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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: bulgarian

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  • The Bulgarian And Soviet Virus Factories - 4,622 words
    The Bulgarian and Soviet Virus Factories The Bulgarian and Soviet Virus Factories ======================================== Vesselin Bontchev, Director Laboratory of Computer Virology Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria 0) Abstract =========== It is now well known that Bulgaria is leader in computer virus production and the USSR is following closely. This paper tries to answer the main questions: Who makes viruses there, What viruses are made, and Why this is done. It also underlines the impact of this process on the West, as well as on the national software industry. 1) How the story began ====================== Just three years ago there were no computer viruses in Bulgaria. Afte ...
    Related: bulgarian, computer virus, soviet, soviet union, virus, virus protection
  • The Bulgarian And Soviet Virus Factories - 4,639 words
    ... them with a debugger (YANKEE DOODLE) both are viruses, made in our country. - Hiding the true file length usually causes problems, because CHKDSK is able to detect the difference between the disk space marked as used in the FAT and the reported file length. Only two Bulgarian viruses in the world are able to handle this problem --- DIAMOND and V2100. - The first really "stealth" file infector --- the 512 virus was Bulgarian. It is true however, that the idea has been discovered independently almost at the same time in other parts of the world (the 4096 virus from Israel). - The only known stealth parasitic virus, which "stealthy" features go down to the BIOS level (i.e., it cannot be det ...
    Related: bulgarian, computer virus, soviet, soviet union, virus, virus protection
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,272 words
    Analysis On Bulgaria External historical events often changed Bulgaria's national boundaries in its first century of existence, natural terrain features defined most boundaries after 1944, and no significant group of people suffered serious economic hardship because of border delineation. Postwar Bulgaria contained a large percentage of the ethnic Bulgarian people, although numerous migrations into and out of Bulgaria occurred at various times. None of the country's borders was officially disputed in 1991, although nationalist Bulgarians continued to claim that Bulgaria's share of Macedonia--which it shared with both Yugoslavia and Greece--was less than just because of the ethnic connection ...
    Related: bulgaria, district court, separation of church and state, public transportation, music
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,369 words
    ... rry out economic and other activities to satisfy their interests, by mutual aid and co-operation. A co-operative is a legal entity and is deemed a merchant under the Commerce Act. Co-operative members can only be individuals, at least 7 in number. To participate in a co-operative, foreign person should have permanent residence in Bulgaria. Sole Trader - any capable individual, residing in the country, can register as a sole trader. State Companies - they exist under the forms of one-member private limited or joint-stock companies where the quotas/shares are solely owned by the State. These forms of business are established to facilitate the process of privatization of the state companies ...
    Related: bulgaria, special forces, living standards, political parties, branch
  • Andy Warhols Impact On Art - 1,584 words
    ... ly he got out of the subways and started showing his work. Also like Basquait, there are certain things that remain prevalent in all of his work. For example, the radiant baby and barking dog are repeated and perfected. Keith Haring's style, like so many others from the Pop era, has been copied over and over. The most recent duplication was perhaps by the automobile conglomerate Honda for a commercial promoting one of their vehicles. Regardless, Keith Haring had a uniqueness and productivity that eventually became planted in the world psyche. Another artist that frequented the Factory was Kenny Scharf. Kenny Scharf was also briefly a graffiti artist. He, however, grew tired of this and m ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, on the road, jack kerouac, cloth
  • Arms And The Man - 1,251 words
    Arms And The Man Arms and the Man is one of George Bernard Shaws successfully written plays that have become predominant and globally renowned. Shaws play leads itself to two themes that people can relate to, which are the importance of war and the essentials to true love and marriage. These themes are interwoven, for Shaw believed that while war is evil and stupid, and marriage desirable and good, both had become wrapped in romantic illusions which led to disastrous wars and also to unhappy marriages.1 The theme of war applies itself into the plot within the first few pages of the melodrama, when the Bulgarians are at war with the Serbs. Romance is portrayed by the humorous and ironic relat ...
    Related: common sense, true love, young woman, impose, cars
  • Candide A Contrast To Optimism - 1,204 words
    Candide - A Contrast to Optimism Francois Marie Arouet de Voltaire was the French author of the novella Candide, also known as "Optimism"(Durant and Durant 724). In Candide, Voltaire sought to point out the fallacy of Gottfried William von Leibniz's theory of optimism and the hardships brought on by the resulting inaction toward the evils of the world. Voltaire's use of satire, and its techniques of exaggeration and contrast highlight the evil and brutality of war and the world in general when men are meekly accepting of their fate. Leibniz, a German philosopher and mathematician of Voltaire's time, developed the idea that the world they were living in at that time was "the best of all possi ...
    Related: candide, contrast, optimism, works cited, young girl
  • Candide: A Critical Analysis - 425 words
    Candide: A Critical Analysis Defining optimism and redefining the philosophies of the fictional Pangloss and the non-fictional Leibniz, Candid embarks on a mishap journey. From the very onset, Voltaire begins stabbing with satire, particularly at religion. Candide, which has been credited the base for the book and movie Forrest Gump, features a main character teeming with naivet. Pangloss says all is for the better and Candide lives by this edict with unaltered optimism. Faced with death and fatigue, Candide is befriended only to be enlisted in the Bulgarian army. Escaping death a few more times, he sees the pains of war and masks the pain with philosophy. Sails are set for Portugal and Jame ...
    Related: critical, critical analysis, forrest gump, christian doctrine, fictional
  • Communism East Europe - 2,955 words
    ... a contributing factor to the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. If a party has not got the support of a majority, then it has a weak political basis. The fact that undemocratic means were used to ensure that the communists came to, and then maintained, power shows that communism was a political failure. Throughout the history of communism in Russia, never once did the party gain a majority support or truly succeed in suppressing public demonstrations of antipathy towards communism. It can therefore be argued that a political leadership with no political basis or support could ever hope to survive. Another important factor to note is communisms utter failure in relation to society a ...
    Related: century europe, communism, east europe, east european, east german, east germany, eastern europe
  • Great War - 1,179 words
    ... bia. The front remained inactive until October 1915 After Bulgaria declared war on Serbia on October 14, 1915, the Allied troops advanced into Serbia. The Bulgarian troops defeated Serbian forces in Serbia and also the British and French troops. Also in anticipation of the Bulgarian declaration of war on October 6 a strong Austro-German drive was launched from Austria-Hungary into Serbia. By the end of 1915 the Central Powers had conquered all of Serbia and eliminated the Serbian army. The British and French troops in Serbia retreated fortified and where they were held in waited for later action. The eastern front the plans of the Russians assumed the offensive at the very beginning of t ...
    Related: great britain, world war i, british forces, president wilson, offensive
  • Macedonia: The Critical Five Years: 19451950 - 882 words
    Macedonia: The Critical Five Years: 1945-1950 The critical five years: 1945-1950 Nonetheless the Slavo-Macedonians, with the backing of the newlyformed Tito regime in Yugoslavia, kept up their efforts. Just a few days after the Varkiza agreement, Slavo-Macedonian emigres from Greece formed, in Skopje, an Organisation named NOF (National Liberation Front) and sent armed guerrilla bands back to the border areas of Greek Macedonia. The activities of these bands attracted the criticism of the KKE, since it was in conflict with the terms of the Varkiza agreement and gave the government forces an excuse for applying severe measures to suppress them. However, when the Civil War began in 1946, the S ...
    Related: critical, soviet invasion, soviet union, armed conflict, pact
  • Mrs Pollifax - 598 words
    Mrs. Pollifax The Elusive Mrs. Pollifax is one of my favorite books of all times! An old, brittle woman in the CIA has to sneak eight forged passports into Bulgaria, and get out as fast as possible without being suspicious. But even before this fairly easy assignment starts, trouble begins to arise.Before she had ever touched the airplane, she met a group of young people leaving to Bulgaria too. She began to talk to a young man by the name of Philip Trenda, who was noticeably upset that a man by the name of Nikki had forced him into going. After their chat, Mrs.Pollifax and the group loaded the plane. On the way to Sofia, Bulgaria, the airplane made a special stop for General Ignatov to get ...
    Related: young people, good news, book reports, driving, chief
  • The Balkan Troubles - 845 words
    The Balkan Troubles I. Introduction Print section Balkan Wars, two consecutive wars fought from 1912 to 1913 among the countries of the Balkan Peninsula for possession of European territories held by the Ottoman Empire. The Balkan Wars severely damaged European alliances and helped kindle the volatile conditions that led to the outbreak of World War I (1914-1918). II. Background Print section At the close of the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1878, the Treaty of Berlin, signed on July 13, 1878, provided for an autonomous principality of Bulgaria. The remaining Bulgarian province, called Eastern Rumelia, was placed under the control of the Ottoman Turks. In 1885 a revolution broke out in Eastern R ...
    Related: balkan states, balkan wars, aegean sea, aegean islands, tension
  • The Cold War - 1,286 words
    ... en equipment was out of order. "From an intelligence point of view, the original cover story seemed to be particularly inept... A cover story has certain requirements. It must be credible. It must be a story that can be maintained [no live pilots knocking about] and it should not have too much detail. Anything that's missing in a cover story can be taken care of by saying the matter is being investigated."6 The further lies the State Department released about the incident only strained U.S. and Soviet relations. These included reports of an unarmed weather research plane, piloted by a civilian, that had trouble with oxygen equipment going down over the Soviet Union. Under questioning by ...
    Related: cold war, armed forces, president eisenhower, information officer, spies
  • The Successes And Failures Of The League Of Nations In The 1920s - 635 words
    The Successes And Failures Of The League Of Nations In The 1920S This isn't really an essay, its just a summary of the actions of the League of Nations that might come in handy if you have no notes. The Successes and Failures of the League of Nations in the 1920s Extracts from the Covenant of the League: To promote international co-operation and to achieved international peace and security: -by the acceptance of obligations not to resort to war -by the prescription of open, just and honourable relations between nations. -by the firm establishment of international law as the rule of conduct between governments. -by the maintenance of justice and a scrupulous respect for all treaty obligations ...
    Related: league, league of nations, successes, communist russia, great powers
  • United Nations - 3,616 words
    ... ce negotiations began in October 1918,United States president Woodrow Wilson insisted that his Fourteen Points serve as a basis for the signing of the Armistice . The Armistice included the formation of the League of Nations (here after refereed to as the League). And as the years went by the League grew to be a formidable organization. It's goals and objectives were precise, they were to attain and maintain world peace. By 1935 the League had declined severely. And In 1945 the League ended and the United Nations (referred to as the UN) took its place. There were a lot of similarities between the two organizations, however the differences were apparent as well. Scholars have tried to asc ...
    Related: league of nations, united nations, united states president, people's republic of china, men and women
  • Voltaires Candide - 1,917 words
    Voltaire's Candide VOLTAIRES CANDIDE The beginning of the 17th century marked many changes for Europe. These changes were both physical and philosophical in nature. Common citizens were tired of being abused, mistreated and most of all labeled as peasants and commoners by the aristocracy. They were fed up with the hypocrisy of the church and the abuse of power by its leaders in the name of God. One man stood tall above the rest. Francois Marie Arouet was born November 21, 1694 to a middle class family in Paris. At that time, Louis the XIV was king of France and the overwhelming majority lived in harsh conditions. The aristocracy of France ruled with an iron fist and poverty was widespread th ...
    Related: candide, social inequality, middle ages, king of france, mockery
  • Why Did Both Hungary In 1956 And Czechoslovakia In 1968 Rebel Against Soviet Domination - 1,200 words
    Why did both Hungary in 1956 and Czechoslovakia in 1968 rebel against Soviet Domination? Why did both Hungary in 1956 and Czechoslovakia in 1968 rebel against Soviet Domination? The causes for such a massive and all-captivating rebellion, which occurred both in Hungary (1956) and in Czechoslovakia (1968), originated most from deep-rooted antagonism towards Soviet domination in the Eastern Europe in the post-war era. A continuous political and cultural suppression by Soviet dictatorial policies, obviously linked with economic constraints, coalesced to provoke robust insurrections. Short-term reasons are of no less importance in the analysis of these events. In the case of Hungary, Khrushchevs ...
    Related: czechoslovakia, domination, hungary, rebel, soviet, soviet union
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