychopath. The psychopath is probably the most deviant mindthat exists and treatment is not very successful because there is not a cureor drug to control it. The solution in my mind to control the problem ofsociopaths is to let them live in colonies with each other. Through myresearch I will develop an understanding of this personality disorder andconvince you the reader that my solution might be a viable solution. Thesociopath is a combination of ot ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, hyperactivity disorder, violent behavior
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,142 words
    ... buting cause or consequence of beingantisocial. People that are both antisocial and alcoholic are prone toviolent behavior. Not every antisocial becomes a criminal. An antisocialpersons disorder peaks between the ages of 24 and 44 and drops offsharply after that. After the age of 30 the sociopath fights less andperforms less crime but the illness can persist into the ages of between 60and 70 but after 30 are less likely to be in trouble with the law. In asociopaths in their thirties will continue to have problems such as unstablerelationships, substance abuse, impulsiveness, poor temper control andfailure to honor financial obligations. In our population 3% men haveAnti-Social Personalit ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, antisocial personality disorder, anti-social personality disorder
  • Abnormal Psychology Problem: Excessive Use Of Marijuana And Alcohol - 717 words
    Abnormal Psychology Problem: Excessive Use Of Marijuana And Alcohol Case Study Abnormal Psychology Problem Excessive use of marijuana and alcohol, especially within the last 2 years. Kurt began drinking and using marijuana at age 14 and by age 15 referred to the usage as heavy. Despite recently being caught for the theft of his parents TYME card and $400, which resulted in him being forced to join an AODA group, he still continues to use on a regular basis. He has also gone to work while intoxicated and attended a school dance under the influence of marijuana. As a result he was fired from his job and had to undergo a urine screen in order to again be allowed back into his particular school. ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, alcohol, excessive, marijuana, psychology
  • Normal Abnormal Individuals - 1,227 words
    Normal & Abnormal Individuals During the course of the last fifty years, society has changed significantly. In modern society a great emphasis is placed on individualism and diversity within a society. It is rare that an individual would be ridiculed or forced to change simply for not complying with what society views as normal. This has not always been the case though. The nineteen fifties were much different. This was an era of social conformity. The members of society who were intent on maintaining this social state ostracized individuals who were considered abnormal. Such abnormal individuals just simply accepted the fact that they were not part of this normal society. Because of society ...
    Related: abnormal, one flew over the cuckoo's nest, self reliance, social norms, lets
  • 1984 - 1,273 words
    1984 Jean-Marie Lauria Professor Rednour Western Enlightenment April 20, 2001 Tyrants, Communism, Big Brother, Stalin, and 1984 In George Orwells, 1984, no individual freedoms are present. It mirrors mid twentieth century Europe during World War II and its affects. Winston the main character who is a 39-year-old man, was neither remarkable in intelligence nor character, but is disgusted with the world he lives in. He works in the Ministry of Truth, where history and the truth are rewritten to fit the party's beliefs. This is an example of the use of propaganda to fit the need of the government during World War Two. Winston is aware of the falsehoods, because it is his job to make them true. ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, third stage, century europe, smith
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • A Cry In The Night - 1,343 words
    A Cry in the Night Setting: The story starts in New York City, most likely present day. Then as the story goes on it moves to minnesota out to Erich's farm. It is winter in Minnesota and very cold. Characters: Jenny is the main character of the story. She is a divorced mother of two. She is young and pretty. She works at an art museum in New York City to support herself and her two little girls. She is kind and sweet and has a brilliant sense of humor. Erich is an artist. He's mysterious and curious. His actions speak louder then most words because he tends to be quiet during the story. On the outside he seems like the most perfect man. The type that every woman hopes of meeting and falling ...
    Related: best friend, york city, main character, mark, coffee
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • Abigail - 724 words
    Abigail Abigail and the girls deny everything. Part od their denial is accusation. By shifting the blame onto someone else, they believe that they will not be held accountable for their own sins. Abigail manipulates her way through the play, and even after Mary Warren confessed that the whole story was a pretense, Abigail continues manipulating the court room and the people within it with antics of 'a wind, a cold wind' and 'Oh Heavenly Father, take away this shadow'. In the end she is adamant to convince the court that they were only involved with witchcraft because of Mary Warren, hoping profusely to save her own name. Denial in Salem is considered a terrible sin. The narrow mindedness of ...
    Related: abigail, court room, john proctor, thomas putnam, putnam
  • Abortion: Prochoice Or Prolife - 1,451 words
    Abortion: Pro-Choice Or Pro-Life Daniels 1 Kimberly Daniels Ms. Clara Wright English IV 21 January 2000 Abortion: Pro-Choice or Pro-Life Controlling Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the pro-choice and pro-life controversy of receiving an abortion. I. Introduction A. Definition of abortion. II. Thesis statement A. Pro-choice B. Pro-Life III. The views A. The moral viewpoint B. The murder viewpoint C. The restriction viewpoint D. The parental consent viewpoint E. The rape justification viewpoint F. The safe viewpoint IV. Conclusion A. First Amendment Daniels 2 Abortion: Pro-Choice or Pro-Life " But oh, thrice guilty is he who drove her to desperation which impelled her to the c ...
    Related: social issues, the bible, united states supreme, anthony, advocate
  • Abstract - 744 words
    Abstract Animal experimentation has been going on for a while now and people have been protesting against it since it has begun. It seems now days there are more cons for animal experiments because of how it has become a popular topic to this day. The pros seem to think that animal experiments are necessary for living a healthy life. With all of the debating going on, animal experimentation may be halted. Animal Experimentation Should animal experimentation be regulated? Do animals have the same rights we do? These are questions that are of much debate. Animals are used in experiments all of the time, whether they are testing a new drug, or testing their reactions to a new fabric softener. B ...
    Related: abstract, human ethics, human responsibility, animal testing, peta
  • Accidents - 1,643 words
    ... ike metallurgy, forensics, etc. 5. Obtain all other non-privileged materials gathered by the SIB. 6. Obtain a list of the SIB witnesses. Once all the data and evidence has been collected the advisors are brought in to review all the information and make judgments and evaluations, not to mention aid in the writing of the report. A maintenance advisor reviews maintenance records, documentation, personnel and supervision. A Medical advisor should review: 1. Medical qualifications 2. Postmortem and toxicology reports. Which by the way are obtained from the SIB flight surgeon. 3. Post-accident medical examination records of survivors. 4. And last but not least autopsy protocols and medical re ...
    Related: life support, the intended, total cost, partial, mention
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,655 words
    ... er to determine the legislative intent behind this statute. There is no concrete history for the present code but the court relied on commentary from the tentative draft of the Alaska Criminal Code revision. The commentary states, "Subsection (2) codifies the current case law that one is liable as a traditional 'accomplice' if he acts 'with intent to promote or facilitate the commission of the offense'." Alaska Criminal Code Revision Part II, at 31 (Tent. Draft 1977) (citations omitted) quoted in 818 P.2d 691, 692. This comment is persuasive because prior to the revision every time the Supreme Court of Alaska defined the mens rea requirement for an accomplice it stated that one has to ha ...
    Related: criminal law, criminal case, drunk driving, alaskan, requirement
  • Addadhd - 1,128 words
    ADD/ADHD Factual Data Attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) refers to a group of symptoms that begin in infancy and can continue into adulthood, causing difficulties for people at home, at school, at their jobs, and within their communities. The severity of symptoms varies among people with ADHD. Some people have difficulty with overactivity (hyperactivity), while others have difficulty remembering, thinking, making judgments, and solving problems. The most common symptom of ADHD is difficulty remaining focused on a task until it is completed. People with ADHD have a hard time completing tasks that are boring, repetitive, or difficult for them. Many people with ADHD have trouble cont ...
    Related: deficit hyperactive disorder, social behavior, personal relationships, relationships, norepinephrine
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,200 words
    Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice Abstract Understand, interpret, direct. This statement is an oversimplification of sorts, but defines the essence of Adlerian psychotherapy. From this minimal overview of Adlerian theory, we can begin to elaborate and explore the intricacies of individual psychology. Adlerians are concerned with understanding the unique and private beliefs and strategies of the individual (private logic and mistaken notions) that we create in childhood, and which serve as a reference for attitudes, private views of self, others and the world, and behavior (lifestyle). Therapeutic work with clients involves short-term and intensive work to increase so ...
    Related: overview, personal growth, self concept, holistic approach, perfection
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Aging Theories - 1,709 words
    Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affec ...
    Related: aging, aging process, cell division, free radicals, gradual
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • 307 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>