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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: british literature

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  • Herois Tradition Throughout British Literature - 1,875 words
    Herois Tradition Throughout British Literature Throughout British Literature, there are many instances of heroism. To be considered a hero by others in the time period of 449 to 1625, you must be, "noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose: especially, one who has risked or sacrificed his life" (Morris 618). Four characters in British Literature that portray heroic traits are Beowulf, Sir Gawain, Macbeth, and the Knight of The Canterbury Tales. Beowulf shows himself worthy of the title of being a hero when he leaves his country to help a neighboring country, Denmark and rid them of the long lasting fear of a malicious monster known as Grendel. Sir Gawain is considered a hero by many ...
    Related: british, british literature, literature, grendel's mother, american heritage
  • Subject British Literature - 496 words
    subject = British Literature title = A Critical Analysis of King Leer's Daughters'Attraction to Edmund. Shakespeare King Lear is a story of treachery and deceit. The villainy of the play knows no bounds. Family lines are ignored in an overwhelming quest for power. This villainy is epitomized in the character of Edmund, bastard son of the Earl of Gloucester. Edmund is displayed as a " most toad-spotted traitor." When we first see Edmund, he is already knee deep in treachery. His need for power has already clouded his mind to the extent that his first act is a double- cross of his own brother. Edmund composes a false letter to his father implicating his brother, Edgar in a plot to kill Glouces ...
    Related: british, british literature, literature, critical analysis, earl of gloucester
  • Barbaulds Prophecy And Blakes Imagination - 1,136 words
    Barbauld's Prophecy And Blake's Imagination Barbauld's Prophecy and Blake's Imagination The Romantic Era was a time of widespread cultural, social, and political reform. Industrialization was taking the place of the agrarian lifestyle, which introduced problems such as higher poverty, a larger segregation of class, and overworking of both adults and children. The wars in America and France paved the way for political upheaval by introducing new ways of thinking and radicals who wanted change. With all of this turmoil and chaos many writers turned to escapism, which involved both imagination, and prophecy. Imagination and prophecy are merely two ways the writers of this time thought, hence, b ...
    Related: imagination, prophecy, william blake, works cited, western world
  • Blakes Songs Of Innocence And Experience Analysis - 701 words
    Blake's Songs Of Innocence And Experience Analysis In William Blakes Songs of Innocence and Experience, the gentle lamb and the dire tiger define childhood by setting a contrast between the innocence of youth and the experience of age. The Lamb is written with childish repetitions and a selection of words which could satisfy any audience under the age of five. Blake applies the lamb in representation of youthful immaculateness. The Tyger is hard-featured in comparison to The Lamb, in respect to word choice and representation. The Tyger is a poem in which the author makes many inquiries, almost chantlike in their reiterations. The question at hand: could the same creator have made both the ti ...
    Related: innocence, songs, william blake, wesley longman, little lamb
  • Israfel By Poe - 1,679 words
    Israfel By Poe Israfel: An Analysis Israfel is a mesmerizing poem, the beginning of which was first set down by Poe during his days at West Point College.(Allen 233) The poem itself is a direct contrast to Poe's usual poetry, which usually deal with death and dark thoughts or other melancholy, Gothic ideas. Poe's idea of the death of beautiful woman being the most poetical of all topics is here, nowhere to be found. This proves that Poe, when so inclined, could indeed write about something other than opium induced nightmares and paranoid grieving men who are frightened to death by sarcastic,talkative, ravens. Besides Israfel, Poe's other poetry, To Helen, as well as Annabel Lee and others, a ...
    Related: islamic faith, free spirit, greek mythology, mystical, artists
  • Jason Leite - 1,028 words
    Jason Leite Jason Leite British Literature II Dr. Marck Critical Essay #2 Even though certain works are designated to certain periods in time, many works from say, the Victorian period have similar controlling images when compared to works from the Twentieth century. Each writer presents an image that is repeatedly used throughout the work. The same image is used in each work even though they were written during different periods in time. Sometimes, even the location of the image, where it was placed in the text, helps to develop the image within the work. It may be used to convey the writer's opinion on the subject but a lot of images are familiar and carry over from generation to generatio ...
    Related: jason, world politics, william butler yeats, william butler, imply
  • Oroonokos Slavery Problem: An Interpretation - 1,912 words
    Oroonoko's Slavery Problem: An Interpretation Aphra Behn's seventeenth century tale of a noble African prince's tragic fall to slavery, Oroonoko, has often been cited as a major antislavery work. Under close examination, however, Oroonoko tells a more complex story. The volatile cultural, moral, and religious crosscurrents that Behn finds surrounding her manifest themselves in the forms of narrative equivocality and intermittent satire in Oroonoko. Throughout the text, she seemingly possesses a conflicting attitude toward the slavery institution and racism in general. On one hand, her portrayal of the protagonist Oroonoko is just, heroic, and deeply sympathetic, and she often disparages Euro ...
    Related: interpretation, slavery, british literature, personal story, laughing
  • Phillis Wheatley, One Of America's Most Profound Writers, Has Contributed Greatly To American Literature, Not Only As A Wr - 1,647 words
    Phillis Wheatley, one of America's most profound writers, has contributed greatly to American literature, not only as a writer, but as an African American woman, who has influenced many African Americans by enriching their knowledge of and exposure to their Negro heritage and Negro literature. As one of America's most renown writers, Wheatley, said to be the mother of African American Literature, is best known for her sympathetic portrayals of African American thought. Wheatley's literary contributions are vast in nature and distinguish her apart from most writers of her era. Her writings have helped in the molding of the African American tradition and are favored by people of all ethnic bac ...
    Related: african american, african american history, african american literature, american, american freedom, american heritage, american history
  • Sam Bertolami - 352 words
    Sam Bertolami British Literature 4th Period 8-10-00 When I accepted the position of Secretary of Education I was asked to design and create an education system that is works. Unfortunately it is my belief that no one person can create a fully functional system of education. The problem with the current educational system is not the teachers, principals, supplies, or budgets [Though the latter two create problems unique to the situation]. The problem with the current education system, and all education systems, proposed or previous, are the students. A handful of unmotivated students, say 5 in a class of 20, can greatly decrease the measure the amount the other 15 motivated students learn in ...
    Related: educational system, british literature, education system, bright, seemingly
  • Symbolism Of The Ring In Jrr Tolkiens The Lord Of The Rings - 2,272 words
    Symbolism of the Ring in JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings Symbolism of the Ring: The Embodiment of Evil "One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the Darkness bind them" (1 LotR II,2 The Council of Elrond) One of the masters of British Literature, John Ronald Reuel Tolkien has the unique ability to create a fantasy world in which exists a nearly endless supply of parallelisms to reality. By mastering his own world and his own language and becoming one with his fantasy, Tolkien is able to create wonderful symbolism and meaning out of what would otherwise be considered nonsense. Thus, when one decides to study The Ruling Ring, or The One Ring, in T ...
    Related: lord of the rings, ring, symbolism, northern europe, norse mythology
  • The Cantebury Tails What Are Those A Story Perhaps A Poem Who Really Knows - 358 words
    The Cantebury Tails? What are those? A story? Perhaps a poem? Who really knows? If anyone is a book worm, likes British Literature, or just happens to be in the Junior English class at St. Bede Academy, all know what The Cantebury Tails is. The Cantebury Tails is a poem written by Chaucer. In this poem he plays with the words to make them sound like the characters are really not what they seem. The poem is about a group that all meet at an inn. The innkeeper says that he will allow them what they want as long as he can go with the group and that everyone tells two tails on the way up and two on the way back. This is the basis of the poem. An incident recently occurred involving high school s ...
    Related: poem, the wife of bath, wife of bath, british literature, reeve
  • The Mysteries Of The Sonnets Vargo 1 - 1,715 words
    The Mysteries of the Sonnets Vargo 1 William Shakespeares sonnets may have been the best poetry ever written. The sonnets are beautifully written with many different feelings expressed in them. Although they may have been the most autobiographically written poems of all time, they still present a number of questions. Many Elizabethan historians and Shakespeare enthusiasts often wonder who Shakespeare was writing about when he wrote the sonnets. There are three main questions which come to mind when one is reading the sonnets. The mysterious dark lady, Mr. W. H., and the young man that Shakespeare wrote of are three of the sonnet mysteries. Although William Shakespeare did not write the sonne ...
    Related: sonnets, british literature, william shakespeare, york harper, sarah
  • William Shakespeare - 1,111 words
    William Shakespeare Even after four centuries, the literary world remains to uphold Shakespeare as the greatest genius in British literature. While best known as a dramatist, Shakespeare was also a distinguished poet. Shakespeare's extraordinary gifts for complex poetic imagery, mixed metaphor, and intelligent puns, along with insight into human nature are the characteristics that created the legend he is today. The following essay will address how Shakespeare contributed to modern playwright, the point in time when Shakespeare wrote some of his great plays, which was the Elizabethan era, and the beginning of his acting and playwright career, had influences with William Shakespeare. When you ...
    Related: shakespeare, william shakespeare, henry vi, christopher marlowe, monarchy
  • William Wordsworths Poem - 901 words
    William WordsworthS Poem The world is too much with us by William Wordsworth William Wordsworth's poem The world is too much with us is a statement about conflict between nature and humanity. The symbolism in his poem illustrates a sense of the conviction and deep feelings Wordsworth had toward nature. He longs for a much simpler time when the progress of humanity was tempered by the restriction nature imposed. Wordsworth is saying in this poem that man is wasting his time on earth by not appreciating nature around him. He is looking but not beholding. "We have given our hearts away" (4) means that we have sold the part of us that is from the earth (man which is from dust) in order to make o ...
    Related: poem, william wordsworth, british literature, mother nature, symbolism
  • Wollstonecraft And Dickens: Fight For Educational Reform - 1,172 words
    ... there. Norrie Epstein, in The Friendly Dickens, states that, "utilitarianism professes function over feeling, facts over fancy". Mr. McChoakumchild, who is brilliantly named (choak-um-child), is not seen in action but we get a good description of him. He is supposed to represent the ordinary teacher who had gone of to school and been stuffed with facts of all kinds but never asked to really think about them, only regurgitate the information. We see no signs of actual humanity in this man; he is the model teacher for Utilitarianism, and, in fact, we get the idea that if he werent as learned as he was that he may actually have some humanity. Next, we see Tom Gradgrinds own children Louisa ...
    Related: educational, educational reform, educational system, mary wollstonecraft, reform, wollstonecraft
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