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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: camus

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  • Finding Patterns In Hemingway And Camus: Construction Of Meaning And Truth By Robert D Lane And Steven M Lane Once We Knew Th - 2,422 words
    Finding Patterns in Hemingway and Camus: Construction of Meaning and Truth by Robert D. Lane and Steven M. Lane Once we knew that literature was about life and criticism was about fiction--and everything was simple. Now we know that fiction is about other fiction, is criticism in fact, or metaphor. And we know that criticism is about the impossibility of anything being about life, really, or even about fiction, or finally about anything. Criticism has taken the very idea of "aboutness" away from us. It has taught us that language is tautological, if it is not nonsense, and to the extent that it is about anything it is about itself. Robert Scholes One of the fascinations of reading literature ...
    Related: construction, hemingway, lane, steven, separate peace
  • Hemingway And Camus: Construction Of Meaning And Truth - 2,421 words
    Hemingway and Camus: Construction of Meaning and Truth $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! Hemingway and Camus: Construction of Meaning and Truth Once we knew that literature was about life and criticism was about fiction--and everything was simple. Now we know that fiction is about other fiction, is criticism in fact, or metaphor. And we know that criticism is about the impossibility of anything being about life, really, or even about fiction, or finally about anything. Criticism has taken the very idea of "aboutness" away from us. It has taught us that language is tautological, if it is not nonsense, and to the extent that it is about anything it is about itself. ...
    Related: construction, hemingway, a farewell to arms, quantum theory, certainty
  • Hemingway And Camus: Construction Of Meaning And Truth - 2,413 words
    ... ry situations. These moments are often unexpected, coming anytime and in any set of circumstances (time and chance). I ate the end of my piece of cheese and took a swallow of wine. Through the other noise I heard a cough, then came the chuh-chuh-chuh-chuh - then there was a flash, as when a blast-furnace door is swung open, and a roar that started white and went red and on and on in a rushing wind. I tried to breathe but my breath would not come and I felt myself rush bodily out of myself and out and out and out and all the time bodily in the wind. I went out swiftly, all of myself, and I knew I was dead and that it had all been a mistake to think you just died. Then I floated, and inste ...
    Related: construction, hemingway, hemingway review, separate peace, e. e. cummings
  • Letranger By Albert Camus - 549 words
    L'Etranger By Albert Camus In Letranger, an existentialist novel written by Albert Camus, the reader begins to discover that women are treated abusively or poorly. The main character in Letranger, Meursault, views women as lesser than men; which ultimately conveys how women were thought of in Africa for that time period. In the second chapter, the reader first begins to get an idea of Meursault character, and his feelings towards women. After swimming with Marie Cordona, who once worked as a typist at Meursault office, he invites her to the cinema. This is very inappropriate, as his mother had died only a few days earlier. During the film, Meursault proceeds to fondle Maries breasts, and eve ...
    Related: albert, albert camus, camus, main character, penguin books
  • Meursault By Albert Camus - 1,192 words
    Meursault By Albert Camus Testing the Boundaries of Algerian Conventional Society In this essay, I am going to explore Albert Camus use of Meursaults murder trial in The Stranger to note the absurdity of the defined social behavior in Algeria while forcing the reader to evaluate his or her own morality. Camus asks the reader to form a mental and emotional relationship with Meursault through the descriptive and, in the end, destructively honest narrative. He then asks the reader to depend not on the law, which in this novel represents conventional social behavior, but on this newfound relationship to decide Meursault fate. Camus introduction of Meursault uses straightforward and very honest l ...
    Related: albert, albert camus, camus, meursault, self awareness
  • Priest And Chaplain The Characters Of The Chaplain, In Albert Camus The Outsider, And The Priest, In Franz Kafkas The Trial, - 472 words
    Priest and Chaplain The characters of the chaplain, in Albert Camus The Outsider, and the priest, in Franz Kafkas The Trial, are quite similar, and are pivotal to the development of the novel. These characters serve essentialy to bring the question of God and religion to probe the existentialist aspects of it, in novels completely devoid of religious context. The main idea visible about these two characters is that they are both the last ones seen by the protagonists, Mearsault and K., both non-believers in the word of the lord. Whereas the chaplain in The Outsider tries to make Mearsault believe in the existence of god, the priest tries to warn and explain to K. what will happen to him. The ...
    Related: albert, albert camus, camus, chaplain, franz, priest
  • Stranger Of Camus - 1,025 words
    Stranger Of Camus In The Stranger, as in all Camus works, Camus views on freedom and death one dependent on the other are major themes. For Camus, freedom arises in awareness of ones life, the every-moment life, an intense glorious life that needs no redeeming, no regrets, no tears. Death is unjustifiable, absurd; it is but a reintegration into the cosmos for a "free" man. Until a person reaches this awareness, life, like death, is absurd, and indeed, generically, life remains absurd, though each individuals life can be valuable and meaningful to him. In a sense, The Stranger is a parable of Camus philosophy, with emphasis on that which is required for freedom. Meursault, hero of The Stran ...
    Related: camus, stranger, the awakening, facing death, logical
  • The Plague, By Albert Camus - 501 words
    "The Plague", by Albert Camus The novel that I chose to do this report on was, "The Plague", by Albert Camus. It is about a plague that hit the European countries in the middle ages. I chose to describe the literary term of parallelism. Here are some following facts about the story's plot that involve parallelism through the novel. The novel begins at Oran where the plague becomes known. The main character, Dr. Gernard Rieux, is a doctor. In the beginning of the story he finds a dead rat on the floor. Even in those times rats were not found dead on the middle of the floor. This was unusual, but he threw out the rat and forgot about it. Eventually the dead rats began to pile into large masses ...
    Related: albert, albert camus, camus, main character, middle ages
  • The Priestkafka Vs Camus - 1,133 words
    The Priest(Kafka vs Camus) The Outsider, written by Albert Camus, and The Trial, written by Franz Kafka, are two books that have been critically acclaimed since the time that they were published. There are critics that claim that The Outsider is a dull book, and is not even a read-worthy book. Other people claim that it shows us how society actually acts upon people who do not want to be like the rest of society. The Trial falls under the same kind of criticism; but both books, although written by different writers in a different poque, fall under the same kind of genre: Imprisoned Lives. In both The Outsider and The Trial there are many people who influence the protagonists in a positive an ...
    Related: albert camus, camus, jesus christ, the girl, ethics
  • The Stranger By Albert Camus - 664 words
    The Stranger by Albert Camus In The Stranger, Albert Camus portrays Meursault, the book's narrator and main character, as aloof, detached, and unemotional. He does not think much about events or their consequences, nor does he express much feeling in relationships or during emotional times. He displays an impassiveness throughout the book in his reactions to the people and events described in the book. After his mother's death he sheds no tears; seems to show no emotions. He displays limited feelings for his girlfriend, Marie Cardona, and shows no remorse at all for killing an Arab. His reactions to life and to people distances him from his emotions, positive or negative, and from intimate r ...
    Related: albert, albert camus, camus, stranger, young woman
  • Absurd - 1,347 words
    Absurd Theatre Influences on Theatre of the Absurd Big feet, stampeding rhinoceroses, and barren sets are typical of the theatre of the absurd. The dramatic content, symbolism, and spectacles are an amazing thing to see and an impossibility to comprehend. The philosophy of the absurd and the dawn of mankind influenced these plays in the twentieth century. The main proponents and works of the theater of the absurd and philosophy were influenced by the chaotic actions of the early and mid-twentieth century. These chaotic actions led them to search for something in literature and drama never seen before. A brief survey of the main proponents and works of the absurd philosophy and theater can le ...
    Related: absurd, human life, north africa, political power, cycle
  • Absurd - 1,338 words
    ... hinoceros, as being the Nazi influence, and Berenger, the main character, as an ordinary man in an extraordinary situation. The chaos of the early to mid-twentieth century influenced Ionesco's life and work's greatly. He struggled with the concept of the absurd and soon became the father of the theatre of the absurd. He led men such as Samuel Beckett and Jean Genet to a greater understanding of the absurd. Samuel Beckett was one of the greatest names of the theater of the absurd. He spent a lifetime of hardship and work to overcome the challenges of his low self-esteem and confidence. He grew up in Dublin, Ireland, in a prominent family. After college, he was employed as James Joyce's se ...
    Related: absurd, modern world, liberation organization, middle class, autobiographical
  • Absurd Hero - 873 words
    Absurd Hero Albert Camus is a very hard man to figure out. He puts very complex thoughts and emotions into his writings, and you have to draw them out strategically. His thoughts of how everyday people live and think are genuine and you can see that in his writing. I am basing all my knowledge here on Camus book, The Stranger, and his essay, The Myth of Sisyphus. Camus said in his essay on Sisyphus, Sisyphus is an absurd hero. Camus talks of how Sisyphus, a man punished to continually roll a rock up a mountain only to watch it come tumbling back down, is a perfect example of an absurd hero. He says that he is the absurd hero as much through his passions as through his torture. His scorn of t ...
    Related: absurd, albert camus, myth of sisyphus, stuff, consciousness
  • Absurdity And The Stranger - 615 words
    Absurdity And The Stranger Absurdity is defined as that which is contrary to reason; clearly untrue, unreasonable or ridiculous. It is often a topic in existentialist writings relating to life. This subject is prevalent in Camus The Stranger and The Myth of Sisyphus. Camus depicts absurdity bringing about happiness or indifference in each of these literary works. In The Myth of Sisyphus, it is made clear that Sisyphus is aware that his existence is absurd. He is sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a steep mountain only to let it roll back down when it reaches its peak. His tragedy lies in the fact that he is conscious of the extent of his own misery. He is the ultimate absurd; t ...
    Related: absurdity, stranger, death sentence, moral code, complain
  • Allegory Of The Cave And The Myth Of Sisyphus - 660 words
    Allegory Of The Cave And The Myth Of Sisyphus The Allegory of the Cave, written by Plato, is a parable entailing that humans are afraid of change and what they do not know. In this situation he gives, men are living in an underground cave. There is only one entrance and it is at the top. Near the entrance of the cave there is a fire burning which casts a shadow. The men living in the cave have been there their whole life. They are chained so that they can only see the wall and cannot turn around. When objects pass by it creates a shadow on the wall. The shadows are the only thing they can see and therefore is the only thing they know to exist. Somehow one of them gets loose and wonders outsi ...
    Related: allegory, allegory of the cave, cave, myth, myth of sisyphus, sisyphus
  • Atwoods The Handmaids Tale: A Study Of Rebellion - 1,051 words
    ... e to see her daughter and husband someday. So she must survive for their sake because she needs to believe that they are still alive. Her dreams and reality become intertwined and this makes her fight for her sanity. Offred fights to retain her peace of mind. She says , sanity is a valuealble possession; I save it, so I will have enough when the time comes. (Atwood,140) To be sane is to be alive. If she were insane and blindly following orders she would be living, but she wouldn't be alive. Offred lives, as usual, by ignoring.Ignoring isn't the same as ignorance you have to work at it.(Atwood,734) For Offred obedience comes at a great price, Johnson characterizes it as a death of the sen ...
    Related: handmaids tale, margaret atwood, rebellion, social trends, internal conflict
  • Capital Puinishment - 1,670 words
    ... fers. The methods of capital punishment in use in 1997 included hanging, firing squad, electrocution, suffocation in the lethal gas chamber, and lethal injection (NCADP). The traditional execution by hanging is still used in a few states today. Death on the gallows can make for a slow and agonizing demise by strangulation if the drop is too short. Or, if the drop is too long, the head will be torn off. Two states still use the firing squad method, in which the condemned is hooded, strapped into a chair, and a target is pinned on the chest. Five marksmen take aim and fire (NCADP). During the twentieth century, electrocution has been the most widely applied form of execution in the United ...
    Related: capital punishment, albert camus, human life, violent crime, intensity
  • Capital Punishment - 1,044 words
    Capital Punishment Capital punishment is a brutal, antiquated concept that must be abolished in the name of civilized society. A humane culture cannot abide the organized extermination of human beings in the name of justice. In the United States, dozens of people are put to death every year like stray animals, only perhaps in less humane ways. The methods of capital punishment vary greatly, but none are publicly accepted as humane. Society's support for the death penalty is waning, but there is still enough support in the United States to keep it legal in many states. The death penalty exercises only the most primal instincts to kill and extract revenge in an organized fashion. This is why t ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, death penalty, civil rights, tolerated
  • Clamence Is Not Alone - 918 words
    Clamence Is Not Alone Clamence Is Not Alone The Fall, a 1957 novel written by Nobel Prize winner Albert Camus, is a story based on confession. The main character, Jean-Baptiste Clamence, portrays himself to be the epitome of good citizenship and acceptable behavior and now he has come to face the reality that his existence has been deeply seated in hypocrisy. Clamence also openly enjoys the wealth of cheap dreams that the prostitutes and bars his Amsterdam home has to offer. In a bar called Mexico City, Clamence begins to recall his life as a respected lawyer, supposedly immune to judgment. There are different theories on whether Clamence recalls his life to himself or to another person, but ...
    Related: main character, prize winner, albert camus, arrive, concealed
  • Class Struggles - 2,658 words
    ... oyer, who are the exploiters ? Who makes up the dominant class today ? This question will become clear if we bear in mind there are two ways to move goods in society, by the use of violence, which is the political way, by trade and gifts, which is the economic way. Capitalism is the use of trade and gifts, not the use of politics, to distribute goods in society. All other regimes resort to violence. Marx and Engels emphasize the point themselves. Feudalism and slavery are based on state coactive powers. The results of their work are simply confiscated from the workers, and if they do not like it and try to escape, policemen and soldiers will drag them back to where they belong, so they m ...
    Related: class struggle, middle class, ruling class, technological innovation, total population
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