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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: canon

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  • The Formation Of The Biblical Canon - 1,549 words
    The Formation Of The Biblical Canon The Canon of Biblical Writings For centuries now Christians have claimed to possess the special revelation of an omnipotent, loving Deity who is sovereign over all of His creation. This special revelation is in written form and is what has come to be known as The Bible which consists of two books. The first book is the Hebrew Scriptures, written by prophets in a time that was before Christ, and the second book is the New Testament, which was written by Apostles and disciples of the risen Lord after His ascension. It is well documented that Christians in the context of the early first century were used to viewing a set of writings as being not only authorit ...
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  • The Formation Of The Biblical Canon - 1,537 words
    ... s orthodoxy which means straight thinking. The truth or canon of faith in New Testament literature is what many claim to be the unifying and distinguishing elements. This was one of the issues that was harder to figure out among the early church. Upon examination of the New Testament text, it becomes apparent that there is not one unified view of theology present throughout the entire Bible. Lee McDonald says in his book, titled The Formation of the Biblical Canon, that the very presence of creedal formulations after the formation of a Christian biblical canon has manifestly demonstrated that orthodoxy itself was based upon a canon within the canon. This canon within the canon kept the ...
    Related: biblical, canon, formation, testament canon, jesus christ
  • The Principles Of New Testament Canon - 1,198 words
    The Principles Of New Testament Canon The Principles of New Testament Canon The process of determining New Testament canon is the study of how the twenty-seven books that are currently part of the New Testament came to be. From the many early Christian writings, only twenty-seven were placed into ecclesiastical canon. The process of researching New Testament canon is the study of how the select list of twenty-seven was formulated. The canonized books of the New Testament are considered sacred scripture, and have been determined to be canon throughout a very controversial history. The word canon comes from the Greek word kanon, which means reed, a tool for measurement or alignment. In the cra ...
    Related: canon, testament, testament canon, first christian, jewish religion
  • The Principles Of New Testament Canon - 1,175 words
    ... elates to its canonization. The idea of apostolicity does not refer only to the works that apostles wrote themselves. Apostolicity actually refers to the works that an apostle may have come into contact with at some point. Simply because an apostle came into contact with a certain work, does not ensure it of being guaranteed as a canonical work. Such works as The Teachings of the Twelve Apostles, Barnabas, and the Gospel of Peter, which inexplicably claim apostles as their authors, were not added in canon. Catholicity was another way of determining the reasons why certain works were included. The term catholicity meant that the work must be relevant to the church as a whole and was inten ...
    Related: canon, testament, testament canon, christian bible, small group
  • A Question Asked By Many People Is What Is The Difference Between Theravada And Mahayana Buddhism To Find The Answer Let Us L - 850 words
    A question asked by many people is What is the difference between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism? To find the answer let us look at the history of Buddhism and compare and contrast the beliefs and philosophies of the two. The Buddah, Siddhartha Gautama, was born in the 6th century B.C.E. in Northwestern India. The Buddah was the son of an aristocrat and grew up in a world of affluence and privilege. His father, Suddhodana took every precaution to make sure Siddhartha didn't experience anything that would hurt his happiness. The Buddah attained enlightenment at the age of 35 and spent his life teaching. He taught for 45 years and only slept for about two hours a day. What he taught was calle ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana, mahayana buddhism, theravada, theravada buddhism
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
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  • Abortion And Society - 1,096 words
    Abortion And Society Since the Darwinian Revolution of the 19th century our society has turned upside down. Everything under the sun had become questionable, the origin of life, how we came to be, where are we headed and what to do in the here all became questions in life. But one of the greatest impacts of this new age thinking is its effect on our Old World values. Western societies values, morals and ethics became debatable, with some people striving for change and others clinging for stability. Battle lines had been drawn and the Liberals and Conservatives were ready to duke it out on a number of issues. One of these debates centers on a womans right to have and abortion. According to th ...
    Related: abortion, bible says, birth control, female sexuality, codes
  • Abuses Of The Medieval Catholic Clergy - 1,431 words
    Abuses of the Medieval Catholic Clergy The Dark Ages of Europe were called such for several reasons. One of the more notorious reasons was the state of the Catholic Church. In the years before the Reformation, members of the Catholic clergy had reached an all time low in terms of their morality. The abuses of clerical power and privileges by the medieval clergy spanned all parts of their daily lives. Members of the Catholic clergy were financially, politically and socially corrupt. Each of these corruptions made up the enormous religious corruption that was the logical result of such debauchery. Of the several grievances against the Church, [t]he first and sorest was that she loved money, an ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, clergy, medieval, ordinary people
  • African Slaves - 490 words
    African Slaves On Thursday, June 29, 1820, at 3:00 P.M., 283 African slaves (two Africans were dead and 281 were in chains) were aboard a slave vessel named, The Antelope, when they were recaptured by the United States Treasury cutter Dallas, under the command of John Jackson. The seizure occurred between Amelia Island and the Florida Coast. After about 2,576 days of captivity and legal battle in the United States, 120 Africans died, 2 were missing, 39 were enslaved in the United States (the 39 included 36 men, one woman, and two boys), and 120 Africans of the Antelope, (there were 22 additional recaptured Africans that were sent with this group, bringing the number to 142), were released fr ...
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  • Authorship Theory - 1,081 words
    Authorship Theory For a host of persuasive but commonly disregarded reasons, the Earl of Oxford has quietly become by far the most compelling man to be found behind the mask of Shake-speare. As Orson Welles put it in 1954, I think Oxford wrote Shakespeare. If you don't agree, there are some awful funny coincidences incidences to explain away. Some of these coincidences are obscure, others are hard to overlook. A 1578 Latin encomium to Oxford, for example, contains some highly suggestive praise: Pallas lies concealed in thy right hand, it says. Thine eyes flash fire; Thy countenance shakes spears. Elizabethans knew that Pallas Athena was known by the sobriquet the spear-shaker. The hyphen in ...
    Related: authorship, christopher marlowe, edmund spenser, common sense, theater
  • Bahai Faith - 1,126 words
    Baha'i Faith The Bah' Faith The Bah' Faith proclaims itself to be the youngest of the independent world religions. Its roots stem from Iran during the mid-nineteenth century. This new faith is primarily based on the founder, Bah'u'llh, meaning 'the Glory of God'. Bah's (the believers) in many places around the world have been heavily persecuted for their beliefs and differences and have been branded by many as a cult, a reform movement and/or a sect of the Muslim religion. The Bah' Faith is unique in that it accepts the teachings of what they believe to be all the divine messengers, these are Abraham, Moses, Zoroaster, the Buddha, Jesus and Muhammad. The faith believes each messenger is equa ...
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  • Barbaulds Prophecy And Blakes Imagination - 1,136 words
    Barbauld's Prophecy And Blake's Imagination Barbauld's Prophecy and Blake's Imagination The Romantic Era was a time of widespread cultural, social, and political reform. Industrialization was taking the place of the agrarian lifestyle, which introduced problems such as higher poverty, a larger segregation of class, and overworking of both adults and children. The wars in America and France paved the way for political upheaval by introducing new ways of thinking and radicals who wanted change. With all of this turmoil and chaos many writers turned to escapism, which involved both imagination, and prophecy. Imagination and prophecy are merely two ways the writers of this time thought, hence, b ...
    Related: imagination, prophecy, william blake, works cited, western world
  • Boundaries Of Ownership - 3,055 words
    Boundaries Of Ownership BOUNDARIES OF OWNERSHIP Nobody owns this essay. It is important that I make this very clear and that I do so at the earliest possible moment. I must do this because the essay that you are reading is about intellectual property, and that means that this essay must be self-referential. When one writes or speaks or communicates in any way about intellectual property, one is dealing with some of the most basic rules of the very medium in which one is operating. There is no neutral ground here, no possibility of genuine detachment or objectivity. Either I am going to claim the protection of the current laws that apply in the United States and under the World Intellectual P ...
    Related: ownership, digital technology, constitutional law, intellectual property, favorite
  • Buddhism - 1,081 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is a religion and philosophy founded by Siddhartha Gautama in northeast India during the period from the late 6th century to the early 4th century BC. Spreading from India to Central and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan, Buddhism has played an influential role in the spiritual, cultural, and social life of much of the Eastern world. The Buddha, which means the "Enlightened One," died in northeastern India between 500 and 350 BC. According to tradition, his family name was Gautama; later sources call him Siddhartha, which means "He Who Has Reached His Goal." He was reared in a minor royal family of the ruling Kshatriya, or warrior, caste. Shocked as a young man after ...
    Related: buddhism, tantric buddhism, zen buddhism, central asia, noble eightfold path
  • Buddhism - 1,875 words
    Buddhism I have considered myself to be a fairly religious person. I went to a Presbyterian elementary and middle school, a Christian School. At C.S. we had a religion class everyday. The difference from then and now is then we learned strictly about Christianity. I had never heard about evolution and other religions until I was in high school. I had only known that there was one God, and it was He to which we prayed. I knew that there was a heaven and a hell. The good people went to heaven and the bad to hell. In much more depth of course, but needless to say that was very naive. I had a Humanities class my sophomore year in high school. In this class we learned about all of the religions, ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana buddhism, theravada buddhism, middle school, china korea
  • Buddhism - 1,718 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the major religions of the world it was founded by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, who lived in northern India from c.560 to c.480 BC. The time of the Buddha was a time of social and religious change, the development of trade and cities, the breakdown of old tribal traditions, and the rise of many new religious movements that answered the demands of the times. These movements came from the Brahmanic tradition of Hinduism but were also reactions against it. Of the new sects, Buddhism was the most successful and eventually spread throughout India and most of Asia. Today Buddhism is divided into two main branches. The Theravada, or "Way of the Elders," the more conse ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana buddhism, tantric buddhism, tibetan buddhism, changing world
  • Buddhism A Way To Salvation - 1,262 words
    Buddhism A Way to Salvation "Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religions for the future: it transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology, it covers both the natural and spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity." (Albert Einstein) Known as one of the worlds great religions, it is professed by over 3500,000,000 people, most of whom live in the Far East. Buddhism is based on the teachings of Siddharta Gautama, who is more commonly known as Buddha, the "Enlightened One". It was developed during the fifth and sixth centuries BCE around 535 BCE, which was t ...
    Related: buddhism, salvation, right speech, right effort, confusion
  • Buddhism Details - 905 words
    Buddhism Details The most devoted followers of the Buddha were organized into a sangha. Its members were identified by their shaved heads and robes made of un-sewn orange cloth. The early Buddhist monks, or bhikkus, wandered from place to place, settling down in communities only during the rainy season when travel was difficult. Theravadan monks and nuns were humble and obtained their food in the form of offering on a daily round of the homes of Lay devotees. Among the traditional functions of the Buddhist monks are the performance of funerals and memorial services in honor of the dead. Major elements of such services include the chanting of scripture and transfer of merit for the benefit of ...
    Related: buddhism, holy spirit, ten commandments, the bible, conscience
  • Buddhism Of Theravada And Mahayana - 855 words
    Buddhism Of Theravada And Mahayana A question asked by many people is " What is the difference between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism?" To find the answer let us look at the history of Buddhism and compare and contrast the beliefs and philosophies of the two. The Buddah, Siddhartha Gautama, was born in the 6th century B.C.E. in Northwestern India. The Buddah was the son of an aristocrat and grew up in a world of affluence and privilege. His father, Suddhodana took every precaution to make sure Siddhartha didnt experience anything that would hurt his happiness. The Buddah attained enlightenment at the age of 35 and spent his life teaching. He taught for 45 years and only slept for about two ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana, mahayana buddhism, theravada, theravada buddhism
  • Calvin - 1,997 words
    Calvin This man, undoubtedly the greatest of ../cathen/12495a.htm divines, and perhaps, after ../cathen/02084a.htm, the most perseveringly followed by his disciples of any Western writer on theology, was born at Noyon in Picardy, France, 10 July, 1509, and died at Geneva, 27 May, 1564. A generation divided him from ../cathen/09438b.htm, whom he never met. By birth, education, and temper these two protagonists of the reforming movement were strongly contrasted. Luther was a Saxon peasant, his father a miner; Calvin sprang from the French middle-class, and his father, an attorney, had purchased the freedom of the City of Noyon, where he practised civil and canon law. Luther entered the Order o ...
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