Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: african american

  • 463 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american life
  • African American Community - 3,040 words
    ... stood that his name would not appear in the program credits or advertising. For twenty weeks, the Mahalia Jackson Show ran on television for a half-hour each episode. Beginning in September 1954, the show did not last very long. Mahalias show featured her singing traditional gospels and spirituals with a few miscellaneous songs but the show was missing a major component. (2) The show was in need of a sponsor and began to go out of business. The show went from thirty minutes airtime to ten minutes and eventually ended in February 1955. This was not the end of Mahalia's television appearances however. The TV station, WBBM-TV of Chicago asked Mahalia to be a guest on their program, "In Town ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, race relations
  • African American Culture - 957 words
    African American Culture African American Culture Culture is not a fixed phenomenon, nor is it the same in all places or to all people. It is relative to time, place, and particular people. Learning about other people can help us to understand ourselves and to be better world citizens. One of the most common ways of studying culture is to focus on the differences within and among cultures. Although their specifics may vary form one culture to another, sociologists refer to those elements or characteristics that can be found in every know society as cultural universals. For example, in all societies, funeral rites include expression of grief, disposing of the dead, and rituals that define the ...
    Related: african, african american, african american culture, african art, american, american community, american culture
  • African American Heritage In Chicago - 702 words
    African American Heritage In Chicago A History of African American Heritage in Chicago The massive exodus to the north began in 1915; a population of people weary of pervasive hostility and constraint in their former lives, fleeing a social system comprised of miserable oppression and repeated violence. The primary cities for resettlement became New York and Chicago, metropolises humming with the vigor of big-city life and the excitement of a new beginning. When the Chicago Commission asked African American migrants in interviews on Race Relations in 1922 why they came to Chicago, responses were similar. Im looking for better wages. I wanted to get away from the South, and to earn more money ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american heritage, american population, american youth
  • African American In The Colonial Era - 1,017 words
    African American In The Colonial Era African Americans in the Colonial Era An African American is an American of African descent. In the book African Americans in the Colonial Era, the story is told how this descends came about. When Africans were brought from Africa to the new world to become slaves, many changes occurred in their culture. Among these changes in culture, has emerged a new race: The African American. When slavery began in English North America, nearly all the slaves came from the coast and interior of West and West Central Africa. A few came from the Mozambique coast or Madagascar, around the Cape of Good Hope. In coming to the Americas, these Africans kept religion as the h ...
    Related: african, african american, african american history, african culture, african religions, american, american history
  • African American Women And Music - 1,702 words
    African American Women and Music The purpose of this report was for me to research and explore the connection between African American women and music. Since prior to the slave decades, music has been an integral part of African American society, and served as a form of social, economic, and emotional support in African American communities in the past and present. This paper will cover three different types of secular music that emerged during the slave days, through the civil war, reconstruction, and depression periods. They are blues, jazz, and gospel music. Each of these forms of music are still in existence today. In addition to exploring the history of each of these genres of music, th ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american jazz, american society, american women, black women
  • African American Writers - 910 words
    African American Writers The African- American Community has been blessed with a multitude of scholars. Two of those scholars include Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du bois. Both of these men, had a vision for African- Americans. They wanted to see the advancement of their race of people. These great leaders just had different viewpoints as to how this should be accomplished. Mr. Washingtons viewpoints are based on his own personal experience and understanding of politics. Mr. Du bois viewpoints came from his knowledge of the importance of education and its ability to break down barriers of color. Washington and Du bois wanted to see the advancement of the African-American people. The quest ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american people, american writers
  • American Dream Of African American Soldiers After Wwi - 988 words
    American Dream of African American soldiers after WWI American Dream of African American soldiers after WWI During World War I many things changed, lives were destroyed; dreams shattered, and many soldiers who went to war came back with a different view of life. This "lost generation" was one of the main reasons why the speakeasies and popular 20s culture arose. That culture arose because the men returning from the battlefield did not care. Especially when the African American soldiers returned from WWI. They changed their views also on their American Dream. These soldiers "the lost generation" are what made the 20s. The African American soldiers when upon returning to the United States were ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american dream, american society, american version, dream
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,960 words
    Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940S And Today Comparing the Daily Lives of African American Women in the 1940s and Today For much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in America, Black women were an after-thought in our nation's history. They were the mammies and maids, the cooks and caregivers, the universal shoulder to cry on in times of trouble. Often overlooked and undervalued, Black women were just ... there. African American women have come a long way. In the 1940s, women were treated as second-class citizens and Blacks faced discrimination everywhere they looked. They were not taught to be proud of being Black (Dressier, 1985). They had a hard time go ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american women, black women, comparing, daily life
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,840 words
    ... acy arises in a racially conscious society where Black women and Black men are still struggling with how to present their physical image and still be accepted in the society. It is very complex trying to negotiate your self-acceptance through two opposing cultures. Advertising in the 1930s had an impact on how African Americans defined themselves, particularly African American women. It is still the same more than 60 years later (Brown & Lieberson, 2000). Advertisers have successfully exploited the self-image of Black men and women. To be Black, especially if you were particularly dark, was loaded with negative stereotypes. Several products, promising miraculous transformations, were man ...
    Related: african, african american, afro american, american, american history, american journal, american life
  • Misconceptions Of African American Life - 1,286 words
    Misconceptions Of African American Life "When you control a man's thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his proper place and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary." This quote, spoken true by a prominent African American scholar of the 20th century, Carson Woodson, is aimed at shedding light on the inherent miseducation of African Americans. His beliefs that controlling one's thinking with such a powerful grasp that allows little or no movemen ...
    Related: african, african american, african american history, american, american community, american history, american life
  • Misconceptions Of African American Life - 1,267 words
    ... till fresh in the minds of most Americans - the depression ridden early 1940s - an African American gentleman named Gordon Parks set out to use his camera as a way to expose the evils of racism, the evils of poverty, the discrimination and the bigotry, "by showing the people who suffered most under it. Although he had experienced racial discrimination outside the South, it was in the southern city of Washington, D.C., that Parks found out what prejudice was really like. In 1942, an opportunity to work for the Farm Security Administration brought Gordon to the United States Capitol on a fellowship for the study of the south deemed " a fund set up for exceptionally able spooks and white cr ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american artists, american flag, american history, american life
  • Nikki Yolande Cornelia Giovanni Has Made An Enormous Impact On African American Literature She Uses Her Own Experiences To Wr - 836 words
    Nikki (Yolande Cornelia) Giovanni has made an enormous impact on African American literature. She uses her own experiences to write wonderful poetry. In the poem Nikki-Rosa, Nikki Giovanni writes the opposite about her growing up in her family. When I first read this poem, I pictured a poverty-stricken family living in a small apartment, much like the Younger family in A Raisin in the Sun. Evidently, the family is poor because they have no inside toilet and take baths in one of those/ big tubs that folk in chicago barbecue in (10-11). The family is not as concerned about poverty as they are for their love for one another, And though you're poor it isn't poverty that concerns you and though t ...
    Related: african, african american, african american literature, american, american literature, black experience, enormous
  • Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Was The First Important African American Poet In American Literature And The First Poet To Write Of Bot - 950 words
    Paul Lawrence Dunbar, was the first important African American Poet in American Literature and the first poet to write of both a black and white audience in a time when efforts were being made to re-establish slavery. He was also "the first African-American poet to garner national critical acclaim"(43). During his short lifetime Dunbar became known as the "poet laureate of African Americans" (Columbus 45). Paul Lawrence Dunbar was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1872, to two freed slaves. Both of Dunbar's parents, who had been born slaves, had a love for literature. His father Joshua, had escaped slavery, moved to Canada, and returned to fight in the Civil War. It was after the war that he met and m ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american literature, lawrence, literature, poet
  • Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Was The First Important African American Poet In American Literature And The First Poet To Write Of Bot - 1,045 words
    ... 37). The ideas in this era pertaining to literature was that the visualization was just as important as the content. Scientific improvement in the industrial world inspired devotion to new artistry techniques. Imagination and perspective became a fundamental aspect of the modernist technique as well. It was no longer adequate to write a basic third-person narrative or use an interfering narrator. How the poem was told became as significant as the poetry itself. To analyze such modernist novels and poetry, a school of new criticism arose in the United States, with a new critical vocabulary. New critics hunted the epiphany (moment in which a character suddenly sees the transcendent truth o ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american life, american literature, lawrence, literature
  • Reparations And African American Slaves - 1,019 words
    Reparations And African American Slaves If the United States government were to support the reparations to the descendents of African American slaves it would be an admitting of their responsibility. This is an issue that the United States government does not want to bring back to the forefront. To them, slavery is an occurrence in history such as the Vietnam War, which is not easy to tell about without editing. What is done is done, and bringing up possibilities of any type of reparation would stir up a negative outlook on government, even if trying to make amends. Currently, it would be less likely for the U.S. government to take any action on the issue of slavery. Besides funding reasons, ...
    Related: african, african american, american, german government, racial discrimination
  • 100 Years Of Degradation - 1,060 words
    100 Years Of Degradation Students were assigned this essay as an inside look at oppression and racism from the last one hundred years, told by two elderly ladies in the book, Having Our Say. 100 Years of Degradation There are several books that have to be read in English 095. Having Our Say is one of them. My advice is to read this book while you are still in 090 or 094, just to get the advantage. These are some things that you will discover in this extraordinary biography. This book is tough to take as humorous, because its heart-wrenching to look at racism in America, but Having Our Say, manages to pull off the feat. Having Our Say really makes you think and tries to somehow reflect on the ...
    Related: degradation, public school system, rights movement, school teacher, negro
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • 65279 The Life And Works Of James Weldon Johnson - 1,420 words
    THE LIFE AND WORKS OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON James Weldon Johnson was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor,who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much abouthis contributions to African American literature. Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise (Dallied) Johnson. Johnsons father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. He was a headwaiter in St. James Hotel. Mr. Johnson taughthis son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnsons mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was awoman of French an ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, weldon, weldon johnson, works cited
  • A Raisin In The Sun Theme - 816 words
    A Raisin In The Sun - Theme *INTRO* A dream may not necessarily be just a dream. With ambition and determination, it can come true in time. Lorraine Hansberry illustrates this theme of achieving success in her play A Raisin in the Sun. The play is about the problems that the economically impoverished African American Younger family faces in trying to make their dreams come true, and the means by which they finally see some light at the end of the tunnel. Lena is Walter and Beneathas mother. Walter is married to Ruth and has a son whose name is Travis. Lorraine Hansberry shows how Lenas dream of having a house in a good neighborhood finally comes true in spite of the multitude of difficulties ...
    Related: a raisin in the sun, raisin, raisin in the sun, fall apart, right thing
  • 463 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>