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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: cerebral

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  • Cerebral Palsy - 908 words
    Cerebral Palsy Katherine Dillon Child Psychology Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a term used to describe disorders of movement that result from injury to the brain. It is a problem of muscle coordination. The muscles themselves are not effected but the brain is unable to send the appropriate signals necessary to instruct the muscles when to contract or relax. Cerebral Palsy can be caused by numerous problems occurring in the prenatal period, prematurity, labor and delivery complication in the newborn period due to genetic or chromosomal abnormality to the brain may not develop in the typical way. Some environmental factors such as drugs metabolic problems, and placental dysfunction may also lead to C ...
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  • Cerebral Pasy Vs Muscular Dystrophy - 780 words
    Cerebral Pasy Vs. Muscular Dystrophy Muscular dystrophy is a rare inherited muscle disease in which the muscle fibers are unusually susceptible to damage. The muscles, primarily the voluntary muscles, become progressively weaker. In the late stages of muscular dystrophy, muscle fibers often are replaced by fat and connective tissue. There are several types of muscular dystrophy. The various types of the disease affect more than 50,000 Americans. Many are associated with specific genetic abnormalities.The most common muscular dystrophies appear to be due to a genetic deficiency of the muscle protein dystrophin. These types of the disease are called dystrophinopathies. They include: Duchenne' ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, dystrophy, muscular, muscular dystrophy
  • Tommy Is An Eighteen Yearold Male Who Was Born With Cerebral Palsy And Mild Mental Retardation He Is Diagnosed As Right Hemip - 434 words
    Tommy is an eighteen year-old male who was born with Cerebral Palsy and Mild Mental Retardation. He is diagnosed as right - hemiparetic which effects his right leg, arm and hand. Tommy is ambulatory, however, his gait is short and uneven which manifests in a noticeable limp and the dragging of his right leg. He has trouble lifting over ten pounds and walking up stairs but can sit, stand and bend without pain for long periods of time. Tommy is a full-time student at the Hungerford school where he will remain until he is twenty-one. Tommy says he really enjoys school and most subjects, however, he does not enjoy reading and writing. He tells me that those are his weak areas but that he really ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, diagnosed, eighteen, mental retardation, mild, palsy
  • A Boy Of Scotchirish Descent, Whose Ancestors Had Settled In Pennsylvania Before Travelling Through Mountains To Resettle In - 530 words
    A boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose ancestors had settled in Pennsylvania before travelling through mountains to resettle in southern territory, he was born in 1782 in the Abbeville district of South Carolina on March 18. His family was not rich, nor were they poor; they owned slaves and were regarded not as a part of the ostentation associated with slave-holding at the time but rather as a simple, farm family. His father had an interest in politics and participated locally, something that ultimately catapulted this boy into his future profession. Sent at the age of 12 to live with a Presbyterian minister for a basic education, he was eventually trained at Yale beginning his junior year and ...
    Related: ancestors, mountains, pennsylvania, travelling, fundamental principles
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • Alternative Education - 612 words
    Alternative Education Alternative education caters to multifarious groups of students or unprofessional classified according to their needs and circumstances in life. Alternative education programs were designed because of pressures from concerned parents, teachers, students and government officials to ameliorate substandard education and dangerous environment in most public schools. Seeing its benefits, educators and educational institutions broaden the scope of this alternative to promote education and extend it to working adults to further their training and professionalism. Its main goal is to provide opportunities for millions of students, achievers or not, across the United States to m ...
    Related: alternative education, education programs, home schooling, safe schools, esteem
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,261 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease We are currently living in the age of technology. Our advancements in the past few decades overshadow everything learned in the last 2000 years. With the elimination of many diseases through effective cures and treatments, humans can expect to live a much longer life then that of their grandparents. The population of the United States continues to rise, and with the baby boom era coming of age, the number of elderly people is rising as well. This increase has brought with it a large increase in diseases associated with old age. Alzheimer's dementia is one of the most common and feared diseases afflicting the elderly community. Alzheimers disease, once th ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, different types, psychoactive drugs
  • Alzheimers Disease - 1,539 words
    Alzheimer`s Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that affects the brain. Individuals with AD experience a progressive and specific loss of cognitive function resulting from the differentiation of the limbic system, association neocortex, and basal forebrain. It is also accompanied by the deposition of amyloid in plaques and cerebrovasculature, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Alois Alzheimer, a German doctor, diagnosed this disease for the first time in 1907. At that time it was considered a rare disorder. Currently, this tragic brain disorder affects approximately four million people; It is the most common type of dementia and the fourth ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, physiological processes, limbic system
  • Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of - 960 words
    Alzheimers Disease : Neurobiology, Causes And Treatments Of Alzheimers disease : Neurobiology, causes and treatments of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common of the dementing illnesses. A progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. A person with Alzhiemers Disease may experience personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, confusion and difficulty finishing thoughts, following directions or even finding the right word to say in a conversation. Once advanced the sufferer may require a caretaker as daily chores become very difficult to accomplish. Evidence points toward amyloid as one of the main causes for the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, diagnosis treatment, main causes, nitric oxide
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive And Irreversible Brain Disease That Destroys Mental And Physical Functioning In Human Bei - 725 words
    Alzheimer's Disease is a progressive and irreversible brain disease that destroys mental and physical functioning in human beings, and invariably leads to death. It is the fourth leading cause of adult death in the United States. Alzheimer's creates emotional and financial catastrophe for many American families every year. Fortunately, a large amount of progress is being made to combat Alzheimer's disease every year. To fully be able to comprehend and combat Alzheimer's disease, one must know what it does to the brain, the part of the human body it most greatly affects. Many Alzheimer's disease sufferers had their brains examined. A large number of differences were present when comparing the ...
    Related: alzheimer's disease, alzheimers disease, brain, functioning, human beings, human body, parkinson's disease
  • Alzheimers Qa - 932 words
    Alzheimer's Q&A Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Assoc. Inc. 70 E. Lake Street, Suite 600 Chicago, Illinois 60601 What is Alzheimer's Disease? The most common form of dementing illness, Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. The person with AD may experience confusion, personality and behavior changes, impaired judgment, and difficulty finding words, finishing thoughts or following directions. It eventually leaves its victims incapable of caring for themselves. What happens to the brain in Alzheimer's Disease? The nerve cells in the part of the brain that controls memory, thinking, are d ...
    Related: chicago illinois, aging process, men and women, nerve, tissue
  • Aneurysms - 476 words
    Aneurysms By definition, an aneurysm is swelling of the blood vessel. They commonly occur in an artery or vein after a heart attack. An aneurysm can cause a blood clot, which can lead to major damage to the heart and brain. Identifying an aneurysm is very difficult. There are very little symptoms that can be detected. The symptoms change depending on where the artery is located:  A Thoracic aneurysm produces a dry cough; pain in the chest neck, back and abdomen. The pain may be sudden and sharp.  Abdominal aneurysm produces back pain, appetite and weight loss, and a pulsating mass in the abdomen.  Aneurysm in a leg artery causes poor circulation in the leg, with weakn ...
    Related: older people, congestive heart failure, heart failure, sudden, vessel
  • Animal Behavior - 2,263 words
    Animal Behavior Biology lb Abstract Animal behavior is predictable. Their behavioral tendencies are influenced by the relationship of its anatomy to their environment. By observing various forms of life, and associating the mechanism of their abilities to perform a behavioral action, evolutionary influence thereafter, can be analyzed and deduced from that point. Introduction The science and study of animal behavior involve an enormous array of complicated factors. For instance, stereotyped responses are unlearned behavioral reactions to some environmental stimulus predicated upon an organism relationship to its physical environment and anatomy. This obviously begs the question; is the observ ...
    Related: animal behavior, more important, field trip, guinea pig, incredible
  • Aphasia - 789 words
    Aphasia What is Aphasia? Aphasia is the impairment of spoken or written language caused by injury to the brain. It is also commonly referred to as Dysphasia. There are several different categories and many different types of Aphasia. What causes Aphasia? Aphasia is usually the result of a brain tumor, lesion, stroke, or severe blow to the head. Right-handed people can only acquire Aphasia if they have an injury in the left cerebral hemisphere, whereas left-handed people can quire Aphasia from an injury in either the right or left cerebral hemisphere. Therefor, left-handed people are more prone to getting Aphasia. Categories of Aphasia There are several different systems for categorizing Apha ...
    Related: aphasia, greek philosopher, brain tumor, written language, statistics
  • Bioethics - 2,379 words
    ... bes, where it travels to the uterus (Leone, Reproductive 13). Another method, "gamete intrafallopian transfer" (GIFT), is done by injecting sperm and an unfertilized egg into a fallopian tube, at which time conception and implantation will occur (Leone, Reproductive 13). Lastly is the "zona cracking" method. This technique involves piercing the outer layer of the egg and placing a single sperm cell within the egg, then embedding the fertilized egg into the woman (Leone, Reproductive 13). There is yet another well-known fashion for infertile couples to conceive a child - surrogate motherhood. In this process, the fertilized egg of one woman is allowed to develop in the womb of another. Su ...
    Related: national bioethics advisory, handicapped children, bill clinton, human life, agony
  • Bioethics - 2,379 words
    ... bes, where it travels to the uterus (Leone, Reproductive 13). Another method, "gamete intrafallopian transfer" (GIFT), is done by injecting sperm and an unfertilized egg into a fallopian tube, at which time conception and implantation will occur (Leone, Reproductive 13). Lastly is the "zona cracking" method. This technique involves piercing the outer layer of the egg and placing a single sperm cell within the egg, then embedding the fertilized egg into the woman (Leone, Reproductive 13). There is yet another well-known fashion for infertile couples to conceive a child - surrogate motherhood. In this process, the fertilized egg of one woman is allowed to develop in the womb of another. Su ...
    Related: national bioethics advisory, human race, down syndrome, kurt vonnegut, barrier
  • Capote Vs Krakauer - 824 words
    Capote Vs. Krakauer Capote/Krakauer Comparison Essay The most important thing any writer can do is to give their characters a feel of dimension to make them seem real. Although Capote and Krakauer do that in very different ways in In Cold Blood and Into Thin Air, they both reached the same end result: characters you believe. They give them thoughts, faces and personalities. They dont portray everyone as flawless, they display the faults and the little quirks. They give them life through words, making these stories believable. Despite the fact both incidents happened years before each book was written, the use of detailed facts and personality profiles make each story seem incredibly realisti ...
    Related: capote, krakauer, truman capote, small town, court case
  • Cardiac Rehabilitation - 272 words
    Cardiac Rehabilitation Despite major advances in cardiopulmonary bypass technology, surgical techniques, and anesthesia management, central nervous system complications remain a common problem after cardiopulmonary bypass. There are several potential causes of brain damage during open-heart surgery, including prolonged or severe arterial hypotension, as well as emboli emanating from the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit or the operative field(Benedict RH, 1994, Newman 1995). In the coronary artery bypass population, advanced age (* or = 75 years) is associated with an 8.9% neurologic deficit rate. Mortality is increased ninefold in the elderly patient with a neurologic deficit. Cerebral complic ...
    Related: cardiac, rehabilitation, central nervous, health care, newman
  • Catching Dreams - 746 words
    Catching Dreams Dreams are a window into the mind. These may be our most elaborate, distinctive, revealing, and flamboyant creations; they have fascinated us for thousands of years. The Egyptians built temples for dreaming. The oracles of Greece pondered cryptic dreams as the "royal road to the unconscious." Dreams allow us to view beyond that which we are and know in daily life; they hint of other dimensions of space and time. What do dreams really mean? Are they mirrors of your days, tunnels into pauses of the unconscious, or no more than the chance results of biological changes in the brain? No one knows the complete answer yet, but dream researchers are learning more and more about the r ...
    Related: catching, dream interpretation, dreams, waking life, cerebral cortex
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