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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: chinese communist

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  • The Chinese Communist Revolution - 1,178 words
    The Chinese Communist Revolution The Chinese Communist Revolution During the mid 19th century many upheavals and rebellions launched China into a new course of modernization. These also lead to the creation of the Chinese Communist party (CCP) which in 1949 over through the government to take all government control. Mao Zedong Mao was born on December 26 in 1893, in a peasent family in Shao-shan in the Hunan province. As a child he worked in the fields and attended a local primary school. He was frequetly in conflict with his strict father. Beginning in 1911, the year that the republican forces of Sun Yat-Sen launched the overthrow of the Manchu dynasty, Mao spent allmost ten years in Chang- ...
    Related: chinese, chinese communist, chinese communist party, communist, communist party, communist revolution
  • To Say That The Chinese Communist Revolution Is A Nonwestern - 1,971 words
    To say that the Chinese Communist revolution is a non-Western revolution is more than a clich‚. That revolution has been primarily directed, not like the French Revolution but against alien Western influences that approached the level of domination and drastically altered China's traditional relationship with the world. Hence the Chinese Communist attitude toward China's traditional past is selectively critical, but by no means totally hostile. The Chinese Communist revolution, and the foreign policy of the regime to which it has given rise, have several roots, each of which is embedded in the past more deeply than one would tend to expect of a movement seemingly so convulsive. The Chi ...
    Related: chinese, chinese communist, chinese government, chinese people, chinese revolution, communist, communist manifesto
  • Australia And Asia Relationship - 1,209 words
    Australia and Asia relationship Australia and Asia relationship This essay analyses the Australian-China bilateral relationship since 1945 and in particular its political significance to Australia. Many global factors have influenced this relationship, including the advent of the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the collapse of the Soviet bloc European nations. In addition, internal political changes in Australia and China have both affected and been affected by the global changes. It will be analysed that Australia's bilateral relationship with China has always had a sharp political edge but that approaching the new millenium economics and trade considerations are shaping Austr ...
    Related: asia, asia pacific, australia, east asia, political system
  • China - 513 words
    China China China takes 40% of the earth's population; 1,210,004,956. Chinese people are permitted to chose what they grow on their small plots, to set their own prices and to pocket their profits without paying any taxes. Free Markets, is a big world in China: it refers to designated areas in the city where farmers are allowed to sell their products directly to city consumers. The government is no longer involved in growing, distribution or price setting. The system operates on supply and demand in private marketplace. Chinese people eat, dress, look better. China has the worlds biggest population, it has a fast economy. Dum Champagne, is a Chinese millionaire. Champagne started his busines ...
    Related: china, young people, blue gray, labor force, permitted
  • China 2000 - 1,724 words
    China 2000 CHINA 2000 What is China? Is it maybe the image of the ancient times with the glorious old dynasties, the powerful emperors, the wondrous temples, the fascinating winding gardens? Or is it maybe a strict communist world with uniformed people wearing Mao suits and living in dreary gray concrete apartment blocks? Or perhaps it is the skyscrapers of Hong Kong and Shanghai, the horrendous traffic, the buzzing commotion, ultra modern electronics and plate glass buildings? In reality, China is all this in one. It is a land that intertwines a miraculous ancestral heritage with a capitalist reality blooming in the heart of a still surviving communist system. In todays China, the gigantic ...
    Related: china, mainland china, chinese people, ancient times, relics
  • China And American Foreign Policy - 1,329 words
    China And American Foreign Policy China and American Foreign Policy Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the Cold War was over, making the U.S. the only superpower left in the world. This has made the international system much more tranquil, and relaxed. The only country potentially powerful besides the U.S., is China. Many Americans fear China, not only because they are communist, but also because of their huge population. Their population is 1.3 billion people, which accounts 1/5th of the worlds population. As one of the only potential superpowers in the world, it would be in the best interest of all Americans if the U.S. and China became allies, instead of enemies. Peace and development, e ...
    Related: american, american foreign, american foreign policy, china, foreign policy, foreign relations, south china
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Chinese Women - 1,153 words
    ... ot walk, but rather they limped with excruciating pain, leaning on walls or on other people for support and balance. The feet became so bad that women could not physically move freely or without another person and consequently they could do anything really meaningful with their lives.27 In wealthy families, servants took care of personal needs and carried the women when the feet were too weak for walking. Beside from the daily torture and soreness, problems like ulceration, paralysis, and gangrene developed. In extreme cases, about ten percent of Chinese girls died in the initial process of footbinding.28 The rise of communism in China challenged traditional beliefs about the role of wom ...
    Related: chinese, chinese communist, chinese communist party, chinese culture, chinese government, chinese society, chinese women
  • Communism History - 1,338 words
    Communism History Communism has long been heralded in capitalist countries as the root of all evil. However, as with all phobias, this intrinsic fear of communism comes from a lack of knowledge rather than sound reasoning. It is that same fear that gave the world the Cold War and McCarthys Red Scare. The purpose of this paper is neither to support communism over capitalism nor the reverse of that. Rather, it is to inform the reader of communisms migration through time and hopefully assist the regression of such fear. The ideology of communism came out of the minds of two men, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (Marxism, 11). (Dueto Marx being the more widely known influence, he will be the one m ...
    Related: communism, history, long history, red scare, long march
  • Communist China - 1,258 words
    Communist China Communism in an Economically Developing China The future of communism in China is unknown, as the world economy becomes more international. Communism has been in China since 1949 and is still present in the countrys activities. Presently China is undergoing incredible economic growth and promises to be a dominant power early in the next century. Chinas social tradition has come under heavy pressure from forces of modernization generated in a large part by the sustained contact with the West that began in the middle of the nineteenth century. The Western incursion, not only refined China militarily but brought in its course new ideas- nationalism, science and technology, and i ...
    Related: china, chinese communist, chinese communist party, communist, communist china, communist party
  • Democratization Of Taiwan - 1,421 words
    Democratization Of Taiwan Taiwan is an island country which is located off the southeast coast of China between the Taiwan Strait and the Philippine Sea. It has a land area of about 32,000 square kilometers, and claims another 3,700 square kilometers of sea around it, giving it close to a total of 36,000 square kilometers for itself. The land of Taiwan consists mainly of mountainous terrain in the east while the west has flat plains which can be compared to the middle central part of the United States. The country has a population of about 22 million people in which 9.7 million of those people are part of the labor force. Some of the groups that make up this population include native Taiwane ...
    Related: democratization, taiwan, different aspects, nationalist party, silent
  • Historical Criticism Of Mans Fate - 1,686 words
    Historical Criticism Of Man's Fate Man's Fate is a fictional story based on the 1927 Chinese revolution in Shanghai. The main characters, Ch'en, Kyo, May, Katov, and Old Gisors represent different facets of Malraux's belief system and personality. The story opens where Ch'en is in the room of a sleeping man who he's about to assassinate. The assassination of the businessman can be seen as the destruction of the capitalism Malraux saw as the cause of the "oppressed and exploited Chinese" (Greenlee 59). Malraux came from a broken home and had great empathy for the working class. As Ch'en is holding the dagger, he focuses on his victim's foot because he is about to destroy a living thing. Ch'en ...
    Related: criticism, historical criticism, mans, labor force, chinese art
  • History Of Asia - 1,161 words
    HISTORY OF ASIA HISTORY OF ASIA August of 1917 Japan was ready to reap her benefits of imperialism and she had her eyes on China. The exchange of the Lansing -Ishii Notes between the U.S. and Japan, this agreement granted territorial superiority of China to Japan. Japan interest in China mostly economic. The Japanese population was growing, cities were crowded, and consumer goods were scares and its standard of living extremely low. A major earthquake also adds to Japans plight. Japan was a small island limited in natural resources and inhabitable space. The Japanese saw the turmoil in China as an opportunity to divide conquer and move in. Japan had been recognized as one of the Big Five pow ...
    Related: asia, history, consumer goods, communist revolution, transformation
  • Human Rights In China - 1,313 words
    Human Rights In China One of the first things that come to mind about human rights in China would most likely be the Tiananmen Square massacre, where in 1989 hundreds of student protestors lost their lives to the People's Republic of China. The bloody body of a dead student removed from the street right after the Tiananmen Square crackdown on June 4, 1989. Web page http://www.rjgeib.com/thoughts/china/china.html The name People's Republic of China seems a contradiction of its meaning. If indeed its name is the People's Republic of China than why did it massacre peaceful protestors with tanks and machine guns? But the Chinese government argues that the force was necessary for maintaining a na ...
    Related: china, human rights, international human, international human rights, people's republic of china, privacy rights
  • Is China Unstable - 1,074 words
    Is China Unstable Is China Unstable? Foreign Policy Research Institute Wire, July 1999 By Minxin Pei Western attitudes toward China tend to oscillate between two extremes, often with confusing rapidity. Not too long ago China was widely portrayed as an emerging military and economic threat to the West. Its total economic output was projected to surpass that of the United States in two decades. Its military modernization was expected to provide China the capability to project its power far beyond its borders (and the recent Cox report on nuclear espionage has revived those concerns). And its authoritarian regime was supposed to be able to retain its grip on power for a long time. Nowadays, ho ...
    Related: china, unstable, foreign policy, political system, unrest
  • Kennedynixon Debates - 1,889 words
    Kennedy-Nixon Debates In the Presidential Election of 1960 John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Richard Milhouse Nixon were in a series of debates that were different from past debates. The three biggest national television networks arranged for the debate to be televised on all three stations. The Democratic candidate, Senator Kennedy from Massachusetts, and Vice President Nixon both agreed on the televised debates. Each debate was given a subject matter that the candidates agreed to correspond their answers with the subject. The first debate was for the issues concerning domestic questions, the second was centered around the area of foreign policy, and the third and fourth debates were basically a ...
    Related: pacific islands, subject matter, american people, budget, pertaining
  • Kim Il Sung - 1,405 words
    Kim Il Sung Kim Il Sung was the pseudonym for Kim Song Ju. He was born on April 15, 1912, at Mangyongdae, Pyongyang, to a poor peasant family. He and his family emigrated to Manchuria in the 1920's like many Korean families did at the time. His family was a most patriotic and revolutionary one, and fought for many generations, from the beginning of the modern revolutionary movement of the Korean people for the independence of the country. He grew up receiving his revolutionary education at home, and acquiring a revolutionary outlook on the world through study and revolutionary practice. In Manchuria, he attended a Chinese school. He rallied young students around revolutionary organizations, ...
    Related: kim il sung, sung, soviet union, negative consequences, campaign
  • Mao Tsetung - 1,020 words
    Mao Tse-Tung Mao Tse-Tung was a revolutionary person in his era; his ideas and actions have changed the lives of billions of Chinese people. Mao's motifs were made to make the people of the People Republic of China live a life free from poverty and live in a more pleasant place. Mao used many methods to make this possible but some of them were cruel and inhumane, the consequences of his actions marked the Chinese for many generations and will continue. Mao was born December 26, 1893, into a peasant family in the village of Shaoshan, Hunan province. This harsh upbringing made him know the impact of living in poverty, he wanted the others in his country to be rid of this adversity. Although Ch ...
    Related: political power, chinese communist party, chinese people, magistrate, village
  • Politics And The Truman Macarthur Contoversy - 1,946 words
    Politics And The Truman/ Macarthur Contoversy July 7,2000 Politics and the Truman/MacArthur Controversy The precarious peace following World War II was at times only seconds from degenerating into a world wide nuclear war. The intensity of the cold war allowed for minimal error in foreign policy. It was during this tense and volatile time that General Douglas MacArthur fought what some deem his war in Korea. While he had proven himself time and again a brilliant military leader, his behavior was not impeccable. He tended to rely too much on his own authority, a trait not dear to Congress or the President. It was this tendency towards insubordination and his flagrant vocal outbursts that resu ...
    Related: american politics, general douglas macarthur, harry s truman, president truman, truman
  • Propaganda In China During The Cultural Revolution Took On Many - 2,409 words
    Propaganda in China during the Cultural Revolution took on many forms; there were mass Red Guard demonstrations in Tianamen Square in support of Mao Zedong, pictures of Mao were put up in every conceivable location from restaurants to the wallpaper in nurseries, and pamphlets and books of Mao's teachings were distributed to every Chinese citizen. One of these propaganda publications Quotations from Chairman Mao which later became known as the Little Red Book contained quotes from Mao Zedong and was distributed to every Chinese citizen. The history of the Red Book provides one of the best ways in which to analyze Chinese propaganda during the Cultural Revolution and see the ways in which the ...
    Related: china, chinese revolution, cultural revolution, propaganda, russian revolution
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