Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: child labor

  • 72 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Child Labor - 1,192 words
    Child Labor Hulbert 1 Child labor is a serious moral issue. There have been many controversial debates over whether it should be legal or not. Two different viewpoints on the subject exist. Many argue that child labor is morally wrong and that the children should not work, no matter how poverty stricken their family might be. Advocates and major corporations that support child labor argue that it is good because it gives poverty-stricken families a source of income. Child labor first appeared with the development of domestic systems (when people became civilized). It was widely practiced in England, America, and other countries during the 16th-18th centuries. Children were paid very little f ...
    Related: child labor, labor, personal opinion, moral issue, succeeding
  • Child Labor - 1,523 words
    Child Labor Child Labor In the past few years, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the global problem of child labor. Virtually everyone is guilty of participating in this abusive practice through the purchase of goods made in across the globe, usually in poor, developing nations. This issue has been around for a great length of time but has come to the forefront recently because of reports that link well known American companies like Wal-Mart and Nike to the exploitation of children. Prior to this media attention, many Americans and other people in developed nation were blind to the reality of the oppressive conditions that are reality to many. Child Labor has been in existence in d ...
    Related: child labor, fair labor, fair labor standards act, international labor, labor, labor organization, labor practices
  • Child Labor - 1,502 words
    Child Labor Introduction Child labor is a serious problem in many parts of the world, especially in developing countries. Labor is defined as physical or mental work especially of the hard or fatiguing kind. (Websters Dictionary) Child labor usually means work that is done by children under the age of 15, which restricts or damages their physical, emotional, intellectual, social, or spiritual growth as children. The International Labor organization estimates that there are 250 million children worldwide, between the ages of 5 and 14, who are now working. Africa and Asia together account for over 90 percent of total child employment (Faraaz Siddiqi) Child labor is especially common in the rur ...
    Related: child labor, child labour, international labor, labor, labor issues, labor organization
  • Child Labor - 1,280 words
    Child Labor Child Labor Child labor refers to the economic active population under the age of 15 years employed in various industries (Grootaert, 2). According to the Microsoft Encarta, child labor is now used to denote the employment of minors in work that may interfere with their education or endanger their health (IPEC, 1). Child labor has grown to be a topic of widespread debate. It has many favorable and unfavorable points of view. In any case, child labor should be eradicated as it is harmful to the health of the children, it is an obstacle to their education, and it denies them a happy childhood. Child labor is common in agriculture, domestic service, the sex industry, the carpet and ...
    Related: child labor, development child, labor, labor market, job stress
  • Child Labor During The Industrial Revolution - 368 words
    Child Labor During The Industrial Revolution Child Labor During the Industrial Revolution Many families were so poor during the Industrial Revolution time period that they had to send their children to work also. Women and children made very low wages compared to men. Child labor was at its peak during this time. The youngest children in the textile factories were usually employed as scavengers and piecers. Children at the age of five and six would work sometimes up to eighteen hours a day under dangerous conditions at factories. Scavengers Scavengers had to pick up the loose cotton from under the machinery. This was extremely dangerous as the children were expected to carry out the task whi ...
    Related: child labor, industrial revolution, labor, severely
  • Child Labor In Pakistan - 658 words
    Child Labor In Pakistan Child Labor in Pakistan Ryan Eagleton November 6, 1999 & John Hammer Child labor is a byproduct of the industrial revolution and was used mainly because Child Labor is a cheap labor force, and because of the child size they could get into places where adults could not. During the late 18th, through the 19th century there has been a visible effort to eliminate child labor. Unfortunately most of the developing countries do not follow the child labor laws because they need the labor force, and the economy, that the global conglomerates like Disney, Nike, and Wal-mart give them. Pakistan is a rather poor country. Many families go through a constant struggle everyday just ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor force, labor laws, pakistan
  • Child Labor In Victorian England - 1,064 words
    Child Labor In Victorian England "The report described the children as Chained, belted, harnessed like dogs...black, saturated with wet, and more than half-naked, crawling upon their hands and knees, and dragging their heavy loads behind them" (Yancey 34). This quote from Ivor Brown probably best describes the strenuous work preformed by a child laborer during the Victorian Era. Child laborers played an important part in developing the countrys economy. Children, one of the main sources of labor in Victorian England, endured less than adequate living and working conditions. During the Victorian Period children were good sources of labor. Beginning work as young as six or seven employers saw ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor force, victorian, victorian england, victorian period
  • Child Labor In Victorian England - 1,068 words
    Child Labor In Victorian England Child Labor in Victorian England The report described the children as Chained, belted, harnessed like dogsblack, saturated with wet, and more than half-naked, crawling upon their hands and knees, and dragging their heavy loads behind them (Yancey 34). This quote from Ivor Brown probably best describes the strenuous work preformed by a child laborer during the Victorian Era. Child laborers played an important part in developing the countrys economy. Children, one of the main sources of labor in Victorian England, endured less than adequate living and working conditions. During the Victorian Period children were good sources of labor. Beginning work as young as ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor force, victorian, victorian england, victorian period
  • Everyone Has The Right To Work, To Free Choice Of - 1,083 words
    "Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work. . .Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social service." These are excerpts from the Declaration of Human Rights. Written over 50 years ago, the Declaration was created to give, "inherent dignity and. . .equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family." The Declaration gave hope to many people across the globe who were living in tyranny and oppression, hoping for equality and fair treatment. Unfortunately for some, this document t ...
    Related: free choice, human beings, child labor, human rights, facing
  • Arab Nationalism - 1,081 words
    Arab Nationalism HARVEY: The global march against child labor was born in a conversation that I had with Kailash Satyarthi-- the very charismatic leader of the move to bring children out of bonded labor in India-- the head of the South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude. KAILASH: We have ample proof that the children are being used as slaves. They are bought and sold. They are tortured. They are confined to workplace. They are not able to leave their jobs. HARVEY: These are kids working in brick kilns, working in farms as a part of bonded farm labor, working in granite quarries; kids in sexual slavery, or being trafficked across national or state boundaries for sexual purposes. Those are the ...
    Related: arab, nationalism, human rights, good thing, track
  • Blood, Sweat Shears: A Closer Look At Sweatshops - 1,180 words
    Blood, Sweat & Shears: A Closer Look At Sweatshops Blood, Sweat, and Shears: A Closer Look at Sweatshops How can you tell if the product you are about to purchase was made by a child, by teenaged girls forced to work until midnight seven days a week, or in a sweatshop by workers paid 9 an hour? The sad fact is...You cannot. The companies do not want you to know, so they hide their production behind locked factory gates, barbed wire and armed guards. Many multinationals refuse to release to the American people even the list and addresses of the factories they use around the world to make the goods we purchase. The corporations say we have no right to this information. Even the President of th ...
    Related: sweat, sweatshops, american free, minimum wage, accounting
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,717 words
    Carl Sandburg As a child of an immigrant couple, Carl Sandburg was barely American himself, yet the life, which he had lived, has defined key aspects of our great country, and touched the hearts and minds of her people. Sandburg grew up in the American Midwest, yet spent the majority of his life traveling throughout the states. The country, which would define his style of poetry and his views of society, government, and culture, would equally be defined by his writing, lecturing, and the American dream he lived: The dream of becoming successful with only an idea and the will to use it. Historically, Sandburg's most defining poetic element is his free verse style. His open views towards Ameri ...
    Related: carl, carl sandburg, sandburg, puerto rico, american dream
  • Childhood And Treatment Of Children - 752 words
    Childhood And Treatment Of Children Childhood and the Treatment of Children Children all over the world are treated differently at different times, during different centuries. Some children are raised by both of their parents in a good environment, with good conditions, and with a good education. Those kids are well taken care of and are happy if love is added to all that. The place that they live in becomes perfect. There are other kids, though, that have no loving parent, or no parents at all; no beautiful warm home, or no home at all; no healthy food, or no food at all and no good education, or no education at all. They have to work all day just to survive and get a little bit of somethin ...
    Related: joe gargery, george eliot, great expectations, robots, mill
  • Civil War - 3,726 words
    Civil War Before the civil war that tore the fabric of American life, there were three sections of American people with different economic, cultural and political attitudes. The balance of power was kept by different alliances, which came up in the pre-civil war period. The west was the balancing power and it was its shift that decided the course of American history. While it was allied with the south for economic reasons, a delicate balance was maintained. The minute the west allied with the north, the shift resulted in irreconcilable differences and led to war. The boundaries of the sections were very fluid but the basic sections in the 1840s-1860s were the north, which included New Englan ...
    Related: civil war, more important, southern white, american life, minnesota
  • Confucianism, The Philosophical System Based On The Teaching Of Confucius 551479 Bc, Dominated Chinese Sociopolitical Life Fo - 1,161 words
    Confucianism, the philosophical system based on the teaching of Confucius (551-479 BC), dominated Chinese sociopolitical life for most of Chinese history and largely influenced the cultures of Korea, Japan, and Indochina. The Confucian school functioned as a recruiting ground for government positions, which were filled by those scoring highest on examinations in the Confucian classics. It also blended with popular and imported religions and became the vehicle for articulating Chinese mores to the peasants. The school's doctrines supported political authority using the theory of the mandate of Heaven. It sought to help the rulers maintain domestic order, preserve tradition, and uphold a const ...
    Related: chinese, chinese culture, chinese history, chinese people, confucius, philosophical, sociopolitical
  • Corporate Politics And Responsibilities - 1,919 words
    ... left. Bibliography  Corporate Responsibility As we moved into the 1990's companies became aware that social responsibility was essential to their corporate responsibility to make a profit. Companies are now discovering that "high road" practices such as working with unions, and treating the community and environment are often more profitable, and certainly more respectful than old style "low road" practices that companies used to use that often overlook the needs of the unions, community and environment. William Norris, the founder of Control Data Corporation sums it up well when he stated that, "You can't do business in a society that's burning." What he meant was that if your c ...
    Related: corporate, corporate america, corporate responsibility, third force, economic growth
  • Cultural Revolution Ignited - 614 words
    Cultural Revolution Ignited "A cultural revolution ignited" In the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century the country was experiencing a boom time in the economy, but it came at the expense of the average poor immigrant. As long as business men were making a buck they didnt care or who what they exploited in order to do so. Also, there were no limitations on what any industry can and can not do. The United States Government had a laissez-faire policy at the time, and the economy was let be. This proved harmful to the everyday American because they had no protection under the laws in there workplaces. In the novel The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, he exposes the wrongs of our societ ...
    Related: cultural revolution, affirmative action, writing process, the jungle, involving
  • Eleanor Roosevelt - 1,411 words
    Eleanor Roosevelt The Contributions of Eleanor Roosevelt Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 11, 1884. She was one of America's great reforming leaders who had a sustained impact on national policy toward youth, blacks, women, the poor, and the United Nations. As the wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, she was one of the most active First Ladies as well as an important public personality in her own right. When Eleanor Roosevelt traveled to New York City a week after her husband's funeral in April 1945, a host of reporters were waiting at the door of her Washington Square apartment. The story is over, she said simply, assuming that her words and opinions would no ...
    Related: anna eleanor roosevelt, eleanor, eleanor roosevelt, franklin d roosevelt, franklin roosevelt, roosevelt
  • Eric Glave 266 Words - 1,669 words
    Eric Glave 266 Words ECO 2013 "Death of Outrage" By William J. Bennet William J. Bennett, secretary of education and chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities under President Reagan captured the public imagination with the best-selling Book of Virtues, a compendium of other people's writing that had something to teach about morality. In his new book, Bennett advances his own credo of right and wrong, and it is far less compelling. It is a slim book with a correspondingly slim premise: that the American public's failure to be outraged at President Clinton's lies about his private life is evidence of our moral and intellectual disarmament. The book has six brief chapters with the gran ...
    Related: eric, hillary clinton, white house, monica lewinsky, excuse
  • Federalism Comparison - 1,257 words
    ... Federal Child Labor Act was deemed unconstitutional because it attempted to impede interstate commerce on grounds that were outside its jurisdiction. The law made it unlawful to transport goods on interstate roads that were made in places that violated the guidelines set by the act. This decision and other dualist aligned decisions clearly evoke the obvious signs that the Justices involved in writing the decisions were strongly influenced by the prospect of an expanding economy. The idea that government control in areas of commerce would impede the economic growth was something that the dualist court could not accept. As such, the court paid more attention to the political/social atmosph ...
    Related: comparison, cooperative federalism, federalism, states rights, labor relations
  • 72 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>