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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: african culture

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  • African Culture - 1,532 words
    African Culture When trying to compare and contrast the music-culture and society of the Mbuti and that of the Venda, it becomes difficult to comment on sound when we haven't heard any Venda music. It's easy to recognize that for the Mbuti the music embodies the heart of the forest, and for the Venda the relation to nature is the act of a mother giving birth. Thinking about concept and behavior this makes the music performed by the two cultures separate and distinguishable. This is where culture and environment become important factors. How noticeable is this when listening to the music of both peoples? When given the opportunity to listen, without a trained ear, it would be difficult to fin ...
    Related: african, african culture, popular music, social issues, humor
  • African Culture - 1,517 words
    African Culture "Things Fall Apart" - short summary of the book, analysis of African Culture before by appearance of white man. Things fall apart, is the story of an Ibo village- Umuofia , which takes place in the late 1800s. Things Fall Apart analyzes the destruction of African culture by the appearance of the white man (Christian Missionaries) in terms of the destruction of the bonds between individuals and their society. Christian Missionaries try to convert the people of the Ibo society to Christianity, and in their efforts of doing so, they bring about a downfall in the social and cultural structure of the people in this society. Like the title suggests Things fall apart in the society ...
    Related: african, african culture, second wife, fall apart, avenge
  • A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana - 538 words
    A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana Paringauxs article A Day in the Life of Catherine Bana, is one that is both moving and informative. Its description of the daily routine of a wife and mother from Balkoui shocks most American readers with the graphic reality of life in the impoverished nation. The article provides a vivid description of the geography of Sahel, the roles of males and females in this society, and the impact of recent international development. The families of Burknina-Faso depend on agriculture as the main source of their meager incomes. The climate and other geographical factors virtually shape the life Catherine Bana. She spends her days tending to the livestock and crops. ...
    Related: catherine, life expectancy, infant mortality, african culture, discusses
  • African American In The Colonial Era - 1,017 words
    African American In The Colonial Era African Americans in the Colonial Era An African American is an American of African descent. In the book African Americans in the Colonial Era, the story is told how this descends came about. When Africans were brought from Africa to the new world to become slaves, many changes occurred in their culture. Among these changes in culture, has emerged a new race: The African American. When slavery began in English North America, nearly all the slaves came from the coast and interior of West and West Central Africa. A few came from the Mozambique coast or Madagascar, around the Cape of Good Hope. In coming to the Americas, these Africans kept religion as the h ...
    Related: african, african american, african american history, african culture, african religions, american, american history
  • African Art - 419 words
    African Art The traditional art of Africa plays a major part in the African society. Most ceremonies and activities (such as singing, dancing, storytelling, ect.) can not function without visual art. It can also be used as an implement and insignia of rank or prestige, or have a religious significance.African art consists mainly of sculptures, paintings, fetishes, masks, figures, and decorative objects. Sculptures are considered to be the greatest achievement for African art. A majority of the sculptures are done in wood but are also made of metal, stone, terra-cotta, mud, beadwork, ivory, and other materials. It is found in many parts of Africa but mainly in western and central Africa. Many ...
    Related: african, african art, african culture, musical instruments, central africa
  • African Dimensions Of The Stono Rebellion - 395 words
    African Dimensions of the Stono Rebellion When studying the Stono Rebellion of 1739, historians only had one eyewitness report of this. I think the reason they didnt document it very well was because the Southerners were so outnumbered by the slaves, they didnt want the other slaves to get ideas of rebellion. The historians also failed to look at the big picture. What they were in Africa. This played a big role in the Stono Rebellion. To understand the full role of Africa, one has to look at the kingdom of Kongo between 1680 and 1740 rather than just a broad overview of the African culture. This is due to the diversity of the Africans language and culture. Part of this uprising is due to the ...
    Related: african, african culture, rebellion, slave trade, religious leaders
  • African Women - 1,489 words
    African Women Introduction 70% of African women with disabilities get them from their husbands. In Africa, most women have little or no rights. This effects what they can do for work, how their family life is, and what future they have. Women throughout time, especially in African culture, have always been subservient to men. The status of women in Africa is second-rate. In countries like the United States, women have the same rights as men and are almost equal. But in Africa its totally different. Women have to know that they should be equal to men. It's important to understand that every race is discriminated at one point in time. This should not happen if we have a realization. This under ...
    Related: african, african culture, african women, black women, century women, men and women, pregnant women
  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
    Related: american, american identity, national identity, huckleberry finn, missouri compromise
  • Atlantic Slave Trade - 615 words
    Atlantic Slave Trade Atlantic Slave Trade When most people talk about or think about slavery, they look at how it effected the US. The Atlantic Slave Trade had a huge effect on the US but there are no words or expressions that can describe the effects it had on Africa and its familys. It is estimated that between 1450 and 1900, there were 11,698,000 slaves exported from Africa. (Atlantic Slave trade, pg.170) To understand the effects this had on Africa you must consider the families that lost relatives, the stores that lost business, and even the friends that lost friendships. None of the misfortunes can be brought back or replaced. The many lives that were taken can never be brought back to ...
    Related: atlantic, atlantic slave trade, slave, slave trade, point of view
  • Berbers In North Africa - 1,894 words
    Berbers In North Africa The modern-day region of Maghrib - the Arab West consisting of present-day Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia - is inhabited predominantly by Muslim Arabs, but it has a large Berber minority. North Africa served as a transit region for peoples moving toward Europe or the Middle East. Thus, the region's inhabitants have been influenced by populations from other areas. Out of this mix developed the Berber people, whose language and culture, although pushed from coastal areas by conquering and colonizing Carthaginians, Romans, and Byzantines, dominated most of the land until the spread of Islam and the coming of the Arabs. The purpose of this research is to examine the influen ...
    Related: africa, north africa, north african, atlantic ocean, cave paintings
  • Capoiera - 1,211 words
    Capoiera Capoeira is the common name for the group of African martial arts that came out of west Africa and were modified and mixed in Brazil. These original styles included weapons, grappling and striking as well as animal forms that became incorporated into different components and sub styles of the art. In 1500's the Portuguese, led by explorer Pedro Alvares Cabral, arrived in Brazil. One of the first measures taken by the new arrivals was the conquering of the local population, the Brazilian Indians, in order to allow the Portuguese slave labor (for sugarcane and cotton). The experience with the Indians was a failure. The Indians quickly died in captivity or fled to their nearby homes. T ...
    Related: martial arts, large numbers, men and women, self-confidence, reliable
  • Chinua Achebe - 1,424 words
    Chinua Achebe Chinua Achebe Chinua Achebe is said to be "one of the most influential writers" of the century not only in Nigeria, his homeland but also throughout the world (Albany). Chinua Achebe was born in Ogidi, Nigeria on November 16, 1930. He was born a son of a Chrisitan Churchman, Isaiah Okafo and Janet N. Achebe. Achebe was raised an Ibo Christian, which made him stand out among his fellow peers. Achebe's lifestyle was different than that of other people living in his village because of his religious background and upbringing. When Achebe was fourteen he began schooling at Government Albany College in Umuahia for three years. He then attended the University of Ibadan from 1948 throu ...
    Related: achebe, chinua, chinua achebe, western world, personal experience
  • Christianity In Nigeria - 951 words
    Christianity In Nigeria Ashley Gulke Prfessor Haas Compostion 2 27 April 2001 Independent Churches in Nigeria Several religions coexist in Nigeria, helping to accentuate regional and ethnic distinctions (Kane 86). Religion is often times the source of customs, culture, happiness and wars: it influences nearly every facet of our life. In Nigeria, the main religions are Christianity, paganism, and Islam. Christianity began to spread in the 19th century and has continued to spread up through the 21st century. The major spread of the Christian church in Nigeria is clearly credited to the independent churches of the Nigerian people. Portuguese Catholic priests, who landed on the shore of Nigeria ...
    Related: christianity, nigeria, nineteenth century, the bible, literature
  • Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth - 1,597 words
    Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth? In his article "Cultural relativism and cultural values", Melville Herkovits defines the principle of cultural relativism as "judgements are based on experience, and experience is interpreted by each individual in terms of his own enculturation" (26). This is the basic premise of cultural relativism, that beliefs, values, and morals are all based on one's culture. Therefore, since morality is based on society and different societies have different views of right and wrong, there can be no moral absolutes. Since there are no absolutes, under this view of cultural relativism all moral views determined by one's cultur ...
    Related: african culture, american culture, cultural relativism, cultural values, western culture
  • Daughters Of The Dust - 1,182 words
    Daughters Of The Dust "Daughters of the Dust," by Julie Dash is a film rich with symbolism and meaning. The film is set in Ibo Landing where the ancestors of enslaved Africans were said to have walked across the water in an attempt to return to their homeland. The Peazant family gathered on a day in 1920 in order to prepare for a journey across the water from their secluded home to the mainland, and to mainstream American society. I had to watch the movie several times before I was able to identify the many themes that Dash has chosen to weave together in this"artsy" film presentation. Of the many symbols that appear throughout the film, I have found one of the simplest to be the most profou ...
    Related: dust, american society, the bible, african culture, profound
  • Expressionism Is A Much Less Important Current In Sculpture Than In Painting, Since The Ethnographic Sculpture By The Fauves - 1,580 words
    Expressionism is a much less important current in sculpture than in painting, since the ethnographic sculpture by the Fauves might have evoked a strong response among sculptors Only one important sculptor shared in this rediscovery Brancusi, a Rumanian, moved to Paris to study advanced art around 1904 But he was more interested in the formal simplicity and coherence of primitive carvings than in their savage expressiveness; this is evidenced in The Kiss which was executed in 1909 Brancusi had a 'genius of ommission' - to Brancusi a monument is an upright slab, symmetrical and immobile - a permanent marker like the styles of the ancients and he disturbed the basic shape as little as possible ...
    Related: ethnographic, expressionism, modern sculpture, sculpture, african culture
  • Invisible Man - 829 words
    Invisible Man The constraints described in "The Invisible Man" imply we live in a country that is divided by race, ethnicity, religion and class (prejudices towards differences). A person's life is then heavily shaped around these perimeters. Some in the minority unfortunately try to deny these barriers to entry of the American elite by ignoring warnings and repressing past and present disparities and replacing them with hope. This behavior is brought forth by the natural defiance of a human to not be made believe that he is inferior, and from the confusion between the meanings of the laws of desegregation and social integration. The story of the Invisible Man describes the hardship and real ...
    Related: invisible, invisible man, african american, middle class, taboo
  • Motivation - 1,248 words
    Motivation Motivation explains why people behave as they do. Some scientists view motivation as the factor that determines behaviour, as expressed in the phrase All behaviour is motivated.(World Book, 1986, p.721). Other scientists focus on two certain aspects of motivated behaviour, excitement or exhilaration of behaviour, that is motivation arouses an organism and causes it to act, and the direction of behaviour, which is lead by habits, skills, abilities and structural features. (World Book, 1986). This essay aims to describe the four theories of motivation, Instinct theory, Sociobiology, Drive-Reduction theory and Incentive theory. I will be relating each theory to George`s behaviour and ...
    Related: human motivation, motivation, african culture, world book, drinking
  • Quinn On Heart Of Darkness - 1,445 words
    Quinn On Heart Of Darkness Quinn on Heart of Darkness We cannot read Quinns Ishmael without re-evaluating ourselves. Quinn confronts us with powerful revelations about mankind. According to Quinn, if we continue to live in our taker lifestyles, we will eventually destroy ourselves. Conrads Heart of Darkness illustrates a real life manifestation of Quinns insights. Written nearly a century ago, Conrads tale of early English imperialistic taker lifestyle still resembles present day taker lifestyle. We still try to rule other lands and people. We still have the attitude that everything centers on man. We still exhaust Earths resources and kill its creations. Above all, we still do all this with ...
    Related: darkness, heart of darkness, quinn, the harlequin, real life
  • Slavery - 1,044 words
    Slavery In London in June of 1606, King James I, the reigning monarch of England, issued what would forever change the lives and destiny of the world. The king granted a group of entrepreneurs a charter, allowing them to settle the vastly unknown lands of the newly discovered continent of America. In 1607, a group of ill-suited settlers landed in the Chesapeake region of North America and established the colony of Jamestown. Ravaged by starvation, disease, and natives, the hapless settlers found little success in the early years of the colony. Only through John Smiths leadership and poise did the colony manage to survive the first few grueling years. John Rolfes contributions ultimately save ...
    Related: slavery, african culture, early years, north america, tobacco
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