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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: advent

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  • 1984 - 1,015 words
    1984 1. Biography George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a British writer with political conscience. He was born in India but educated in England at Eton College. He served the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927. In sick health, he returned to Europe to live in poverty as a struggling writer. Orwell joined the Republican forces in the Spanish civil war, and wrote a chilling account of this experience. He went on to write many books, mostly autobiographical, and achieved successes as a brilliant writer. 2. Synopsis The novel takes place in a theoretical and fictional dystopian totalitarian society. The story begins in London on April 4, 1984 after an atomic world w ...
    Related: 1984, erich fromm, middle class, first person, arthur
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    Abortion Almost half of American women have terminated at least one pregnancy, and millions more Americans of both sexes have helped them, as partners, parents, health-care workers, counselors, friends. Collectively, it would seem, Americans have quite a bit of knowledge and experience of abortion. Yet the debate over legal abortion is curiously abstract: we might be discussing brain transplants. Farfetched analogies abound: abortion is like the Holocaust, or slavery; denial of abortion is like forcing a person to spend nine months intravenously hooked up to a medically endangered stranger who happens to be a famous violinist. It sometimes seems that the further abortion is removed from the ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, legalizing abortion, nineteenth century, control laws
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Alternative Cinema - 1,558 words
    Alternative Cinema The term alternative cinema has certain connotations. To many, it is not alternative, instead it is the way cinema was meant to be viewed, in that the viewer should be able to define the film in their own personal terms. In the following essay, I will firstly examine what the term alternative cinema means, and secondly how Brechts theories are evident in many elements of the films that have been pigeon-holed as alternative cinema. The word alternative is described in Collins English Dictionary as: "Denoting a lifestyle, culture, art form, etc., regarded by its adherents as preferable to that of contemporary society because it is less conventional, materialistic, or institu ...
    Related: alternative energy, alternative medicine, cinema, united artists, german expressionism
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,272 words
    Analysis On Bulgaria External historical events often changed Bulgaria's national boundaries in its first century of existence, natural terrain features defined most boundaries after 1944, and no significant group of people suffered serious economic hardship because of border delineation. Postwar Bulgaria contained a large percentage of the ethnic Bulgarian people, although numerous migrations into and out of Bulgaria occurred at various times. None of the country's borders was officially disputed in 1991, although nationalist Bulgarians continued to claim that Bulgaria's share of Macedonia--which it shared with both Yugoslavia and Greece--was less than just because of the ethnic connection ...
    Related: bulgaria, district court, separation of church and state, public transportation, music
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,248 words
    Applied Nostalgia Applied Nostalgia--A Parental Look Back Without past memories, Americans lack a standard to base present conditions upon. These memories lie carefully shuffled and categorized in the giant shifter called the brain to crudely approximate the present standard of life. They hope to draw gratification and fulfillment in the progression of the quality of their and especially their children's lives. This innate desire to compare the past to the present drives personal and political decisions, especially conservatives who advocate a change to the policies and values of the past. Today, the faded memories of an emerging group of parents of their post-World War II upbringing, like c ...
    Related: last year, equal rights, world war ii, prepare, california
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,121 words
    ... rature if there is only one thing that exists? By definition temperature is the speed and frequency of collisions between particles. Thus we find ourselves once more in a paradoxical situation. On the one hand the equations predict a specific temperature greater than zero but, on the other hand, the unified state must be at temperature zero because there are no particle interactions. This tendency to paradox displayed by the equations of cosmology and built into the foundations of mathematics, if looked at squarely and taken at face value, is telling us something profound about the structure of the world. Paradox is built into the fabric of the universe in a profound and interesting way. ...
    Related: religion, science, face value, moral implications, advent
  • Atomic - 2,303 words
    Atomic Bomb Then a tremendous flash of light cut across the sky . Mr. Tanimoto has a distinct recollection that it traveled from east to west, from the city toward the hills. It seemed like a sheet of sun. РJohn Hersey, from Hiroshima, pp.8 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was slightly bigger than an ordinary bomb, yet could cause infinitely more destruction. It could rip through walls and tear down houses like the devils wrecking ball. In Hiroshima it killed 100,000 people, most non-military civilians. Three day ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, albert einstein, cuban missile, eliminate
  • Australia And Asia Relationship - 1,209 words
    Australia and Asia relationship Australia and Asia relationship This essay analyses the Australian-China bilateral relationship since 1945 and in particular its political significance to Australia. Many global factors have influenced this relationship, including the advent of the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the collapse of the Soviet bloc European nations. In addition, internal political changes in Australia and China have both affected and been affected by the global changes. It will be analysed that Australia's bilateral relationship with China has always had a sharp political edge but that approaching the new millenium economics and trade considerations are shaping Austr ...
    Related: asia, asia pacific, australia, east asia, political system
  • Australian Bicameralism - 1,252 words
    Australian Bicameralism Australian Bicameralism. Bicameralism in Australia has a long history dating back to the pre-Federation colonial parliaments. These structures, in turn, evolved from their British forbear, the parliament at Westminster. At federal and state levels there has been considerable debate and controversy over the continuing efficacy and efficiency of the two-house model. Is it necessary or desirable to maintain two houses of parliament for state and federal governments in Australia? Did the Queensland government do the right thing in abolishing its upper house? What is the future of bicameralism in Australia? These are some of the questions that this essay will seek to addre ...
    Related: australian, australian government, party system, proportional representation, limit
  • Babylon Fall In Bible And History - 1,223 words
    ... istry began in 1831. Before the time of disappointment in 1844, had been joined by around 300 other ministers. 135,000 people are estimated to have expressed their commitment to the movement. This was a significant part of the population of the United States (ref.#8). Thus 1831 would mark the beginning of the call of the first angel (Rev. 14:6, 7). As the movement was coming to its climax, the Protestant churches began to denounce the new ideas, placing themselves in the position of corrupted Babylon. The second angel's message, therefore, began shortly before the time of disappointment in the fall of 1844. The third angel predicts God's final wrath for those who accepted the beast's mar ...
    Related: babylon, bible, history, holy spirit, before christ
  • Bartelby The Scrivener By Melville - 1,209 words
    ... used to change his message despite the consequences..." (SS for S pg. 1) Critic Mark Elliot, while writing an overview critique of Bartelby the Scrivener, wrote these words in an attempt to justify why he believes that the character Bartelby could represent the author Melville. When reading Elliots words, I cannot help but see the direct connection. Like Melville, Bartelby served as a sort of an outcast due to his methods and resistance to change. Bartelby was seen as an outcast, not only by the narrator, but by the fictive society set in the story. Like Melville who was described as a common sailor, Bartelby was also seen as aimless in his approach. Last, but not least, Bartelby, much l ...
    Related: melville, scrivener, short fiction, different ways, mark
  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Brave New World By Huxley - 1,145 words
    Brave New World By Huxley Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World out of fear of society's apparent lack of morals and corrupt behaviour during the roaring twenties. Huxley believed that the future was doomed to a non-individualistic, conformist society, a society void of the family unit, religion and human emotions. Throughout the novel, Huxley predicts many events for the future, most of which concentrate on a morally corrupt society. The most important of these predictions include: greater sexual freedom, over-population, brain-washing/sleep-teaching, and the use of mind altering drugs. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World warns of a possible future dystopia, based on social attitudes and medical ...
    Related: aldous huxley, brave, brave new world, huxley, third world, third world countries, world aldous huxley
  • Campaign Finance - 1,231 words
    Campaign Finance Campaign finance reform has already become an issue for debate in this election year's primaries. This matter does not hold a large amount of interest for the average American, it is not an issue that is going to sway a large amount of voters. The book examines all facets of campaign finance including sources of contributions and finance reform. The book then takes a close, hard look at the 1980 presidential election and the 1982 congressional races. The author approaches the subject matter in a very thorough and systematic method. He makes very insightful comments on the state of campaign finance in the early 1980's which are still relevant in this election year because thi ...
    Related: campaign, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, campaign reform, election campaign, finance
  • Canadian National Unity - 1,756 words
    ... esses that so much redundancy exists in administration and so much money is spent on bilingualization and transferred needlessly from rich province to poor province in an effort to keep Quebec inside the confederation that after separation both Quebec and English-speaking Canada would be better off, financially and otherwise. Without addressing this contention, the same assumption occurs here: after Quebec leaves, Canada remains united. The assumption that Quebec voters would not accept the economic costs and risks of separation and were not subject to romantic sentiment on this issue proved wrong. Until a week before the referendum, virtually no one predicted the closeness of the vote. ...
    Related: canadian, canadian economy, national history, national policy, unity
  • Cari Sobczynski - 1,537 words
    ... of the main reasons of the success of the solid south was its emphasis on their past and the continuation of traditional government and upholding that legacy. More modernization continued through the turn of the century. There began to be good population booms in the urban areas. There was also a rapid expansion with industry. Cities were beginning to center themselves the new mills, railroads, and trading ports. Cotton mills spread across the South and grew into large operations with more efficient machinery. New advancements in agriculture allowed for it to become less labor intensive. Therefore, lessening the need for many hired hands. Those workers went to the new urban factories fo ...
    Related: democratic party, luther king, ku klux klan, boom, swing
  • Causes For Germanies Entry To Ww - 1,236 words
    Causes For Germanies Entry To Ww1 Germanies Entry into World War 1 November 25, 2000 World War One was caused solely by the aggression of one country and its allies. It was made possible by the political, military and economical environments inside the aggressor country. These all contributed to the initiation of the First World War by the then mayor European power, Germany. To the credit of the Prussians, Germany had the largest (except for Russia), best equipped and best-trained army of Europe. With their innovative use of the heavy machine gun (the Maxim gun) in protected pillboxes the German quickly had an edge in over the other European armies. To use this military might in an effective ...
    Related: entry, important role, twentieth century, german government, machine
  • Celeron Or Pentium Ii - 1,665 words
    Celeron Or Pentium Ii? Celeron or Pentium II? Author: Pallav Gupta Instructor: Lisa Anne Culp Fall 1998 The computer industry is flourishing because of the advent of new, powerful processors. Recently, Intel Corp. released its Pentium II-450 MHz chip: the fastest processor on the planet. But because the chip is overpriced, Intel is also marketing the downgraded version of a PII, the inexpensive Celeron-333 which has a 128K cache compared to the PII's 512K cache. To potential computer buyers, this situation presents a dilemma because they must decide whether to opt for price (i.e. buy the Celeron) or speed (i.e. buy the PII-450). In an attempt to answer this question, Lincoln Spector of PC Wo ...
    Related: intel pentium, pentium, intel corp, markup language, analyze
  • Cell Communication - 1,237 words
    Cell Communication Physiology In the human body there are many parts that work together in order for everything to function properly, but even these parts need to have a way to know what to do. This is where cell communication comes into play. Tiny cells in the body contain astounding networks that allow for this communication. Scientists are discovering why these messages from cell to cell are so efficient, and this could lead to new therapies for diseases. In the past 15 years, scientists have discovered more of the code the cells use for their internal communications. Signal transmission begins when a messenger "docks" temporarily with a specific receptor on a recipient cell. This recepto ...
    Related: cell, communication system, human cells, building blocks, module
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