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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: characterized

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  • Lyme Disease Lyme Arthritis Lyme Disease Is A Ticktransmitted Inflammatory Disorder Characterized By An Early Focal Skin Lesi - 1,265 words
    Lyme Disease Lyme Arthritis ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted inflammatory disorder characterized by an early focal skin lesion, and subsequently a growing red area on the skin (erythema chronicum migrans or ECM). The disorder may be followed weeks later by neurological, heart or joint abnormalities. Symptomatology ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The first symptom of Lyme disease is a skin lesion. Known as erythema chronicum migrans, or ECM, this usually begins as a red discoloration (macule) or as an elevated round spot (papule). The skin lesion usually appears on an extremity or on the trunk, especially the thigh, buttock or the under arm. This spot expands, often with central clearing, to ...
    Related: arthritis, characterized, disorder, focal, inflammatory, lyme, rheumatoid arthritis
  • The Common View Of Hypnosis Is That It Is An Altered State Of Consciousness, A Trancelike State Characterized By Intense Conc - 773 words
    The common view of hypnosis is that it is an altered state of consciousness, a trance-like state characterized by intense concentration, extreme relaxation, and high suggestibility. Many who accept this view also believe that hypnosis is the way of accessing the unconscious mind, thereby allowing the recovery of repressed memories, multiple personalities, and even memories of past lives. Since at least the 1960's this view of hypnosis has been seen as a myth by scientifically-minded psychologists, who deny that hypnosis is an altered state which somehow allows the hypnotist to communicate directly with the unconscious mind. There are two distinct, though related, aspects to the mythical view ...
    Related: characterized, hypnosis, intense, good time, unconscious mind
  • The Jackson Age Is Characterized By The Rise Of The Common Man Through - 347 words
    The Jackson Age is characterized by the rise of the common man. Through hard work and perseverance one can achieve success and the American Dream. The combination of the Protestant work ethic, ambition, and a little spunk was what personified the Jacksonian Age. With the common man came the acceptance and admiration of traits such as boldness, frankness, and brashness. These ideals of the Jacksonian era are embodied best in Winfield Scott through both his successful career and his outspoken manner. Winfield Scott was born in 1786 in Virginia and attended some school. However, he recieved his real education from actual experience working with a law firm. The Jacksonian Age also encouraged pra ...
    Related: characterized, jackson, american dream, practical, fulfillment
  • 17th Century Poetry - 543 words
    17Th Century Poetry The seventeenth century was a time of difficult changes and uncertainties. During these chaotic years many poets and philosophers expressed their thoughts and emotions through literature. This paper will briefly describe the seventeenth century and will include quotes and philosophies of poets such as John Donne, John Milton and Richard Lovelace. Life in the seventeenth century can be described as violent. After Queen Elizabeths death, James I, her successor created disorder when he wanted everyone to be Anglican. This soon led to the beheading of his successor, King Charles I. Throughout this century England saw many different rulers and seven civil wars. During the last ...
    Related: century england, century poetry, poetry, seventeenth century, civil wars
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,262 words
    ... n with us. Animal Farm basically deals with how seeking totalitarian power can and will destroy any attempt at revolution and how power can corrupt even the most probable utopias. One night when Farmer Jones has gone to bed drunk, Old Major, the pig in charge of all, assembles all of the animals of Manor Farm to tell them of a dream he had concerning man's and animal's place in life. He points out how animals are literally worked to death by man, who consumes but does not produce, and thus must remove man by means of rebellion. Shortly thereafter, he dies and the animals begin preparation for this Revolution, whenever it may come. When the hungry animals attack and drive off Jones one da ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, manor farm, encarta encyclopedia
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • The Question Of Being: What It Is, Why It Matters - 1,317 words
    "The Question Of Being": What It Is, Why It Matters. Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the "question of Being" by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand Being because Dasein is a kind of being that is concerned about its very Being. Contrary to the popular opinion that in order to truly and clearly comprehend any phenomenon, the subject which interrogates must necessarily stand ...
    Related: thomas aquinas, martin heidegger, true meaning, reflective, disclosure
  • Thousand Cranes By Yasunari Kawabata - 1,659 words
    "Thousand Cranes" by Yasunari Kawabata ILLUSTRATE THE ROLE WHICH MRS OTA AND HER DAUGHTER FUMIKO PLAY IN BRINGING ABOUT THE REFORMATION OF KIKUJI'S CHARACTER TO COME TO TERMS WITH HIS PAST. IN WHAT WAYS (IF ANY) DOES THIS HELP HIM BECOME A BETTER PERSON? Kawabata's "Thousand Cranes" is a novel that puts little emphasis on story lines, placing more value on emotions, reflections, symbolism and such. The rather crude (at first sight) plot of this complicated piece of Japanese literature is concentrated on a tangled web of relationships of the past, riddled with jealousy, insecurity and deep mistrust. Kikuji Mitani, the main character, has grown up watching many of these triangular and adultero ...
    Related: first impressions, the girl, main character, insecurity, secure
  • Towards Innovation - 1,518 words
    "Towards Innovation" The world today is experiencing the most rapid pace of change in its history. The purpose of this essay is to discuss what organizational structure is suitable in the business circumstances of today. This essay will argue that 'the environment of the 21st century is such, that to be effective, organizations are tending towards less formalized structures than used in the past'. To support this argument, firstly organizations will be defined, and then the properties that make an organization effective will be identified. Next organizational structure will be appraised, and what constitutes business environment will be established. Finally the influences globalisation and t ...
    Related: innovation, information exchange, work activities, business environment, workforce
  • A Birth Of A Nation The Bicycle Thieves - 1,300 words
    A Birth Of A Nation - The Bicycle Thieves In that paper, I will try to compare two films which are A Birth of a Nation directed by D.W.Griffith and The Bicycle Thieves directed by De Sica. After giving the story of the films, I will try to explain their technical features and their similarities. A Birth of a Nation by D. W. Griffith Griffith can be seen as the first 'modern' director, his greatest achievements being the historical epics The Birth Of A Nation. When it was released, it was one of the longest films ever made, over three hours in length. The prologue depicts the introduction of slavery to America in the seventeenth century and the beginnings of the abolitionist movement. The maj ...
    Related: bicycle, thieves, civil rights, ku klux klan, sequence
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,339 words
    A Reaction To Uncle Tom's Cabin Lauren Richmond History 201 April 1, 1999 A Reaction to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin "So this is the little lady who made this big war." Abraham Lincoln's legendary comment upon meeting Harriet Beecher Stowe demonstrates the significant place her novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, holds in American history. Published in book form in 1852, the novel quickly became a national bestseller and stirred up strong emotions in both the North and South. The context in which Uncle Tom's Cabin was written, therefore, is just as significant as the actual content. Among other things, Stowe's publication of her novel was stimulated by the increasing tensions among the na ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • A World Of Diversity - 614 words
    A World of Diversity Ethnocentric, derived from the Greek words of Ethnos, meaning race, people or cultural group, and Kentrikos, meaning concentrated about or directed to a center is a word that greatly describes many cultures on this planet we call Earth . The official definition of Ethnocentric is " characterized or based on the attitude that ones own group is superior" or "having race as a central interest". There is a whole world of problems, politics, and, other cultures, but it seems that the average Americans only interest is that of themselves. The reason I chose to focus more on the American being ethnocentric is because I have been exposed the most to this culture. Why is it that ...
    Related: diversity, world politics, world view, foreign countries, simon fraser university
  • Abortion - 974 words
    Abortion Abortion is one of the most controversial issues discussed in todays society. This issue has caused a great deal of turmoil in the world. Some protestors have even killed other human beings over the issue. Peoples religion has had some input on this issue, but this should not be the only factor when looking at this serious controversial debate. There are many questions that one must ask him or herself when deciding to be either for or against abortion. In this position paper I am going to talk about some issues that may not be black and white. My position on this issue is against abortion, and I am going to attempt to show that. Abortion is wrong in many instances. It is wrong anyti ...
    Related: abortion, birth control, human beings, self awareness, sperm
  • Absolute Poverty - 1,934 words
    Absolute Poverty Peter Singers characterization of absolute poverty is defined by using the criteria given by World Bank President, Robert McNamara. McNamara states that absolute poverty is, a condition of life so characterized by malnutrition, illiteracy, disease, squalid surroundings, high infant mortality and low life expectancy as to beneath any reasonable definition of human decency. This form of poverty affects human life on all levels of existence. A comparison is given between the relative poverty of industrialized nations versus the absolute poverty of developing nations. Relative poverty means that some citizens are poor, relative to the wealth enjoyed by their neighbors. Absolute ...
    Related: absolute, absolute poverty, poverty, relative poverty, save lives
  • Adolescence - 667 words
    Adolescence Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary (1980) defines adolescence as the state or process of growing up; even more specifically, adolescence is also defined as the period of life from puberty to maturity terminating legally at the age of majority. Looking back on their adolescence, adults often conjure up grand memories, and laugh at their mistakes. Adolescence is a period in life that everyone must 'survive' in order to become an adult, although some go through it more turbulently than others. Falling approximately between the ages of 12 and 20, adolescence is characterized by physical changes leading to sexual maturity (Encyclopedia.com). Along with these obvious physical changes, ...
    Related: adolescence, collegiate dictionary, parental guidance, criminal behavior, encyclopedia
  • Adolescent Sexuality - 1,525 words
    Adolescent Sexuality Adolescent Sexuality Sexuality is an important aspect of development during adolescence. The ability to identify and communicate with adolescent who may be at high risk of premature activity is important since sexual intercourse at an early age can have serious short and long-term consequences. An emphasis of confidentiality and an honest appraisal of implications of early sexual activity will enhance discussions about sexual issues with adolescents. Some parents are ill prepared for discussions about sexuality. Having conversations with their adolescent on sexuality may be difficult for them. Many adolescents claim both experience and confidence about sexual issues, the ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent boys, adolescent girls, human sexuality, sexuality
  • Advertising Influence On Culture - 660 words
    Advertising Influence On Culture Effects of advertising Advertising promotes more than mere products in our popular culture. Because images used in advertising are often idealized, they eventually set the standard which we in turn feel we must live up to. Advertisements serve to show us what the ideal image is, and further tell us how to obtain it. Advertisers essentially have the power to promote positive images or negative images. Unfortunately, most of the roles portrayed by women tend to fit the latter description. The irony lies therein since it is these negative images which have been most successful in selling products. It is easy to understand the appeal which these ads hold for men, ...
    Related: advertising, consumer culture, popular culture, self esteem, body image
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