Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cessation

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  • Abortion - 714 words
    Abortion annon Abortion on demand should be legal for many reasons. In countries where abortion is absolutely not tolerated it is a fact that women continue to receive abortions, from unqualified back-street abortionists or the village massage abortionist. Both of these individuals risk putting the woman through painful and potentially fatal tortures just in an attempt to abort a child. Each year 84 000 women die worldwide from failed abortion attempts. Because of anti-abortion legislation women avoid going to the hospital, often until it is too late, to avoid prosecution from police. In the cases of rape and incest the very idea of being forced to have the child of the woman's abuser is rep ...
    Related: abortion, medical profession, catholic church, religious women, cessation
  • Afterlife - 1,117 words
    Afterlife There was a woman who had been diagnosed with cancer and had been given three months to live. Her Dr. told her to start making preparations to die (something we all should be doing all of the time.) So she contacted her pastor and had him come to her house to discuss certain aspects of her final wishes. She told him which songs she wanted sung at the service, what scriptures she would like read, and what she wanted to be wearing. The woman also told her pastor that she wanted to be buried with her favorite bible. Everything was in order and the pastor was preparing to leave when the woman suddenly remembered something very important to her. "There's one more thing," she said excite ...
    Related: afterlife, c. s. lewis, life after death, bible says, buried
  • Alcoholismnature Or Nuture - 1,570 words
    ... havior. Experiments have shown those males exhibit higher levels of aggression than do females. The aggressive behavior starts in the adolescent stages of life and may continue into adulthood. Where does the aggressiveness originate? Part of the explanation is that children who are sociable and spontaneous exhibit more aggressive behavior than those who do not. Surprisingly, common traits amongst these children are being first born, having a stable family life and a shy temperament. More current, up to date explanation state that aggression is learned response to frustration and by observing others who exhibit the same aggressive behavior. Males also are at greater risk for developing cr ...
    Related: environmental factors, drug abuse, sexual abuse, sitting, dependence
  • An Estimated 146,000 Americans Died Of Lung Cancer In 1992, And 90 Percent Of These Deaths Were Caused By Cigarette Smoking S - 421 words
    An estimated 146,000 Americans died of lung cancer in 1992, and 90 percent of these deaths were caused by cigarette smoking. Smoking is responsible for about 30 percent of all cancer deaths annually in the United States more than 155,000 each year. If smoking-related cancers could be eliminated from our society, we would see a significant decline in the annual cancer death rate instead of small but steady increases. Since 1964, the year of the Surgeon General's first report on the health risks of cigarette smoking, strong evidence of the association between smoking and cancer has accumulated. Countless studies have proved that smoking causes lung cancer, and we now know that it substantially ...
    Related: cancer, cigarette, cigarette smoking, lung, lung cancer, quit smoking, smoking
  • Ancestor Worship - 1,174 words
    Ancestor Worship 4. Compare and contrast Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. How are they similar? How are they different? 5. Describe the Chinese tradition of ancestor worship. -Question 4. Buddhism Has over 300 million members, and was founded around 2, 500 years ago in India. The founder is Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, or referred to as the Enlightened One. Their major scripture are The Triptaka, Anguttara-Nikaya, Dhammapada, Sutta-Nipata, Samyutta-Nikaya and many others. Buddhism today is divided into three main sects: Theravada, or Hinayana (Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia), Mahayana (China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea), and Vajrayana (Tibet, Mongolia and Japan). Their Life goal is Ni ...
    Related: ancestor worship, worship, everyday life, famous people, hunting
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,132 words
    Anorexia Nervosa A normal female takes a stroll down the streets of Manhattan and ends up at Times Square, probably one of the most colorful places on earth, which also has an abundant number of advertisements. As this female looks up at the pictures, she can see a Calvin Klein ad. The image portrays people who are the idols of our youth; young, thin, beautiful men and women. These young people depict the"ideal" body. As this female walks, she begins to notice her own physical attributes and wonders what it would take for her to look like that Calvin Klein model. Despite the fact that the greatest majority of us could never attain these physiques, many, especially young women, deeply desire ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, mental health, middle class
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,248 words
    Applied Nostalgia Applied Nostalgia--A Parental Look Back Without past memories, Americans lack a standard to base present conditions upon. These memories lie carefully shuffled and categorized in the giant shifter called the brain to crudely approximate the present standard of life. They hope to draw gratification and fulfillment in the progression of the quality of their and especially their children's lives. This innate desire to compare the past to the present drives personal and political decisions, especially conservatives who advocate a change to the policies and values of the past. Today, the faded memories of an emerging group of parents of their post-World War II upbringing, like c ...
    Related: last year, equal rights, world war ii, prepare, california
  • Ascertain Cause, Manner, And Time Of Death - 776 words
    Ascertain Cause, Manner, And Time Of Death Ascertain cause, Manner, and Time of Death The Presumptive Sings of Death include cessation of respiration, cessation of heartbeat, changes in the eyes, and cooling of the body. Positive signs of death indicate that death has occurred. This includes postmortem lividity, postmortem rigidity, instantaneous rigor, postmortem decomposition, and insect invasion. All of these signs of death can help you determine time, cause, and manor of death. Cessation of respiration is the apparent lack of breathing. In certain types of death like electrocution and drowning, the victim may not be breathing but life may still exist. To determine if breathing is occurri ...
    Related: ascertain, environmental factors, american history, cool, mouth
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,648 words
    Assisted Suicide Assisted Suicide: Ethical or Immoral? Assisted Suicide, also known as mercy killing, occurs when a physician provides the means (drugs or other agents) by which a person can take his or her own life. This assistance is one of the most debated issues today in society followed by abortion. Physicians are frequently faced with the question of whether or not assisted suicide is ethical or immoral. Although assisted suicide is currently illegal in almost all states in America, it is still often committed. Is assisted suicide ethical? Studies have found that the majority of Americans support assisted suicide. One must weigh both sides of the argument before they can decide. On Jul ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Evaluation - 1,967 words
    Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Evaluation Integrated into the story of The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath is a "case history" of a depression patient, from it's subtle beginnings to it's terrifying consequences to it's shaky resolution. On the subject of this depression, there is an article written by William Styron which, in the course of describing his own dealings with the disease, he compares it to cancer. It is my own firm opinion that this assertion is perfectly valid, and it can be shown through careful analysis of the causes and effects of both depression and cancer that this is so. In addition, using The Bell Jar as an example of a case of depression, we will see how this comparison makes clear ...
    Related: bell, bell jar, evaluation, plath, sylvia, sylvia plath, the bell jar
  • Buddhism - 1,227 words
    Buddhism Buddhism According to Webster's definition, Buddhism is not a religion. It states that religion is the belief in or worship of God or gods(Webster's New World Dictionary pg.505). The Buddha was not a god(About Buddhism pg.1). There is no theology, no worship of a deity or deification of the Buddha(Butter pg.1) in Buddhism. Therefore Buddhists don't pray to a creator god(Buddhism FAQ's pg.1). Consequently, Buddhism is catagorized as a philosophy, but is still regarded it as a religion. The name Buddhism comes from the word 'budhi' which means to wake up and thus Buddhism is the philosophy of awakening(What is Buddhism pg.1). Fittingly, buddha literally means 'awakened one'( Buddhist ...
    Related: buddhism, northern india, noble eightfold path, second noble truth, awakening
  • Buddhism - 1,057 words
    Buddhism Dukkha is the first of the four noble truths of Buddhism. The word means suffering, but just to state suffering as the entirety of the first noble truth, is not enough because the expression of dukkha is the first truth that is needed for salvation. Moreover, dukkha is the conclusion of a logical chain of ideas that explains the life and death cycle of mankind. Before a person recognizes the truth of dukkha, he lives in a space of ignorance and with ignorance he seeks the fulfillment of his desires, yet with every demand met, he soon finds dissatisfaction. The longer a person lives the more apparent the truth of demise. With birth comes pain; with living comes pain and suffering. In ...
    Related: buddhism, life cycle, fold path, second noble truth, grief
  • Buddhism - 1,161 words
    ... rtha revealed that he had become the Buddha, and described the pleasure that he had first known as a prince, and the life of severe asceticism that he had practiced. Neither of these was the true path to Nirvana. The true path was the Middle Way, which keeps aloof from both extremes. "To satisfy the necessities of life is not evil," the Buddha said. "To keep the body in good health is a duty, for otherwise we shall not be able to trim the lamp of wisdom and keep our mind strong and clear." Buddha then taught them the Dharma, which consisted of the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path. The five holy men and others soon joined Buddha, accompanying him everywhere. As more joined, Buddha ...
    Related: buddhism, york macmillan, central asia, good health, strict
  • Buddhism - 1,651 words
    Buddhism In Life there is suffering. This spurs on the unending search for universal truth and meaning. Jodo Shinsu is an answer to this search. The "practice" of Jodo Shinshu is the recitation of the Nembutsu with self-reflection. It involves hearing the call of Amida Buddha, the Buddha of Eternal Life and Infinite Light, Compassion and Wisdom, within others' or ours recitation of the Name. Which calls us to raise our spiritual perspectives beyond immediate ego interests to universal concerns for compassion, justice in the human community and concern for the life of nature. The hole of life is Nembutsu. A life lived in awareness, that we ourselves are the expressions, the manifestations, of ...
    Related: buddhism, human beings, right view, practical guide, enlightened
  • Buddhism - 1,086 words
    Buddhism BUDDHISM INTRODUCTION There are four noble truths upon which all Buddhist teaching is based. It is said that if you do not understand these truths it is impossible for you to practice Buddhism. Buddhism, like most other religions has the potential to serve the community and produce good well-natured people. To be a successful Buddhist you must understand the interdependent nature of reality. All of Buddhist Philosophy rests on this one basic truth. In addition to this, you must also practice non-violence, this is at the very least refraining from harming others, but more specifically it means that you should do your best to help other people. When you decide to become Buddhist, you ...
    Related: buddhism, zen buddhism, siddhartha gautama, grove press, korea
  • Causes Of The Korean War - 1,355 words
    Causes Of The Korean War Causes of the Korean War Andrew Glass Global Studies Period Seven The Korean War, 1950-1953 After the USSR installed a Communist government in North Korea in September 1948, that government promoted and supported an insurgency in South Korea in an attempt to bring down the recognized government and gain jurisdiction over the entire Korean peninsula. Not quite two years later, after the insurgency showed signs of failing, the northern government undertook a direct attack, sending the North Korea People's Army south across the 38th parallel before daylight on Sunday, June 25, 1950. The invasion, in a narrow sense, marked the beginning of a civil war between peoples of ...
    Related: korean, korean conflict, korean peninsula, korean war, north korean, south korean
  • Countering Terrorism - 1,642 words
    Countering Terrorism Countering Terrorism There are currently more than 1500 terrorist organizations and groups being monitored in the United States. Terrorists by definition kill people and destroy property in order to advance a political agenda. We must make every effort to protect American citizens from these attacks. In the future that will require both state of the art measures to monitor terrorist activities and the movement of materials used for these activities, but also response scenarios in the event of an actual incident. The United States has consistently set a good example of no negotiations with terrorists and attempting to bring alleged terrorists to trial. We need to support ...
    Related: counter terrorism, countering, terrorism, soviet military, health organization
  • Dickinsons Poem Because I Could Not Stop For Death - 938 words
    Dickinson's Poem Because I Could Not Stop For Death Thantos, Charon, Death. No matter what we call it, the idea that is death is always with us. It causes great pain, but also inspires. Dickinson's poem Because I Could Not Stop for Death is, obviously enough, about death. But rather than being sad about it, she wants the reader to view death as being an inevitable change, rather than an end to existence. By personifying death, she makes it seem relaxing and serene. She also adds to this effect by using vivid imagery and metaphors, as well as rhythm, to create a poem that plays out in the reader's mind like a movie, due also in part to the dramatic imagery. One of the major parts of this poem ...
    Related: because i could not stop for death, poem, common theme, forgetting, conception
  • Dominicans In America - 1,484 words
    ... , a smoking cessation workshop and a Reike (healing method using hands) open house. There is also an exhibit space where women can display their paintings and pottery (Ruiz, p.53). Even though Dominican-Americans are making strides in trying to better their life, there are still many negative stereotypes that persist about them. Once such stereotype that seems to plague all people of color, is that their men are lazy and will not account for their children. Another being that Dominican-American women do not want to work, but only care to get money from the government with no efforts to better themselves. The most silly of these stereotypes is that Dominican-Americans refuse to learn to s ...
    Related: america, dominican republic, anchor press, world wide web, latin
  • Eating Disorders - 1,335 words
    ... y risk their lives. There is no guarantee that after surgery the fat won't come back (Guerra 112). There is no way of knowing how one's body is going to heal after cosmetic surgery, and the surgery often ends in disappointment, depression, or even more cosmetic surgery to fix the scars and unexpected flaws that the first surgery has left. Swelling can also occur for up to six weeks. The possibility of bleeding, bruising, infection and scarring are also some of the risks of liposuction (Ashton 121). Infections, wound disruptions, and erosion of overlying skin are a routine byproduct of any operation. Scar tissue can harden and darken. There is no way to prevent this kind of disfigurement ...
    Related: disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, york routledge, support groups
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