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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cerebral cortex

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  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,261 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease We are currently living in the age of technology. Our advancements in the past few decades overshadow everything learned in the last 2000 years. With the elimination of many diseases through effective cures and treatments, humans can expect to live a much longer life then that of their grandparents. The population of the United States continues to rise, and with the baby boom era coming of age, the number of elderly people is rising as well. This increase has brought with it a large increase in diseases associated with old age. Alzheimer's dementia is one of the most common and feared diseases afflicting the elderly community. Alzheimers disease, once th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, different types, psychoactive drugs
  • Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of - 960 words
    Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of Alzheimers disease : Neurobiology, causes and treatments of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common of the dementing illnesses. A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. A person with Alzhiemers Disease may experience personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, confusion and difficulty finishing thoughts, following directions or even finding the right word to say in a conversation. Once advanced the sufferer may require a caretaker as daily chores become very difficult to accomplish. Evidence points toward amyloid as one of the main causes for the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, diagnosis treatment, main causes, nitric oxide
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive And Irreversible Brain Disease That Destroys Mental And Physical Functioning In Human Bei - 725 words
    Alzheimer's Disease is a progressive and irreversible brain disease that destroys mental and physical functioning in human beings, and invariably leads to death. It is the fourth leading cause of adult death in the United States. Alzheimer's creates emotional and financial catastrophe for many American families every year. Fortunately, a large amount of progress is being made to combat Alzheimer's disease every year. To fully be able to comprehend and combat Alzheimer's disease, one must know what it does to the brain, the part of the human body it most greatly affects. Many Alzheimer's disease sufferers had their brains examined. A large number of differences were present when comparing the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, brain, functioning, human beings, human body, parkinson's disease
  • Alzheimers Qa - 932 words
    Alzheimer's Q&A Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Assoc. Inc. 70 E. Lake Street, Suite 600 Chicago, Illinois 60601 What is Alzheimer's Disease? The most common form of dementing illness, Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. The person with AD may experience confusion, personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, and difficulty finding words, finishing thoughts or following directions. It eventually leaves its victims incapable of caring for themselves. What happens to the brain in Alzheimer's Disease? The nerve cells in the part of the brain that controls memory, thinking, are d ...
    Related: chicago illinois, aging process, men and women, nerve, tissue
  • Catching Dreams - 746 words
    Catching Dreams Dreams are a window into the mind. These may be our most elaborate, distinctive, revealing, and flamboyant creations; they have fascinated us for thousands of years. The Egyptians built temples for dreaming. The oracles of Greece pondered cryptic dreams as the "royal road to the unconscious." Dreams allow us to view beyond that which we are and know in daily life; they hint of other dimensions of space and time. What do dreams really mean? Are they mirrors of your days, tunnels into pauses of the unconscious, or no more than the chance results of biological changes in the brain? No one knows the complete answer yet, but dream researchers are learning more and more about the r ...
    Related: catching, dream interpretation, dreams, waking life, cerebral cortex
  • Dementiaa - 4,130 words
    Dementiaa IntrodWhat is Dementia ?uction Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimers disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntingtons disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimers type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology). The clinical picture in dementia is very similar to delirium, except for the course. Delirium ...
    Related: thyroid disease, higher level, alzheimers disease, staining, remaining
  • Dementiaa - 3,961 words
    ... re senile plaques (SP) and Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). There are two types of SP, neuritic and diffuse, both plaques share antigenic determinants with the Beta amyloid 4 protein. Neuritic plaques can be distinguished by their abnormally thickened neurites ( i.e., axons or dendrites) arranged around a central core of amyloid (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). By contrast the diffuse plaques lack the thickened neurites and the amyloid core seen in the neuritic plaques (Mirra & Gearing, 1994). Plaques of both types are found in varying degrees in the neocortex, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and in the amygdala. SP also occur in the brains of healthy people. It is only when they exceed a certain ...
    Related: cerebral cortex, nervous system, carbon dioxide, 1984, diagnosis
  • Dyslexia - 623 words
    Dyslexia annon The problem that effects one out of every ten kidsin the United States of America is dyslexia. Although to some people this disorder may be very noticeable, it can really sneak up on you. Most of the time kids with dyslexia aren't recognized until they are about eight or nine. The most important thing to remember is that is takes time to solve, and sometimes cannot be cured at all. Dyslexia develops during the first six months of gestation . Neurons are churned out in the brain's ventricular zone. Attached to fibers, the neurons travel to the cerebral cortex, which contains the language centers. Here they hit a barrier, stop and take their place in layers above previously depo ...
    Related: dyslexia, theory of relativity, school level, united states of america, albert
  • Epilepsy - 855 words
    Epilepsy Epilepsy - The Silent Stalker By Steven Voskanian What is Epilepsy? Epilepsy, also called seizure disorder, chronic brain disorder that briefly interrupts the normal electrical activity of the brain to cause seizures, characterized by a variety of symptoms including uncontrolled movements of the body, disorientation or confusion, sudden fear, or loss of consciousness. Epilepsy may result from a head injury, stroke, brain tumor, lead poisoning, genetic conditions, or severe infections like meningitis or encephalitis. In over 70 percent of cases no cause for epilepsy were identified. About 1 percent of the world population, or over 2 million people, are diagnosed with epilepsy. How th ...
    Related: epilepsy, temporal lobe, young children, medical history, classified
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,207 words
    Human Growth And Development Human Growth and Development 1. abusive relationship: when one partner in a relationship becomes violent or aggressive toward the other. 2. accommodation: according to Piaget, changing existing knowledge based on new knowledge. 3. achievement status: identity status in which adolescents have explored alternative identities and are now secure in their chosen identities. 4. active euthanasia: deliberate ending of someones life. 5. activities of daily living (ADLs): self-care tasks such as eating, bathing, toileting, walking, or dressing. 6. activity: dimension of temperament defined by the tempo and vigor of a childs activity. 7. adaptation level: area where enviro ...
    Related: human growth, human values, life cycle, life sciences, amniocentesis
  • My Girlfriend Called Me From Dallas The Other Day You Have Got To Hear About The Dream I Had Last Night, She Said Since This - 1,190 words
    My girlfriend called me from Dallas the other day. "You have got to hear about the dream I had last night," she said. Since this was not a normal reason to call me, I was more than a bit interested to listen to her. "The dream went like this," she explained. "I came to visit you at college. You showed me around, introduced me to your friends, and showed me a great time. Basically, we never left each others side. I felt so happy. Unfortunately, when I woke up, I realized that it was all a dream, and I felt kind of sad. Youre the psychologist what do you make of this?" she said. "Freud said that dreams are unfulfilled wishes," I said. "I think hes right," she replied. "So do I." Sigmund Freud ...
    Related: dallas, dream, dream interpretation, girlfriend, modern psychology
  • My Girlfriend Called Me From Dallas The Other Day You Have Got To Hear About The Dream I Had Last Night, She Said Since This - 1,190 words
    My girlfriend called me from Dallas the other day. "You have got to hear about the dream I had last night," she said. Since this was not a normal reason to call me, I was more than a bit interested to listen to her. "The dream went like this," she explained. "I came to visit you at college. You showed me around, introduced me to your friends, and showed me a great time. Basically, we never left each others side. I felt so happy. Unfortunately, when I woke up, I realized that it was all a dream, and I felt kind of sad. Youre the psychologist what do you make of this?" she said. "Freud said that dreams are unfulfilled wishes," I said. "I think hes right," she replied. "So do I." Sigmund Freud ...
    Related: dallas, dream, dream interpretation, girlfriend, sigmund freud
  • Narcolepsy - 903 words
    Narcolepsy An article in the Scientific American, by Jerome M. Siegel, focused on a dangerous sleeping disorder called Narcolepsy. A Narcoleptic has Symptoms such as cataplexy, which is the loss of skeletal muscle tone, and always feeling sleepy during daytime hours. The people suffering from this disorder tend to feel as if they hadn't gone to sleep for 48 hours. In addition, they sleep poorly at night. Laughter, embarrassment, sudden anger, social interactions with strangers, and sexual intercourse may trigger a cataplectic attack. A Narcoleptic may even fall asleep at the most dangerous times. For example, driving a car with this untreated disorder puts a person at high risk of an automob ...
    Related: narcolepsy, most dangerous, northwestern university, cerebral cortex, stem
  • Optical Illusions - 1,825 words
    Optical Illusions My research paper is about the anatomy of an optical illusion. Optical Illusions are relevant to aviation in that the main guidance system of most aircraft on most flights is the pilot's eyes. Everyone, including pilots, is susceptible to an optical illusion. The hazards of optical illusions are many considering that at any time during the flight they can cause a healthy and experienced pilot to become confused, delusional and generally disoriented with obvious possible consequences. This is why we must study and be aware of optical illusions so that we may be better prepared should we encounter one at a critical time. To better illustrate the origins of optical illusions I ...
    Related: optical, optical illusions, most effective, massachusetts institute, cruise
  • Ritalin - 1,449 words
    Ritalin Ritalin The Babysitter of the 90's 07/03/2000 Prepared for Nursing 2116 by Tracey Hardin Ritalin (Methylphenidate) is a mild CNS stimulant. In medicine, Ritalin's primary use is treatment of Attention Deficit /Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). The mode of action in humans is not completely understood, but Ritalin presumably activates the arousal system of the brain stem and the cortex to produce its stimulant effect. Recently, the frequency of diagnosis for ADHD has increased dramatically. More children and an increasing number of adults are being diagnosed with ADHD. According to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) (Bailey 1995), prescriptions for Ritalin have increased more than 600% in t ...
    Related: ritalin, cerebral cortex, nervous system, controlled substance, vocabulary
  • The Brain - 1,028 words
    ... FUTURE Today many experiments are being conducted that may be break through's for the future. For instance "brain grafting" is one procedure that may be used in the future. Brain grafting is to transplant a very thin layer of brain skin from one person to another. This would result in control of parkinson's disease and other seizure related diseases. Another radical idea that has already been successfully been tried on rhesus monkey's is, brain transplants. The ethics and legal problems for such a transplant would probably never let this operation be performed on humans. This is because the person would not be the same, would not have the same memories or the same abilities that the host ...
    Related: brain, parkinson's disease, body works, cerebral cortex, attach
  • The Brain - 1,018 words
    The Brain A.M.D.G 27th October 1996 The Brain By Manuel Socarrs In the central nervous system of animals, the brain is a segregated group of nerve cells, or neurones, within the cranium, or skull, in vertebrates, and within the head segment in lower forms of animals. The brain varies in size and complexity from rudimentary ganglia (a group of nerve-cell bodies) in the central nervous systems of primitive worms to the large and complex human brain. As the central control organ of the body, the brain governs the functioning of the body's other organs. Sensory nerve cells feed external and internal information from all parts of the body to the brain. At least four medical subspecialties have a ...
    Related: brain, human brain, cerebral cortex, nervous system, stem
  • The Brain - 989 words
    ... rious afferent and efferent tracts, when correlated with symptoms and signs, enables physicians to localise with considerable accuracy the level and extent of lesions in the nervous system. The other 10 cranial nerves, in descending order of location, are the oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, acoustic, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves. Cerebellum The cerebellum accounts for about 10 percent of the brain's weight and is a centre for co-ordinating automatic (reflex) and voluntary movements of the body. It receives afferent impulses from the spinal cord as well as from various brain-stem nuclei. The cerebellum is connected by fibres, both ...
    Related: brain, temporal lobe, diabetes insipidus, written language, temperature
  • The Human Brain - 1,797 words
    The Human Brain The human being is considered to be the ultimate form of life on the earth. This is not because the human body is strong and agile. Many other animals posses skills much superior to humans and are able to perform feats humans can only dream of. The one thing that distinguishes humans from all of the other organisms on this planet is the brain. The brain is the site that controls the human body. However, unlike in animals, in man, the brain is also the site of the mind. The mind gives humans superiority over other creatures. It provides humans with the ability to reason, to feel and to adapt. Because of this, man has achieved so much, and has also realized that much more is st ...
    Related: brain, human behavior, human beings, human body, human brain
  • The Human Brain - 943 words
    The Human Brain THE HUMAN BRAIN The human body is divided into many different parts called organs. All of the parts are controlled by an organ called the brain, which is located in the head. The brain weighs about 2.75 pounds, and has a whitish-pink appearance. The brain is made up of many cells, and is the control center of the body. The brain flashes messages out to all the other parts of the body. The messages travel in very fine threads called nerves. The nerves and the brain make up a system somewhat like telephone poles carrying wires across the city. This is called the nervous system. The nerves in the body don't just send messages from the brain to the organs, but also send messages ...
    Related: brain, human body, human brain, nervous system, common sense
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