Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: adulthood

  • 301 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • >>>
  • Barbara Mason - 1,067 words
    Barbara Mason Human Growth and Development Anne Brooks Lesson 11:Ages 65 on up: Late Adulthood The Results of Aging THEORIES OF WHY WE AGE Since research into aging is not guided by any one universally accepted theory, genetic, cellular, and physiological studies have yielded several hypotheses. Genetics The most popular genetic theory, the Error Theory, assumes that aging is the result of the accumulation of random genetic damage, or from small errors in the flow of genetic information. The damage or errors would reduce or prevent proper cell function. Cellular The best known theory of aging in cellular research is called the Hayflick Effect, which is named after the American microbiologist ...
    Related: barbara, mason, computer software, cognitive functioning, limiting
  • Beowulf - 531 words
    Beowulf Authors often use events and things to symbolize stages in someone's life. Symbolism is the practice of representing things by means of symbols or of attributing meaning of significance to objects, events, or relationships. In Beowulf, Beowulf fights Grendel, Grendel's mother, and a fire-breathing dragon. In the anonymous epic Beowulf, Beowulf's battles symbolize the youth, adulthood, and old age of Beowulf's life. First, the battle with Grendel represents the youth of Beowulf's life. The typical youth is very brave and fights for fame. Beowulf shows how the battle with Grendel is a representation of the youth of Beowulf's life by going to Hrothgar and asking him if he can fight Gren ...
    Related: beowulf, grendel's mother, the monster, epic, likes
  • Biography Malcolm X - 1,023 words
    Biography Malcolm X Malcolm X The name Malcolm X still stirs emotions of fear and hatred in many Americans. When he was murdered in the Ballroom in Harlem on February 21, 1965, he was world-famous as the angriest black man in America. This is true because unlike Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X advocated freedom for blacks by any means necessary. For him, even the use of violence was a viable solution to fight racial discrimination. Because of such views some people still associate Malcolm X with the Black Panther movement of the sixties which they believe was a radical and violent organization. But portraying Malcolm X simply as a violent black activist fails to represent the whole picture ...
    Related: biography, malcolm, malcolm x, racial discrimination, junior high school
  • Biography Malcolm X - 1,033 words
    ... the membership reached approximately 30,000 by 1963. Malcolm X was very outspoken. He was never afraid to speak to the public about what he believed in even if it was dangerous to do so. Especially during the sixties, it was very dangerous for the blacks to speak unpleasant things about the whites. Although the American society was out of slavery, the social atmosphere was negative for blacks and the whites were very abusive to the blacks physically and mentally. Regardless of perilous surroundings, Malcolm X made lots of shocking statements in his speeches. Those statements aroused the blacks and encouraged them to think and recognize how discriminated their lives were. He gathered hug ...
    Related: biography, malcolm, malcolm x, elijah muhammad, afro american
  • Biological Viruses: All Time Enemies - 1,132 words
    ... a rash of fluid-filled blisters that begin as red spots covering most of the body and the inside of the mouth. The disease is dangerous to newborns, to people first infected in adulthood, and to those in whom the virus remains dormant in nerve cells, erupting as the more painful and sometimes chronic zoster (shingles) later in life. VZV is a member of the Herpes virus family, which also includes the causative agents of infectious mononucleosis, roseola, and oral and genital herpes (Microsoft Encarta 96 Encyclopedia). An extremely contagious viral disease, chiefly of children, characterized by early fever, an eruption of papules and vesicles, and mild constitutional disturbances. In most ...
    Related: biological, hepatitis b, drinking water, microsoft corporation, tube
  • Black Boy - 661 words
    Black Boy 3. Black Boy, Richard Wright Black Boy, is both an indictment of American racism and a narrative of the artist's development. As a child growing up in the Jim Crow South, Richard faced constant pressure to submit to white authority. However, even from an early age, Richard had a fierce spirit of rebellion. Had he lacked the resilience to be different despite the pressure to conform to social expectations, he would probably never have become an internationally renowned writer. The entire system of institutional racism was designed to prevent the American black's development of aspirations beyond menial labor. Racist whites were extremely hostile to black literacy and even more so to ...
    Related: black american, black boy, black community, black people, richard wright
  • Blooming Trinity - 1,233 words
    Blooming Trinity English 1302.018 October 11, 2000 Blooming Trinity In the poem When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloomd, by Walt Whitman, three important symbols are introduced. These symbols of a star, the lilac, and a bird exhibit Whitmans transcendentalism and serve as an allusion to Abraham Lincolns life and death. Whitmans poetry, through these symbols, opens a window to the prevailing social attitudes, moral beliefs, and cultural disposition of his time through his allusions to President Lincoln. To understand Whitmans poetry one must first know something about the poet himself. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island New York. Whitman disliked the idea of becoming a carpe ...
    Related: trinity, abraham lincoln, langston hughes, ralph waldo, representing
  • Born Addicted To Alcohol - 1,333 words
    Born Addicted to Alcohol annon There are different characteristics that accompany FAS in the different stages of a child's life. 'At birth, infants with intrauterine exposure to alcohol frequently have low birth rate; pre-term delivery; a small head circumference; and the characteri stic facial features of the eyes, nose, and mouth' (Phelps, 1995, p. 204). Some of the facial abnormalities that are common of children with FAS are: microcephaly, small eye openings, broad nasal bridge, flattened mid-faces, thin upper lip, skin folds at the corners of the eyes, indistinct groove on the upper lip, and an abnormal smallness of the lower jaw (Wekselman, Spiering, Hetteberg, Kenner, & Flandermey ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol syndrome, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, short term
  • Boys And Girls - 1,104 words
    Boys And Girls In her story, Boys and Girls, Alice Munro depicts the hardships and successes of the rite of passage into adulthood through her portrayal of a young narrator and her brother. Through the narrator, the subject of the profound unfairness of sex-role stereotyping, and the effect this has on the rites of passage into adulthood is presented. The protagonist in Munro's story, unidentified by a name, goes through an extreme and radical initiation into adulthood, similar to that of her younger brother. Munro proposes that gender stereotyping, relationships, and a loss of innocence play an extreme, and often-controversial role in the growing and passing into adulthood for many young ch ...
    Related: men and women, rites of passage, gender stereotypes, radical, fantasy
  • Browning Monologues - 1,111 words
    Browning Monologues Consider the range of characterisation in Browning's dramatic monologues and the poetic methods he employs to portray his speakers. Some are written in rhyming verse, use metaphors, et cetera, but for what reason? What is the writer trying to achieve and how successful is he? Robert Browning (1812-1889) was an English poet noted for his mastery of dramatic monologue. He was born in London, the son of a wealthy clerk at the bank of England, he received scant formal education but had access to his father's large library of about 6,000 volumes. Though initially unsuccessful as a poet and financially dependent on his family until well into adulthood Browning was to become a c ...
    Related: browning, dramatic monologue, robert browning, last duchess, men and women
  • Buddhism - 1,875 words
    Buddhism I have considered myself to be a fairly religious person. I went to a Presbyterian elementary and middle school, a Christian School. At C.S. we had a religion class everyday. The difference from then and now is then we learned strictly about Christianity. I had never heard about evolution and other religions until I was in high school. I had only known that there was one God, and it was He to which we prayed. I knew that there was a heaven and a hell. The good people went to heaven and the bad to hell. In much more depth of course, but needless to say that was very naive. I had a Humanities class my sophomore year in high school. In this class we learned about all of the religions, ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana buddhism, theravada buddhism, middle school, china korea
  • Budget Cuts - 1,698 words
    Budget Cuts Id like to inform you about the great deal of budget cuts happening everyday in our public school systems. One of the hardest hit is in our arts and music departments. The battle over NEA funding and other important foundations that are set up to benefit our youths are being challenged by the government at an alarming rate. Cutbacks in our schools budget force students in these departments to go without necessary supplies that are essential in the learning process. Id also like to show you why art and music education is essential to our childrens learning process, how it allows them to grow up to be well rounded citizens, and why as a country, we need to fight to save these progr ...
    Related: budget, cuts, student achievement, public discourse, poetry
  • Cancer - 1,487 words
    Cancer Introduction According to Mollet, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Estimates for 1982 indicate that 430,000 Americans will have died of some form of cancer. If national trends continue, some fifty-three million Americans now alive will contract cancer sometime during their lifetime. Of this inverse number, approximately one-half will die of cancer despite a medical effort to cure and prevent cancer (300). Although 45 percent of the detected cases of serious cancer are curable, an increase of 5 percent in the last ten years, it is obvious that measures can be taken to increase the cure rate and also prevent onset of various cancers. Clark suggested that ...
    Related: american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, colon cancer, human cancer, lung cancer, prevent cancer
  • Cancer - 1,894 words
    ... Bibliography Of all the diseases and viruses that are known to man, no other can strike fear in so many peoples hearts, as the word cancer. What is cancer? Cancer is a new growth of tissue resulting from a continuous proliferation of abnormal cells that have the ability to invade and destroy other tissues.1 Cancer may be found in any type of cell or tissue in the human body. Cancer is not found in just humans, but also in animals and plants. Cancer cells can grow where ever normal cells grow or divide. Cancer is not one disease but many single diseases classified under one name.2 In our bodies we produce many thousands of new cells everyday. We produce these cell in order to grow until ...
    Related: american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, cancer research, cancer society, colon cancer, human cancer
  • Carl Gustav Jung - 1,811 words
    ... driving force to be a complete person! The self is the central archetype in the col lective unconscious, much as the sun us the center of the solar system. It unites the personality. When a person says he feels in harmony with himself and with the world, we can be sure that the self archetype is performing its work effectively. There are three ways how your psyche works together. One structure may compensate for the weakness of another structure, one component may oppose another component, and two or more structures may unite to form a synthesis. Compensation may be illustrated by the contrasting attitudes of extraversion and introversion. If extraversion is the dominant or superior att ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung
  • Carl Gustav Jung 18751961 Was A Son Of A Minister In Switzerland He Was Born On July 26, In The Small Village Of Kesswil On L - 1,358 words
    ... reasons for passionate attraction or aversion. So, for example, if I always thought that women were nagging, then I would project that notion onto my wife, and think that she is nagging, although she is perfectly customary. If he experience a "passionate attraction," then the woman undoubtedly has the same traits as his anima-image of woman. Western civilization seems to place a high value on conformity and to disparage femininity in men and masculinity in women. The disparagement beings in childhood when "sissies" and "tomboys" are ridiculed. Peter was expected to be kind and gentle, which would bring derision. Boys are simply expected to conform to a culturally specified masculine role ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung, minister, switzerland
  • Catcher In The Rye - 941 words
    Catcher In The Rye Often in literature characters, through different experiences, undergo changes which enable them to grow. In the novel The Catcher in the Rye, the author J.D. Salinger portrays Holden as a confused adolecent. The author conveys Holdens inner growth through specific incidents. When Holden is expelled from Pencey he grows and developes a new attitude towards his family. After meeting with a prostitute Holden becomes more mature when he realizes that sex does not fill the gaps of lonliness. Finally when Holden is reunited with his sister Phoebe he realizes that the innocence of children can not be preserved forever. Holden experienced inner growth after he is expelled from Pe ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, turning point, before marriage
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,540 words
    Catcher In The Rye In the novel, Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden, has very definite views on sexuality, aggression, and death. He is ambivalent towards sex, loathsome of aggression, and fearsome of death. It's this triangle of sin that demonstrates the conflict occurring within Holden's inner monologue. In the novel, Generation X, the main character, Andy, is grappling with many of the same problems that Holden faced forty years earlier. Even though the more modern society is different than forty years ago, the same general issues still haunt Andy today, with many parallels to Holden's coming-of-age issues. With such a dead-end vision of the trap of adulthood and marriage, it ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, female characters, identity crisis, teenage
  • Catcher In The Rye Character Analysis Of Holden - 1,987 words
    Catcher in the Rye - Character Analysis of Holden Ever since its publication in 1951, J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye has served as a firestorm for controversy and debate. Critics have argued the moral issues raised by the book and the context in which it is presented. Some have argued that Salinger's tale of the human condition is fascinating and enlightening, yet incredibly depressing. The psychological battles of the novel's main character, Holden Caulfield, serve as the basis for critical argument. Caulfield's self-destruction over a period of days forces one to contemplate society's attitude toward the human condition. Salinger's portrayal of Holden, which includes incidents of d ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, character analysis, holden, holden caulfield, main character, the catcher in the rye
  • Catcher In The Rye Character Analysis Of Holden - 2,065 words
    ... tors, both commenting on the problems of their times, and both novels have been recurrently banned or restricted (Davis 318). John Aldrige remarked that both novels are "study in the spiritual picaresque, the joinery that for the young is all one way, from holy innocence to such knowledge as the world offers, from the reality which illusion demands and thinks it sees to the illusion which reality insists, at the point of madness, we settle for" (129). Harvey Breit of The Atlantic Bookshelf wrote of Holden Caulfield: "(He) struck me as an urban, a transplanted Huck Finn. He has a colloquialism as marked as Huck's . . . Like Huck, Holden is neither comical or misanthrope. He is an observer ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, character analysis, character study, holden, holden caulfield, main character
  • 301 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • >>>