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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: budget surplus

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  • 30year Treasury Bond - 1,120 words
    30-Year Treasury Bond Once considered the linchpin of the government securities market, the United States Treasurys 30-year bond is losing its place as the credit markets bellwether as traders and investors shirt their attention to the shorter-term notes. The bond market is struggling to establish what the new benchmark is, said Ward McCarthy at Stone & McCarthy Research Associates in Princeton, NJ. The U.S. 30-year bond known as the long bond because of its the Treasury with the longest maturity was seen since 1977 as the key gauge of expectations for U.S. inflation and economic growth, and a barometer of overall borrowing rates for the federal government and corporations. Also, these bon ...
    Related: bond, treasury, treasury bonds, stock market, united states government
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,369 words
    ... rry out economic and other activities to satisfy their interests, by mutual aid and co-operation. A co-operative is a legal entity and is deemed a merchant under the Commerce Act. Co-operative members can only be individuals, at least 7 in number. To participate in a co-operative, foreign person should have permanent residence in Bulgaria. Sole Trader - any capable individual, residing in the country, can register as a sole trader. State Companies - they exist under the forms of one-member private limited or joint-stock companies where the quotas/shares are solely owned by the State. These forms of business are established to facilitate the process of privatization of the state companies ...
    Related: bulgaria, special forces, living standards, political parties, branch
  • Balanced Budget - 1,815 words
    Balanced Budget Balanced Budget Thomas Jefferson stated, I place economy among the first and most important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt (Grinsburg 1). This quote illustrates the importance of maintaining a balanced budget; therefore, it is necessary to stand firmly resolved that the government should balance its budget. Three main arguments uphold this premise. They are as follows: 1. It is feasible for the government to balance the budget, 2. A budget deficit harms the United States through creating a trade deficit and increasing the national debt, 3. A balanced budget would benefit ...
    Related: balanced budget, budget, budget deficit, budget office, budget surplus, congressional budget, federal budget
  • Budget Negotiations - 626 words
    Budget Negotiations -------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------ In the midst of the current budget negotiations, there is one neglected question worth asking: what does the public really want? Tax cuts? Paying down the national debt? More spending? If so, more spending on what? The available polling data, analyzed in this report, helps answer these questions. Does the public want to cut taxes? All else equal, of course the public wants tax cuts. But in the real world, all else is generally not equal -- cutting taxes involves giving up something else that might be done with the government's resources. When the tradeoffs are made explicit, cutting taxes doe ...
    Related: budget, budget surplus, york times, real world, shore
  • Election Of 2000 - 1,171 words
    ... f staff, Rumsfeld made Cheney his deputy. When Rumsfeld left the White House to be defense secretary, Cheney moved up to become the youngest chief of staff ever, at age 34. He held the post for 14 months. After Ford left office, Cheney returned to Casper, Wyoming and ran for the state's single congressional seat. Despite his heart attack in the middle of the first campaign -- which he discussed with all of Wyoming's Republicans in a letter explaining why he would continue to campaign -- Cheney won decisively. He went on to win five more terms. In Congress, Cheney quickly rose within the GOP power chain. He was one of President Reagan's most ardent supporters, backing him up on defense is ...
    Related: election, stock price, prescription drugs, george w. bush, director
  • George Bush - 1,350 words
    ... Post's Governors Guide strong families, local control, individual responsibility, and limited responsibility are principles guiding Governor Bush's major initiatives. He continually states the importance of family and education in society. He says that education is his number one priority. He believes for our society to become compassionate and responsible we must first teach children to read and comprehend. According to this page he says, "Government is necessary, but not necessarily government." His staff knows that any proposal brought before him must encourage personal responsibility, local control, and fiscal responsibility. He has encouraged a voluntary clean up program for compani ...
    Related: bush, bush administration, george bush, george w. bush, president bush
  • Health Care Reform - 1,424 words
    Health Care Reform 9:15 Due to the upcoming presidential election, the two major political parties, and their candidates, have been focusing on the primary problems that the nation will face. Chief among those problems is the future of Medicare, the national health-insurance plan. Medicare was enacted in 1965, under the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson, in order to provide health insurance for retired citizens and the disabled (Ryan). The Medicare program covers most people aged 65 or older, as well as handicapped people who enroll in the program, and consists of two health plans: a hospital insurance plan (part A) and a medical insurance plan (part B) (Marmor 22). Before Medicare, many A ...
    Related: canada health, care reform, care system, financial health, health, health care, health care reform
  • Idaho Legislature 2000 Project - 1,825 words
    Idaho Legislature 2000 Project The Idaho Legislature held its first session in 1890. At that time the legislature was composed of 18 senators and 36 representatives. The state constitution was amended so each county had at least one Senator and one Representative. Currently reapportionment that occurs every 10 years determines the size of the Idaho Legislature. Until 1968 the Legislature was only in session every two years. In 1968 the Legislature shifted to annual sessions to meet more frequently to pass needed legislation and to prepare budgets that more closely suited the changing needs of state agencies. According to Idaho state law, each legislative session is to begin on the Monday clo ...
    Related: idaho, legislature, domestic violence, budget surplus, drawing
  • Presidential Election 2000 - 1,042 words
    Presidential Election 2000 As generations pass, and times change, the people of the United States change as well. What may have been a major issue in the 1980 election might not even concern voters in 2000. Economic issues are continually changing with the times. Each election develops its own "personality." Despite agreeing on some issues, the four major [now just two] candidates in the upcoming 2000 presidential election hold different opinions on three major economic issues: tax reform, health care, and free trade/immigration. One of the most important issues of the 2000 presidential election is tax reform. This topic, possibly more than any other issue in the election, reflects the great ...
    Related: election, presidential, presidential election, vice president, flat tax
  • Science And Money - 269 words
    Science And Money For years, everyone has opined on what to do with the budget surplus: fund new educational programs, cut taxes, and so on. Science needs the money. In some technologies, we are beginning to fall behind other countries. We must not allow this to happen. Everyone reaps the benefits of science; increasing funding for research programs would only enhance these benefits. Where would the United States be today without science? Science is a big part of our economy, but today most research and development occur in the private sector. Why has the government cut spending? Because they know that the private sector will do the work. Money motivates the private sector to perform researc ...
    Related: science, science research, government spending, budget surplus, surplus
  • Social Security Tax System - 1,055 words
    ... sted in 2034, Americans must invest elsewhere, in order to secure a financial stable retirement. One way to secure a financial stable retirement at a low risk investment is by securing physical property. By investing in physical property, an investor would have physical equity instead of electronic. This physical equity would create a low risk investment, even if the roof caved in on Wall Street, the investor would have something physical to lay claim too. However, a draw back to securing physical property is personal time; the investor either has to hire a property consultant/manager or become one. Another draw back to securing physical property is the fact that property markets are jus ...
    Related: retirement security, security reform, security trust fund, social security, san francisco
  • The Euro - 1,694 words
    ... t 30 percent of gross domestic product. There is still less regulation here and growth is much stronger. Small wonder, then, that European investors are fleeing the Euro in favor of dollars. The euro enjoyed a very short honeymoon after its launch in January, as its value fell steadily against the dollar and the pound. Not only has this been an embarrassment for Euroland politicians and central bankers; it also has caused some to doubt on the whole single-currency project and question whether UK entry is likely, or even desirable. There are, however, several good reasons why the current relative weakness of the euro is more of a public relations than a real economic problem for Euroland ...
    Related: euro, european community, general public, fiscal policy, oppose
  • The Politics Of Boom - 860 words
    The Politics Of Boom The Economist published an article on September 30, 2000 entitled "The Politics of Boom". This article brings up several issues that we have discussed in Economics 103 this semester. The article discusses the presidential election and both candidate's positions on some of the major issues dealing with the economy. Mainly, the article centers around the federal budget surplus and tax cuts. "This year's presidential election is being fought against the backdrop of an unprecedented economic boom". One component of this statement is the unemployment rate at about 4%, which is close to historic lows. In class, we learned that the different types of unemployment are frictiona ...
    Related: boom, economic boom, domestic product, inflation rate, historic
  • Tom Woodruff Wrote An Article, Federal Surplus 8216wish Lists Don't Add Up With Budgets Leftovers Pegged At 44 Trillio - 918 words
    Tom Woodruff wrote an article, Federal Surplus 'wish lists' don't add up. With budgets leftovers pegged at $4.4 trillions, republicans propose across the board tax cuts, while the president eyes Social Security. A compromise seems possible. Call it the new math, D.C. style. Washington politicians are struggling with a crisis that no one has experienced before. How to spend a surplus in the federal budget that is now estimated to be about $4.4 trillion over the next 15 years. That works out to be about $2500 per taxpaying unit (families and individuals) each year. With that kind of money at stake, the White House and the Republicans in Congress have set some ambitious goals. Woodruff reports ...
    Related: budget surplus, federal budget, surplus, woodruff, income tax
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