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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: adopted children

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  • Adopted Children Should Know Their Biological Parents - 563 words
    Adopted Children should Know their Biological Parents Giving birth is like pulling your lower lip over your head -Carol Lucawikz When a mother gives birth to her child it is the ultimate bonding experience. And when a mother gives her child up for adoption, it is a selfless act for the childs best interests, but not a painless one. Every parent that is involved in an adoption arrangement will wonder and worry about their child for many days of many years. Curiosity is powerful, and it is not uncommon to long to be reunited with ones own flesh and blood. Adopted children have a right to know who their biological parents are. Health reasons, curiosity, and the need to bond with family are all ...
    Related: adopted children, biological, genetic disease, family background, parent
  • Abortion And Prolife - 1,874 words
    ... before as well as after, birth" (Wilke 94). The unborn are beginning to gain more rights. From state to state, legal rights of an unborn child can mean the difference between the death of a fetus being a criminal act to being just a matter of legal consequence. Mothers are now starting to be prosecuted for harming their babies through drug and alcohol abuse. Drunk drivers are also being punished in some states for injuring fetuses. Accidents like these would have gone without punishment up until a few years ago. Almost half of the states, such as Delaware, do not consider the killing of a fetus as murder unless the child is born and then dies (USA Today). Patricia Bast Lyman added to th ...
    Related: abortion, the bible, pregnant woman, hippocratic oath, american
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 1,031 words
    Adoption And Identity Formation There has been an enormous amount of research conducted about adoptees and their problems with identity formation. Many of the researchers agree on some of the causes of identity formation problems in adolescent adoptees, while other researchers conclude that there is no significant difference in identity formation in adoptees and birth children. This paper will discuss some of the research which has been conducted and will attempt to answer the following questions: Do adoptees have identity formation difficulties during adolescence? If so, what are some of the causes of these vicissitudes? Is there a significant difference between identity formation of adopte ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity crisis, identity development, identity formation
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Babylonian Civilization - 1,516 words
    Babylonian Civilization Babylonian Civilization What was the Babylonian civilization? What was so great about this particular civilization anyways? Babylonia was a civilization that had a way of life that was so effective that it underwent relatively little change for some 1200 years. In the following essay, I will be discussing their daily life, their economy, government, the people and society, arts, and religion, to show why and how their way of life was so effective. Daily life in Babylonia was very "down-to-earth". Law and justice were key concepts in the Babylonian way of life. People did a lot of farming in this ancient civilization. Each day people would go to work for a living. The ...
    Related: babylonian, civilization, legal rights, law and justice, arranged
  • Bowlbys Deprivation - 1,480 words
    Bowlby's Deprivation In his hypothesis, Bowlby believed that an infants failure to attach to a primary caregiver would have long term effects. This essay will attempt to evaluate Bowlbys deprivation hypothesis. Firstly, the terms attachment and deprivation will be defined. Following that, a full definition of the hypothesis will be made, and then an attempt will be made to describe and understand the studies and period of history that lead to Bowlbys ideas and the influence they generated. A full evaluation will be made of his deprivation hypothesis, including detailed criticisms of his theory. Finally, conclusions will be drawn to show if Bowlbys deprivation hypothesis can still retain any ...
    Related: deprivation, world health, mental health, human behaviour, criticism
  • Childhood Obesity - 1,051 words
    Childhood Obesity In today's society childhood obesity is considered to be an epidemic. The increase in obesity is not caused by the change in the gene pool, but rather by the change in the environment. This causes vulnerable populations to express the obesity phenotype (Stune, 1999). One in seven children ages 6-17 are considered to be obese. Most nutritionists will say that this is do to the lack of parental guidance. A child's parents should teach their child proper eating habits so that they won't run across problems in the future (Tomlin, 1999). According to the article Facts about childhood Obesity and Overweightness, obese children are statistically not active, and their diets are hig ...
    Related: childhood obesity, obesity, parental guidance, diabetes mellitus, consequence
  • Dr Durand Philosophy By Reginald Moore - 1,261 words
    Dr. Durand Philosophy By Reginald Moore Reflective Essay Prepared for Dr. Durand Philosophy By Reginald Moore 213-94-2165 Reflective Essay What makes up a good family? Does your family communicate well? These are the questions that many people in America ask. They battle with these questions everyday when they think about the way their family acts. I have also battle with these questions especially when it comes to my family. My family is one of uniqueness, which causes lots of conflicts. I battle an individualistic sister, a communitarian mother, and a civic republican brother. With all these different personalities in the house it is no wonder it seems like our house is a lifestyle enclave ...
    Related: moore, philosophy, school teacher, politics and government, caring
  • Employee Benefits Required By Law - 3,418 words
    Employee Benefits Required by Law Employee Benefits Required by Law The legally required employee benefits constitute nearly a quarter of the benefits package that employers provide. These benefits include employer contributions to Social Security, unemployment insurance, and workers compensation insurance. Altogether such benefits represent about twenty-one and half percent of payroll costs. Social Security Social Security is the federally administered insurance system. Under current federal laws, both employer and employee must pay into the system, and a certain percentage of the employees salary is paid up to a maximum limit. Social Security is mandatory for employees and employers. The m ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, security benefits, working women, federal government
  • Intelligence: Genetic And Environmental Factors - 1,936 words
    Intelligence: Genetic And Environmental Factors Intelligence: Genetic and Environmental Factors One of the most interesting and controversial areas in behavioral genetics, human intelligence is currently assumed to be subject to both genetic and environmental influences. While this assumption is accepted by a majority of geneticists and behavioral scientists, there is great disagreement on the degree of influence each contributes. Arguments for environmental influences are compelling; at the same time there is growing evidence that genetic influence on intelligence is significant and substantial (Eyesenck, 1998; Mackintosh, 1998; Plomin, 1994; Steen, 1996). The purpose of this paper is to ex ...
    Related: environmental, environmental factors, environmental influences, factor analysis, factor theory, genetic
  • International Adoption - 1,615 words
    International Adoption International Adoption There are many reasons as to why people choose to adopt a child. Sometimes it has to do with infertility and couples decide to adopt children because, I could not have biological children and I do not believe in some methods of fertility treatments (Carney), but there are other reasons too. According to Christine Adamec, some people think that it is better to adopt than to bring another child into the world. Others do not want to pass a certain genetic problem onto other generations, and some have medical problems that would make the pregnancy more difficult than usual, or even harmful to the mothers health. These types of adoptive parents are ca ...
    Related: adoption, family problems, birth control, medical care, homosexual
  • Josephine Baker - 1,442 words
    ... circles. Varna produced the show Paris qui Remue, which featured Baker singing in French and wearing glamorous costumes. By the end of the 1930's, "she ventured outside the music hall into two other professional areas. One was a motion picture . . . and the other . . . was light opera."# Baker starred in two films, Zou-Zou, the story of a laundress who becomes a music hall star, and Princesse Tam-Tam. Jacques Offenbach's operetta La Creole, a light opera about a Jamaican girl, was Ms. Baker's most challenging role thus far. It opened at Theatre Marigny in Paris on December 15, 1934, and had a successful run for six months. In 1935, Baker decided she wanted to return to the United States. ...
    Related: baker, josephine, lincoln memorial, wonderful world, american
  • Korean Immigrants In America - 1,412 words
    ... hich is still the "melting pot" of the world.Before the World War II era, the smallest Asian community to settle in the United States of America was the Korean American community. Between 1903 and 1905, immigration records show some seven thousand Koreans migrated to Hawaii. Hawaii had been annexed to the United States in 1898 and organized as a territory in 1900 A fraction of those immigrants came to the mainland. After 1905, sizable. Korean emigration was all but stopped by Japanese overlords. Tens of thousands of Koreans then went or were brought to Japan, but their descendants are still not granted citizenship and other human rights. The early Korean American community differed from ...
    Related: america, korean, korean war, north korean, south korean, united states of america
  • Racial Difference In Intelligence - 1,747 words
    ... ype. In The Fallacy of I.Q., Senna explains that from conception on, the genotype is modified by environmental factors. Thus, an individual's genetic potential is always being expressed though behavior acquired in a social and cultural setting, his phenotype. A person's performance on an "intelligence" test is phenotypic behavior. In accordance with this "phenotypic" factor, transracial adoption studies provide evidence against the heritability of racial differences in IQ. For example, in the well known Minnesota Adoption Study, by age 17, adopted children with two White biological parents had an average IQ of 106, adopted children with one White and one Black biological parent had an av ...
    Related: intelligence, intelligence test, racial, international journal, issues raised
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