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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: chinese society

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  • Chinese Society - 1,573 words
    Chinese Society China Paper CHINESE SOCIETY Even since the dramatic post-1949 changes in China regarding the role of women, China has remained paternalistic in it's attitudes and social reality. The land reform, which was intended to create a more balanced economic force in marriage, was the beginning of governmental efforts to pacify women, with no real social effect. Communist China needed to address the woman question. Since women wanted more equality, and equality is doled out from the hands of those in power,capitalism was examined. The economic issues of repressed Chinese women were focused on the Land Act and the Marriage Act of 1950. The Land reform succeeded in eliminating the exten ...
    Related: chinese, chinese society, chinese women, family member, birth control
  • Ancestor Worship - 1,174 words
    Ancestor Worship 4. Compare and contrast Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. How are they similar? How are they different? 5. Describe the Chinese tradition of ancestor worship. -Question 4. Buddhism Has over 300 million members, and was founded around 2, 500 years ago in India. The founder is Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, or referred to as the Enlightened One. Their major scripture are The Triptaka, Anguttara-Nikaya, Dhammapada, Sutta-Nipata, Samyutta-Nikaya and many others. Buddhism today is divided into three main sects: Theravada, or Hinayana (Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia), Mahayana (China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea), and Vajrayana (Tibet, Mongolia and Japan). Their Life goal is Ni ...
    Related: ancestor worship, worship, everyday life, famous people, hunting
  • Celebrated Cases Of Judge Dee - 629 words
    Celebrated Cases Of Judge Dee Sung Yon Kim Asian Civilization Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee In by reading the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, I gained a perspective of the people and culture of China. This book showed the analysis of Chinese saw and the background of Chinese history. Judge Dee, during the Tang Dynasty, was a well-known statesman and a magistrate to a town called Chang-Ping. He was known to be a famous detective, in which he could solve all crimes. In the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, he is faced with three murders, which develop throughout the book. First of the three murders was the murder of the two silk merchants. Second was the sudden death of a young husband, and thirdl ...
    Related: forensic science, book reports, compare and contrast, luck, clever
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Chinese Art During The Early Empire - 1,787 words
    Chinese Art During The Early Empire In this essay, I will look at the outpouring of thought, art and literature during the early empire. More so though, I will focus on what factors led to this renewed focus on culture in the early empire. It would seem that there were several factor which would lead to this renewed interest in culture in early China, but the most significant of these factors would be the re-establishment of a strong central government. This re-establishment of a strong central government laid the foundation for cultural growth. It brought with it prosperity to China, through improved infrastructure, such as the canals and graineries. As a result of these improvements, China ...
    Related: chinese, chinese art, chinese culture, chinese history, chinese people, chinese society, chinese tradition
  • Chinese Women - 1,217 words
    Chinese Women China, located in East Asia, is the third largest country by area and the largest country by population in the world. While China has one-fifth of the world's total population, and it also has one of the earliest civilizations, dating back to some 5000 years ago. China is often distinguished for its technological advances and intelligence, but in the early 20th century, Chinese society was far from perfect. The women in China, lived a slow and difficult life, bound by tradition and obedience. Women had to bind their feet at birth or face adversity throughout their entire lives. Footbinding was a painful process that allowed women to be thought of as beautiful and a good future ...
    Related: chinese, chinese culture, chinese society, chinese women, women in china
  • Chinese Women - 1,153 words
    ... ot walk, but rather they limped with excruciating pain, leaning on walls or on other people for support and balance. The feet became so bad that women could not physically move freely or without another person and consequently they could do anything really meaningful with their lives.27 In wealthy families, servants took care of personal needs and carried the women when the feet were too weak for walking. Beside from the daily torture and soreness, problems like ulceration, paralysis, and gangrene developed. In extreme cases, about ten percent of Chinese girls died in the initial process of footbinding.28 The rise of communism in China challenged traditional beliefs about the role of wom ...
    Related: chinese, chinese communist, chinese communist party, chinese culture, chinese government, chinese society, chinese women
  • Confucius - 1,197 words
    ... i, that the people would correct their behavior by their own initiative. In the Analects, Confucius said, Lead the people with legal measures and regulate them by punishment, and they will avoid wrongdoing but will have no sense of honor and shame. Lead them with the power of virtuous example and regulate them by the rules of li, and they will have a sense of shame and will thus rectify themselves. (Analects 2.3) Confucius sought to create an environment in which people would naturally be harmonious and thus virtuous. He believed that harmony was an unavoidable result of li, because li was a perfect reflection of cosmic order. From a Confucian perspective, any land that acted according t ...
    Related: confucius, chinese society, social life, chinese civilization, buddhism
  • Confucius Was Believed To Have Been Born In 551 Bc, In The State - 746 words
    Confucius was believed to have been born in 551 BC., in the state of Lu, known today as the Shandong province. His parents, who died while he was a child, named him Kong Qui. Confucius was derived from the Latin word Kongfuzi which means Great Master Kong. Confucius was the most influential and respected philosopher in Chinese history. His ideas were the single strongest influence on Chinese society from around 100 BC. to the AD. 1900's. The Chinese government made his ideas the official state philosophy and many nearby countries honored his beliefs. Confucius wanted to gain the position as an adviser to a wise ruler, but he failed. He hoped to do this in order to be able to employ his ideas ...
    Related: born good, confucius, chinese society, political change, history
  • Contemporary China - 1,276 words
    Contemporary China Contemporary China The Republic of China has undergone many dramatic changes within a relatively short period of time. After centuries operating in the relative stability of Confucian ideals and tradition, Chinese society has been bombarded by the inflow of western ideals and commercialism. In his book Streetlife China, Michael Dutton makes observations concerning contemporary Chinese society and discusses the problems and advantages rapid economic development has brought upon China. Dutton's view on contemporary China is that of a society whose historical ideology contradicts the product of a capitalistic society. Dutton believes that Chinese society is conflicted between ...
    Related: china, contemporary, contemporary chinese, chinese society, foreign trade
  • It Is Important To Realize That The Treatment Of Women In China Had Its Roots In The Ancient Confucius Philosophy He Introduc - 1,480 words
    It is important to realize that the treatment of women in China had its roots in the ancient Confucius philosophy. He introduced the Five Human Relationships to the world in his Analectics. By making these relationships, he brought order to society. These relationships ranged from that of a father to a son, ruler to subject, husband to wife, older brother to younger brother, and friend to a friend. In all of these, except the last one, the first person was the superior to the second, and was supposed to set a good example and take care of the inferior. The second person, the inferior, owed respect and obedience to their superior. Friends were social equals who owed each other respect and cou ...
    Related: ancient china, century china, china, chinese women, confucius, philosophy, women in china
  • Khubilai Khan - 1,685 words
    Khubilai Khan The founder of China's Yuan, or Mongol, Dynasty was a brilliant statesman and military leader named Khubilai Khan. Grandson and the best-known successor of the great Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan, Khubiliai became the first emperor of the Mongol Empire. He completed the conquest of China that was begun by his grandfather. Khubilai's major accomplishment was convincing China to be ruled by foreign people, the Mongols. His achievements were first brought to the Western and European society in the writings of Marco Polo, the Venetian traveler who lived in China for nearly 20 years. Khubilai Khan began to play a significant part in the consolidation of Mongol rule when his brother, ...
    Related: genghis khan, great khan, khan, yangtze river, various religions
  • Propaganda In China During The Cultural Revolution Took On Many - 2,519 words
    ... n Biao (Dutt and Dutt, 1970: 80). Mao rightly saw that the best way to provide both direction for the Red Guards and to make himself immune from their attacks upon party official would be to foster a personality Cult. Thus under the guidance of Lin Biao who after Liu Shaoqi was removed; become the successor to Mao Lin Biao helped foster a personality Cult for Mao. Lin Biao used the same types of techniques that he used in the army to help foster this Cult of Mao. Lin Biao used the same organization to disseminate propaganda that he had devised for the Army. Lin Biao continued to head the army till his death in 1971 but his role was expanded as he became the high priest of the Cult of Mao ...
    Related: china, cultural revolution, propaganda, chinese people, national conference
  • Saul Perkins Us Multicultural Visions - 985 words
    Saul Perkins U.S. Multicultural Visions November 4th 1998 Paper 3 Ask any typical-looking Asian students around campus whether they are Chinese or Japanese and the reply will probably be universal: Neither, Im Chinese-American. In reality, developing a clear concept of exactly how they define themselves as a race has become a difficult thing to do in this day and age for most Chinese-Americans. Many have become so well adjusted to the American way of life, that the only thing still tying them to their ancestral roots is physical appearance and the answer to the SAT questionnaire about ethnicity background. This is the basis for the overall theme of The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. The Joy Luck ...
    Related: multicultural, perkins, saul, chinese family, cultural conflict
  • Tang Dynasty - 1,094 words
    Tang Dynasty The fall of the Sui in the early 17th century led to a new power, one that revolutionized the social and empirical structure. At its height, the Tang Empire stretched from what is now Manchuria in the northeast into what is now Vietnam in the southwest. Building on the reunification of northern China and the southern China by the Sui dynasty. The Tang Empire established a strong, centralized state system, which brought together the aristocratic clans of all regions, finally ended four centuries of division between northern and southern China. The Tang dynasty was a time of great prosperity, many religions such Buddhism, and Daoism (Taoism), and the literature, scholarship, and a ...
    Related: dynasty, tang, tang dynasty, chinese culture, silk road
  • The Boxer Rebellion - 1,692 words
    The Boxer Rebellion The Boxer Uprising China during the late nineteenth century was in turmoil from external and internal forces. The underlining internal pressures were exacerbated by the thrust of western imperialism and exploitation. Imperialism and the west were the catalyst for the Boxer Uprising. The ingredients of descent and conflict were always present in the late nineteenth century. China had its difficulties without the wests intrusion. The Boxer Uprising was a reaction against the West, not a rebellion against the Qing Dynasty. The Boxer uprising differs from Taping rebellion in that regard. In this essay, I will illustrate the slow incremental effects of the Imperialist powers o ...
    Related: boxer, boxer rebellion, rebellion, imperial china, opium wars
  • The Chinese Economy, Culture Society - 2,255 words
    The Chinese Economy, Culture & Society The social values and history have shaped and formed the economical developments and the current environment of business in the People's Republic of China. They have determined the patterns for negotiation and the Chinese perceptions of business, and their feelings towards westerners. The implicit and explicit rules that the Chinese society has on the development of businesses, and the economy in general, are very important issues for any person going into China to understand and consider. In order to achieve a successful partnership between Chinese and Western cultures it is essential to have a basic understanding of history and cultural developments t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese communist, chinese communist party, chinese culture, chinese economy, chinese family, chinese market
  • The Joy Luck Club - 1,058 words
    The Joy Luck Club The Joy Luck Club By Amy Tan Is it fair to judge someone by their sex? In traditional Chinese culture, many judgments were made about a person just by observing their sex. The woman was looked upon as an inferior being. They had little or no status in society, and little was expected from them. They were discriminated against when they tried to stand up for themselves. Chinese culture was customarily male dominated. The male was expected to do most of the work, and the woman was expected to stay at home with their mouth shut. This custom leaves an unwelcome feeling in a womans heart. They feel like no one cares, and it makes it much harder to live with an optimistic view on ...
    Related: club, joy luck club, luck, luck club, the joy luck club
  • The Life Of Mao Zedong - 1,065 words
    The Life Of Mao Zedong The Life of Mao Zedong Dressed in the drab military uniform that symbolized the revolutionary government of Communist China, Mao Zedong's body still looked powerful, like an giant rock in a gushing river. An enormous red flag draped his coffin, like a red sail unfurled on a Chinese junk, illustrating the dualism of traditional China and the present Communist China that typified Mao. 1 A river of people flowed past while he lay in state during the second week of September 1976. Workers, peasants, soldiers and students, united in grief; brought together by Mao, the helmsman of modern China. 2 He had assembled a revolutionary government using traditional Chinese ideals of ...
    Related: everyday life, mao zedong, zedong, political ideology, modern china
  • The Opium War - 1,265 words
    The Opium War The Opium War The Opium War, also called the Anglo-Chinese War, was the most humiliating defeat China ever suffered. In European history, it is perhaps the most sordid, base, and vicious event in European history, possibly, just possibly, overshadowed by the excesses of the Third Reich in the twentieth century. By the 1830's, the English had become the major drug-trafficking criminal organization in the world; very few drug cartels of the twentieth century can even touch the England of the early nineteenth century in sheer size of criminality. Growing opium in India, the East India Company shipped tons of opium into Canton which it traded for Chinese manufactured goods and for ...
    Related: opium, european history, drug trafficking, chinese history, prisoners
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