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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: chinese

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  • Change Of Chinese Theory - 811 words
    Change Of Chinese Theory Western film theory is generally subdivided into classical theory and contemporary theory. Contemporary theory consists of a theoretical system, which employs psychoanalysis, ideological critique and feminism to interpret cinematic forms. It originated in the mid-sixties and flourished in the 1970s. It was first introduced to China in the early 1980s and brought in as a complete theoretical system a few years later. Peaking in the late 1980s, it should have taken up an important position in the development of China's film theory. Classical film theory had developed very slowly in China, and by the end of the 1970s it had acquired the following features: It was a theo ...
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  • Chinese American Fortune Cookie - 986 words
    Chinese American Fortune Cookie Crack! The shell of the fortune cookie drops to the floor of the restaruant and the white scrap of paper is being read repeatidly until it to is carelessly lost to the floor. Floating through the air, trying to hold on to the last bit of life before it reaches the trenches of the restaruant floor, wishing the ink upon it spelled out a sentence that the owner would have liked to have heard. Instead, it was brushed away because the cultural and symbolic traits that were spelled out were not recognized by the owner. In the novel The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan explores significant issues of Chinese culture and their influences on the lives of four pairs of mothers an ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, chinese, chinese american, chinese culture, cookie
  • Chinese American Fortune Cookie - 1,038 words
    ... he was married to a bad man who left her after a short time to follow other women. Her love for him turned to hate, and she killed her unborn baby. This act gave her remorse for all her life since she considered it a murder. Tortured by this incident, she had a mental breakdown, for a period of time, when her second son -- with her second husband, St. Clair -- died at birth. She saw it as a punishment for her previous behavior. After leaving her first husband's house and returning home, she abandoned herself to whatever life offered her. She lived like a shadow, letting other people or events to decide for her. When she met St. Clair, she passively let him believe that she was from a poo ...
    Related: american, american culture, american girl, american life, chinese, chinese american, chinese culture
  • Chinese Art During The Early Empire - 1,787 words
    Chinese Art During The Early Empire In this essay, I will look at the outpouring of thought, art and literature during the early empire. More so though, I will focus on what factors led to this renewed focus on culture in the early empire. It would seem that there were several factor which would lead to this renewed interest in culture in early China, but the most significant of these factors would be the re-establishment of a strong central government. This re-establishment of a strong central government laid the foundation for cultural growth. It brought with it prosperity to China, through improved infrastructure, such as the canals and graineries. As a result of these improvements, China ...
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  • Chinese Attitudes Towards Death - 1,976 words
    ... c. 1989. Throughout the history of mankind, death has always been a fascination. People have always wondered about the causes of death, the aftermath of death, and whether it could be stopped. Among these people were the Chinese, who like many other people, believed there was life after death. They performed certain rituals to help them along their way. Chinese attitudes toward death are reflected in funerary rituals, Buddhist philosophy and reverence for the deceased. Death is a very important issue to the Chinese people. The son of a family has the obligation to give his parents a proper funeral. This includes such essential elements as; a large coffin, a funeral procession, a well-ch ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, chinese tradition, death & dying, life after death, traditional chinese
  • Chinese Book Report - 970 words
    Chinese Book Report China Book Report Book: China Since 1945 Author: Stewart Ross (Note: This book is not described in full depth and detail but is just explained in a very general way, therefore Mahmoud Abdelkader uses The Modernization of China by Gilbert Rozman (Editor) excerpts to support his views) Type of Book: Illustrated Pages: 64 China Book Report The book China Since 1945, written by author Stewart Ross, opens in a description of the Chinese Empire in the 1900s. There it describes the terrain of the Chinese lands and thoroughly states the fact of having the Great Wall of China to keep out the barbarians at 221 B.C. The author uses a very admiring tone of the Chinese Empire and seem ...
    Related: book report, chinese, chinese empire, negative effect, communist revolution
  • Chinese Democracy Movements - 2,363 words
    Chinese Democracy Movements In 1978, stimulated by the opening of China to the West and also by the "reversal of verdicts" against the 1976 Tiananmen protesters (These demonstrations against the gang of four had been condemned as counter-revolutionary at the time but were now declared a revolutionary act), thousands of Chinese began to put their thoughts into words, their words onto paper and their paper onto walls to be read by passers by. The most famous focus of these displays became a stretch of blank wall just to the west of the former forbidden city in Beijing, part of which was now a museum and park and part the cluster of residences for China's most senior National leaders. Because o ...
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  • Chinese Economic Strategies - 1,903 words
    Chinese Economic Strategies Current Chinese economic strategies have blast the country into the world economy at full speed. While China's economy had been growing at nine percent a year over the past ten years, which led to China's gross domestic product to rise to the seventh in the world. However, with 1.3 billion people China remains a market with great potential for U.S. exporters. U.S. exports to China grew a meager two percent in 1996, but increased by 6.9 percent in 1997. The strongest growth in U.S. exports to China was in the services sector, which showed a positive trade balance in 1997 of $1.1 billion. In 1979 the Chinese have implemented numerous economic and political tactics t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese economic, chinese economy, chinese government, chinese market, chinese trade, economic benefits
  • Chinese Economy - 956 words
    Chinese Economy If China's economy grows as fast for the next 20 years as it has for the past 14, it will be the biggest economy on earth: I feel that China's drastic improvements over the last 14 years are overwhelming, with their Real GNP growing at a rate of 9% a year, which means by, 1994, China's economy will match the performance of countries like Japan and Taiwan. China's standard of living has also increased, and the number of people who were considered absolutely poor decreased approximately 63%. I feel with the vast amount of people living in China, and the economic activity booming like it is, China's exports will continue to grow, as well as the standard of living. This will crea ...
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  • Chinese Medicine - 1,489 words
    Chinese Medicine Acupuncture, Qigong, and Chinese Medicine Stephen Barrett, M.D. Chinese medicine, often called Oriental medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), encompasses a vast array of folk medical practices based on mysticism. It holds that the body's vital energy (chi or qi) circulates through 14 channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. Illness is attributed to imbalance or interruption of chi.. Ancient practices such as acupuncture and Qigong are claimed to restore balance. Traditional acupuncture, as now practiced, involves the insertion of stainless steel needles into various body areas. A low-frequency current may be applied t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine, traditional chinese, traditional chinese medicine
  • Chinese Medicine - 1,419 words
    ... tions. A parallel survey of 197 acupuncturists, who are more apt to see immediate complications, yielded 132 cases of fainting, 26 cases of increased pain, 8 cases of pneumothorax, and 45 other adverse results [10]. However, a 5-year study involving 76 acupuncturists at a Japanese medical facility tabulated only 64 adverse event reports (including 16 forgotten needles and 13 cases of transient low blood pressure) associated with 55,591 acupuncture treatments. No serious complications were reported.The researchers concluded that serious adverse reactions are uncommon among acupuncturists who are medically trained [11]. Questionable Standards In 1971, an acupuncture boom occurred in the Un ...
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  • Chinese Pottery - 470 words
    Chinese Pottery Chinese Pottery The earliest Chinese pottery of which we have any records is the Neolithic ware from the river plains and loess highlands of north and north-west China. It was made between 5000 and 2000 B.C. and contains bowls, jars, pots and beakers of low-fires earthenware. This pots were not turned on a wheel but were buildt up by what is known as the Coil Method. That is, a long sausage of clay was wound carefully up into a coil shape and this coil was smoothed and patted by hand into the shape of a pot. During the Tang Dynasty China became the greatest and most widespread empire in the world . Tang pottery is powerful and lively with sweeping sinuous curves while its dec ...
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  • Chinese Prostitutes In 1900s - 1,248 words
    Chinese Prostitutes In 1900'S In California, between 1850's to the Chinese Exclusion Act, most of the Chinese women who came to San Francisco were either slaves or indentured. They were often lured, kidnapped or purchased and forced to work as prostitutes at the brothels which is run by secret society of the Tongs of San Francisco. Chinese prostitutes also were smuggled and had worked at the Chinatown brothels in the Comstock Mines in Nevada. Chinese prostitutes were commonly known as prostitutes of the lowest order. "Both outcast slatterns and Asian slaves stood at the edge of the irregular marketplace, far more socially stigmatized than ordinary prostitutes." The demand for Chinese prostit ...
    Related: chinese, chinese exclusion, chinese exclusion act, chinese women, spanish-american war
  • Chinese Prostitutes In 1900s - 1,294 words
    ... erson. For some prostitutes, suicide, madness or a violent death proved to be the only way out of misery. One prostitute tried to run away from her owner and hide in the Nevada hills. By the time she was found, both her feet had frozen and had to be amputated, and in the end she courted death by refusing to take medicine or food. In another instance, a popular dance hall girl nicknamed "The Yellow Doll" by her admirers in Deadwood, South Dakota, was found "chopped into pieces" in 1876. In Virginia City, Nevada, six Chines prostitutes committed suicide to escape enslavement. Most prostitutes did not have the individual or collective means to resist their fate. Refusing to work only brough ...
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  • Chinese Society - 1,573 words
    Chinese Society China Paper CHINESE SOCIETY Even since the dramatic post-1949 changes in China regarding the role of women, China has remained paternalistic in it's attitudes and social reality. The land reform, which was intended to create a more balanced economic force in marriage, was the beginning of governmental efforts to pacify women, with no real social effect. Communist China needed to address the woman question. Since women wanted more equality, and equality is doled out from the hands of those in power,capitalism was examined. The economic issues of repressed Chinese women were focused on the Land Act and the Marriage Act of 1950. The Land reform succeeded in eliminating the exten ...
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  • Chinese Way To Market Economy - 824 words
    Chinese Way To Market Economy Introduction Beginning in late 1978 the Chinese leadership has been trying to move the economy from a sluggish Soviet-style centrally planned economy to a more market-oriented economy but still within a rigid political framework of Communist Party control. To this end the authorities switched to a system of household responsibility in agriculture in place of the old collectivization, increased the authority of local officials and plant managers in industry, permitted a wide variety of small-scale enterprise in services and light manufacturing, and opened the economy to increased foreign trade and investment. The result has been a quadrupling of GDP since 1978 (C ...
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  • Chinese Women - 1,217 words
    Chinese Women China, located in East Asia, is the third largest country by area and the largest country by population in the world. While China has one-fifth of the world's total population, and it also has one of the earliest civilizations, dating back to some 5000 years ago. China is often distinguished for its technological advances and intelligence, but in the early 20th century, Chinese society was far from perfect. The women in China, lived a slow and difficult life, bound by tradition and obedience. Women had to bind their feet at birth or face adversity throughout their entire lives. Footbinding was a painful process that allowed women to be thought of as beautiful and a good future ...
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  • Chinese Women - 1,153 words
    ... ot walk, but rather they limped with excruciating pain, leaning on walls or on other people for support and balance. The feet became so bad that women could not physically move freely or without another person and consequently they could do anything really meaningful with their lives.27 In wealthy families, servants took care of personal needs and carried the women when the feet were too weak for walking. Beside from the daily torture and soreness, problems like ulceration, paralysis, and gangrene developed. In extreme cases, about ten percent of Chinese girls died in the initial process of footbinding.28 The rise of communism in China challenged traditional beliefs about the role of wom ...
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  • Chinese Women - 467 words
    Chinese Women Women Situation in China Yuan Jiang CCF 9659 (Wednesday, December 4, 1996) -------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------ The current China men and women debate was strayed off from the issue of women's condition in China. Few articles give a comprehensive picture on the condition. First, Chinese tradition, like others, believes that the right place for women is home. Contacts with the west at the turn of this century did bring changes to the treatment of women, e.g. feet bonding and education. But the destiny of women was still home. The communist revolution brought Soviet ideas and practices to China. The idea is that men and women are equal. ...
    Related: chinese, chinese tradition, chinese women, men and women, work force
  • Confucianism, The Philosophical System Based On The Teaching Of Confucius 551479 Bc, Dominated Chinese Sociopolitical Life Fo - 1,161 words
    Confucianism, the philosophical system based on the teaching of Confucius (551-479 BC), dominated Chinese sociopolitical life for most of Chinese history and largely influenced the cultures of Korea, Japan, and Indochina. The Confucian school functioned as a recruiting ground for government positions, which were filled by those scoring highest on examinations in the Confucian classics. It also blended with popular and imported religions and became the vehicle for articulating Chinese mores to the peasants. The school's doctrines supported political authority using the theory of the mandate of Heaven. It sought to help the rulers maintain domestic order, preserve tradition, and uphold a const ...
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