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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: christian faith

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  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find By Flannery Oconnor - 1,311 words
    "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" by Flannery O'Connor "A Good Man Is Hard To Find," by Flannery O'Connor, presents many topics that can be discussed and debated. Christianity is one of the main topics that influence this paper and its meaning. The exploration for the meaning of the Christian faith is continuous throughout O'Connor's paper. Christianity is filled with sin and punishment, good and evil, belief and unbelief, but grandmother fully tells her opinion as she tries to convince "The Misfit" that he is a good Christian man before he kills her. Foreshadowing, personification, and the meaning of religion are all main points effecting the reader as they interpret this story. Foreshadowing is ...
    Related: flannery, flannery o'connor, good and evil, good man is hard to find, oconnor
  • A History Of Christianity In Egypt - 1,119 words
    A History of Christianity in Egypt A History of Christianity in Egypt The history of Christianity in Egypt dates back verily to the beginnings of Christianity itself. Many Christians hold that Christianity was brought to Egypt by the Apostle Saint Mark in the early part of the first century AD. Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, in his Ecclesiastic History states that Saint Mark first came to Egypt between the first and third year of the reign of Emperor Claudius, which would make it sometime between AD 41 and 44, and that he returned to Alexandria some twenty years later to preach and evangelize. Saint Mark's first convert in Alexandria was Anianus, a shoemaker who later was consecrated a bishop ...
    Related: christianity, egypt, history, upper egypt, emperor constantine
  • African Americans In The South - 1,211 words
    African Americans In The South As a social and economic institution, slavery originated in the times when humans began farming instead of hunting and gathering. Slave labor became commonplace in ancient Greece and Rome. Slaves were created through the capture of enemies, the birth of children to slave parents, and means of punishment. Enslaved Africans represented many different peoples, each with distinct cultures, religions, and languages. Most originated from the coast or the interior of West Africa, between present-day Senegal and Angola. Other enslaved peoples originally came from Madagascar and Tanzania in East Africa. Slavery became of major economic importance after the sixteenth cen ...
    Related: african, african american, american civil, american civil war, american independence, american population, south carolina
  • Afterlife - 1,065 words
    ... ny persons of the anti-Christ religion strongly believe in annihilationism. The living attitude is usually harbored with a lack of conscience and desire for good. It is not considered an "afterlife", but is a strong and constant argument against eternal life. B.B. Warfield claimed that there were three different forms of annihilationism. "Pure Mortalism" holds that the human life is so closely tied to the physical organism that when the body dies, the person as an entity ceases to exist (Erickson, 1237). Due to its pantheistic views, this doctrine hasn't received much attention. The second is "Conditional Immortality", man is a mortal being. Unless God gives you immortality, death is the ...
    Related: afterlife, jesus christ, different forms, ancient religion, dialogue
  • America Pathway Tto The Present Chp - 1,143 words
    America Pathway Tto The Present Chp2-3 1. (A) Reformation- a new complication arose in the early 1500s, when a powerful religious movement, the Reformation, brought bitter divisions to Europe. During the Reformation, a new Christian faith, called Protestantism, developed in protest against what was seen as the corruption and inadequery of Catholic Church. Because the English were Protestant and the Irish were Catholic, the Reformation also heightened the conflict between the English and the Irish. (B) Joint Stock Company-They called the new village Jamestown in honor of their king, James I. The land itself they called Virginia, after their last ruler, Elizabeth, who had never married and bor ...
    Related: america, pathway, chesapeake bay, virginia company, servant
  • Antisemitism Influence - 2,144 words
    Anti-Semitism Influence The word rests in a conversation like a foul stench and with it comes unbidden images and accusations. Today in many circles this word alone is possibly the most horrendous name to place on a person. Maybe though, not because of what it means, but because of what it brings to mind. Automatically and unwanted, pictures come to our mind of goose stepping Nazis and concentration camps, bodies piled high and what we think of as the air fills with the scent of burning flesh. Our worst nightmares and human kinds worst behaviors. Yet, many of us do not know where the term came from or even what it means beyond their simple ideas. Even dictionaries only give the blandest desc ...
    Related: antisemitism, body politic, ku klux klan, christian faith, luther
  • Apologetics - 436 words
    Apologetics A couple of months ago, being pretty ignorant, I had to ask myself, what exactly is Apologetics. After a little research and a few lectures from my Professors, I learned that it is the defense of Christian faith, usually on intellectual issues. (Horton 640). There are many arguments that can be used in order to defend the faith, however, I will focus on four arguments, ontological, Natural Theology, accuracy of scriptures, and personal miracles. First is the ontological argument. Human beings almost universally acknowledge that there is something, or someone, beyond themselves and that in some way, or ways, they are responsible to that something or someone (Railey/Aker 40). This ...
    Related: apologetics, divine intervention, the bible, christian faith, blood
  • Array Of Light - 1,076 words
    Array Of Light At first glance, Beowulf appears to be an epic exclusively about Christian values, and how it influenced the Anglo-Saxons of this time. Moreover, a tale about how Christian principles always defeat the forces of evil, and how all thanes and kings are saintly. However, as the book further develops, it becomes more apparent that this epic intertwines the ideals of both paganism and Christianity. Although the Beowulf poet makes many Christian references in the book through his extensive knowledge of the Bible, the main points he uses to explain the Anglo-Saxon society is through the principles of pagan religion. Such abundant references to material rewards, earthly fame, wyrd, an ...
    Related: array, everyday lives, christian faith, grendel's mother, epic
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Book Of Galations - 1,086 words
    Book Of Galations The role of women in the Christian faith has always been matter of debate. Whether women are equal to men in the eyes of the church still presents itself as a major question as we move into the 21st century. Women are still not allowed to serve as priests or hold major positions in the churchs hierarchy. This inferiority is something that is seen as tradition and rarely do people question it. However, in Pauls letters he alluded to a different role that women should take on. He presents the idea that everyone is equal in the eyes of the Lord as long as they have been baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Although he was not the first to ever express these beliefs, the idea ...
    Related: book of genesis, christian faith, male female, century women, formula
  • Book Of Galations - 1,070 words
    ... , since it could be viewed that Paul was challenging creation beliefs, internal criticisms most likely also existed. It could have been for these reasons that Paul rethought what he expressed in his writings after Galatians. On a more specific level a certain situation in Corinth could have given rise to Paul reevaluating his stance on the role of women. In Corinth there were some women who were not upholding traditions and instead were wearing their hair unbound. At the time a woman who wore her hair unbound was often seen as type of cult member. Paul most likely understood the dire effects that this could have on the early church. If other people saw this unbound hair that was often co ...
    Related: jesus christ, christian writings, different aspects, prophetic, woman
  • Borrowed Ethics - 2,999 words
    ... God. Biblical response: Agree SA Public Schools 35.3%, Christian Schools 67.4% TA Public Schools 29.8%, Christian Schools 15.4% Total Public Schools 65.1%, Christian Schools 82.8%, Difference 17.7% Q89 Federal and state governments should provide price support programs to industries providing essential services (e.g.: agriculture, housing, and medical care). Biblical response: Disagree SD Public Schools 5.1%, Christian Schools 35.3% TD Public Schools 25.2%, Christian Schools 23.5% Total Public Schools 30.3%, Christian Schools 58.8%, Difference 28.5% Q96 A primary function of civil government is to enact educational and social programs designed to prevent over-population of its land. Bib ...
    Related: borrowed, ethics, sunday school, human nature, comprehensive
  • Buddhism Details - 905 words
    Buddhism Details The most devoted followers of the Buddha were organized into a sangha. Its members were identified by their shaved heads and robes made of un-sewn orange cloth. The early Buddhist monks, or bhikkus, wandered from place to place, settling down in communities only during the rainy season when travel was difficult. Theravadan monks and nuns were humble and obtained their food in the form of offering on a daily round of the homes of Lay devotees. Among the traditional functions of the Buddhist monks are the performance of funerals and memorial services in honor of the dead. Major elements of such services include the chanting of scripture and transfer of merit for the benefit of ...
    Related: buddhism, holy spirit, ten commandments, the bible, conscience
  • C S Lewis - 994 words
    C. S. Lewis C. S. Lewis, a well-known author and apologist, is best known by people of all ages for his seven volume series entitled The Chronicles of Narnia. As Lewis wrote about the land of Narnia, an imaginary world visited by children of this world, he had two obvious purposes: to entertain the readers and to suggest analogies of the Christian faith. Although some feel that his stories are violent, Lewis is successful at using fiction to open peoples hearts to accepting Christ as their Savior because he first entertains the audience with a wonderful story. Lewis talked about how he came to write the books of Narnia, saying that they "all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrell ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, lewis, literary critic, new jersey, cornell
  • Calvin And Theocracy Teaching - 1,063 words
    ... ted certain formulas of equity and justice, by which they might live together blamelessly and peaceably." These three characteristics of law lack the fortitude found in similar systems of theocracy. In Catholicism, without The Church as the foundation of government, legal systems, however prudent, loose their credibility to individual wants and desires. Calvin conversely maintains that only the Catholic church possesses the attributes to corrupt an otherwise sensible, threefold legal structure. Continuing with his thesis on law, Calvin focuses on the believers proper use of the established legal system. He does not specifically forbid Christians to engage in legal disputes. Calvin does, ...
    Related: calvin, john calvin, theocracy, legal system, anchor books
  • Calvins Unique Theocracy - 1,063 words
    ... ed certain formulas of equity and justice, by which they might live together blamelessly and peaceably." These three characteristics of law lack the fortitude found in similar systems of theocracy. In Catholicism, without The Church as the foundation of government, legal systems, however prudent, loose their credibility to individual wants and desires. Calvin conversely maintains that only the Catholic church possesses the attributes to corrupt an otherwise sensible, threefold legal structure. Continuing with his thesis on law, Calvin focuses on the believers proper use of the established legal system. He does not specifically forbid Christians to engage in legal disputes. Calvin does, h ...
    Related: john calvin, theocracy, christian faith, chosen people, seized
  • Catherine The Great - 1,166 words
    ... inst Turkey. Nevertheless, the drafts written by the electives were not wasted, as the materials were employed in a "Description of the Russian Empire and its International Administration and Legal Enactments," published in 1783. This proclamation was the closest thing that Russia had to a law code for the next 50 years (Hosking 100). It denounced capital punishment and torture, it argued for crime prevention and, in general, "was abreast of advanced Western thought for criminology" (Riasanovsky 259). Catherine decided that, before positing common interests, which did not exist, she should put more backbone into fragmented Russia by creating institutions which would enable citizens to wo ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, russian empire, everyday life, contribution
  • Charlemagne - 4,290 words
    ... y The Merovingian family, from which the Franks used to choose their kings, is commonly said to have lasted until the time of Childeric [III, 743-752] who was deposed, shaved, and thrust into the cloister by command of the Roman Pontiff Stephen [II (or III) 752-757]. But although, to all outward appearance, it ended with him, it had long since been devoid of vital strength, and conspicuous only from bearing the empty epithet Royal; the real power and authority in the kingdom lay in the hands of the chief officer of the court, the so-called Mayor of the Palace, and he was at the head of affairs. There was nothing left the King to do but to be content with his name of King, his flowing hai ...
    Related: charlemagne, king charles, roman church, faith and religion, brook
  • Christian - 1,749 words
    Christian Persecutions Kyle Sokul 453516 History 114, Dr. Kalinowsk Christian Persecutions Christianity first comes to the forefront of society in the first three centuries A.D. It does this though under extreme duress, as any person who claimed to be a Christian faced persecution at the hands of the Roman emperors. It wasnt until 313 AD, under the Emperor Constantine, that Christianity was officially recognized as an acceptable religion. Yet, despite the unfavorable conditions, the Christian faith survived and eventually came to play a prominent role in Roman society. This can be directly attributed to the courage showed by the martyrs of this age, and the pride that the rest of the Christi ...
    Related: christian, christian faith, christian writings, emperor constantine, oxford university press
  • Christian Antisemitism - 1,287 words
    ... hern France; he wrote that Jews are "more perfidious and faithless than demons." (20) Persecution of Jews continued right into the Reformation and became more vicious. Identification of Jews with Satan became increasingly explicit. Erasmus (1466-1536), the Dutch philosopher and theologian, wrote, "If it is the part of a good Christian to detest the Jews, then we are all good Christians." (21) Lest one should place all this anti-Semitism at the door of the Catholic Church, no less a Protestant hero than Martin Luther denounced Jews as children of the devil. In 1542 Luther published Against the Jews and Their Lies, a 200-page rant which includes the following: Know, O adored Christ, and ma ...
    Related: antisemitism, christian, christian faith, chicago press, black people
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