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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: british isles

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  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • Amelia Earhart - 1,195 words
    Amelia Earhart Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897 in Atchison, Kansas. She was the daughter of a railroad attorney and had a younger sister named Muriel. Amelia was a tomboy and was always interested in learning. She was educated at Columbia University and Harvard Summer School. She taught English to immigrant factory workers. During World War I, Amelia was a volunteer in a Red Cross hospital. Amelia heard of a woman pilot, Neta Snook, who gave flying lessons. She had her first lesson on January 2, 1921. On July 24, 1921, Amelia bought her first plane, a prototype of the Kinner airplane and named it "The Canary." In 1928, she accepted the invitation of the American pilots Wilmer S ...
    Related: amelia, amelia earhart, earhart, los angeles, physical evidence
  • Battle Of Britain - 1,285 words
    Battle Of Britain Battle of Britain Dunkirk-May 1940 In May of 1940 German forces invaded France. By the end of May Allied troops were cornered, on the coast, in the town of Dunkirk. They had been overpowered by the German blitzkrieg(Battle of Britain).Though German bombers had destroyed over 200 of the rescue armadas ships, the British still were able to evacuate 224,000 of their troops along with 123,00 French(Mosley 20). Though they had been forced to abandon most of their equipment and supplies on the beach, the British avoided the trap set by the Germans. This event was the precursor to the Battle of Britain. At this point, Germany felt that Allied forces were weak and if they were to i ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, great britain, highly effective, royal navy
  • Britain And Europe In The Seventeenth Century - 1,595 words
    Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century J.R. Jones, a Professor of English History in the School of English Studies at the University of East Anglia, England, in Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century, has written a very informative and interesting book. Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century is a relatively short book that deals with the impact that Britain had on European affairs at the beginning of the seventeenth century. The thesis is basically summed up in the title of the book. To expand on the thesis, Dr. Jones emphasizes the close interdependence of Britain and Europe in the seventeenth century, and shows that events ...
    Related: britain, seventeenth, seventeenth century, world affairs, english revolution
  • British In 19th - 1,840 words
    British In 19th The nineteenth (19th) century was a period of great change and accompanying social unrest in the British Isles. Most outstanding among the changes was the industrial revolution. As everything in life, it brought good, but it also brought evil. The industrial revolution combined with the expansion of the British Empire made the United Kingdom, the richest and most powerful country in the world. Some of the islanders became unbelievably wealthy, but others, unfortunately, became unbelievably poor. Writers from this historical period cognizant of the human suffering, became social critics of what was taking place in England, of how the rich and powerful became more oppressive th ...
    Related: british, british empire, british isles, british society, united kingdom
  • Changes In Amazon - 592 words
    Changes In Amazon During the past several decades, changes in the global climatic pattern has become evident and has attracted much attention from both the general public and the professional environmental organizations. Deforestation is one of the main reasons for these known changes. One of the reasons that cause the disappearing of the Amazon rainforest is industrial logging, which is the single largest problem. Other problems that also contribute to the disappearing of the Amazon forests include road construction, cattle ranching, and the production of wood products, all of which are important factors to be considered. The Amazon rainforest is the world's largest rain forest today, which ...
    Related: amazon, amazon rainforest, jean paul, south american, meat
  • Coastal Erosion - 1,484 words
    Coastal Erosion Coastal Erosion With Reference to examples discuss the view that coastal erosion is caused by human intervention as a posed to natural processes. For many decades the approach to rapid coastal erosion was to build up sea defences, to try and slow down or even stop the erosion. Initially the attempts were thought a success, however after some years it was realised that the power of the sea and waves could overcome human attempts. Only could protection be a success if huge costs were going to be involved. Many methods around the British Isles have taken place in he last 50 years with many failures occurring. It is very rare to find a coastline that shows a decrease in the rate ...
    Related: coastal, erosion, natural process, good news, wave
  • Commercial Warfare - 816 words
    Commercial Warfare In the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, continuing through Madison's term, the United States initiated a policy to retaliate against the seizure of ships by the British and French. These three dominant nations entered a period between 1806-1810, known as Commercial Warfare. The Commercial War was a response by Americans to maintain their right of neutral commerce. The Acts by the United States, the Decrees by the powerful Napoleon I, and the Parliamentary orders, throughout the period of Commercial Warfare directly led to the start of the War of 1812, and helped build the commercial future of the United States. The Peace of Amiens did not last long after it's signing on Mar ...
    Related: commercial, warfare, united states trade, war of 1812, america
  • Darwinism - 214 words
    Darwinism Darwin doesn't work here any more Richard Milton spent some twenty years studying the geology and palaeontology of the British Isles before writing Shattering the Myths of Darwinism. It was the absence of transitional fossilsthat first made me question Darwin's idea of gradual change. I realised, too, that the procedures used to date rocks were circular.Rocks are used to date fossils: fossils are used to date rocks. From here I began to think the unthinkable: could Darwinism be scientifically flawed? I became an almost daily visitor at the Natural History Museum, looking more closely again at all the famous evidence I had been taught about:the evolution of horses, Archaeopteryx -- ...
    Related: darwinism, natural history, human sexuality, british isles, stone
  • Early History Of The Celts - 1,970 words
    Early History Of The Celts INTRODUCTION The Ancient Celts were not an illiterate people, but they transferred their knowledge orally. They had an alphabet of twenty letters called Ogham. Each letter was named after a tree from the land where they lived. Ogham was used on standing stones, primarily on graves and boundary markers. The primary sources of information about the Celts are, in that light, the texts written by the Romans who were in touch with them and Christian monks, who lived in Irish monasteries in the Middle Ages. Caesar, Livy and Tacitus, wrote about their contemporaries who lived in a way different than themselves and therefore were considered barbarians, but even though they ...
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  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
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  • Execution Charles I Speedy Settlement - 1,154 words
    Execution Charles I - Speedy Settlement? WHY WAS THE EXECUTION OF THE KING NOT FOLLOWED BY A SPEEDY SETTLEMENT? How do you replace a King? Can you even attempt to do so at all? The same problems that had led Parliament to dither over removing him initially would still exist after his death. To replace the monarch would be difficult, nobody was sure what they wanted, let alone if they desired a new monarch, nor did they want to make more a martyr of Charles as they had done so already. A decision needed to please everyone unconditionally. The problem lies in that it is incredibly difficult to please every party. In a balance of power, one nation's accomplishments can only come at the demise o ...
    Related: charles i, charles ii, execution, settlement, speedy
  • Famouse People Of Civil War - 1,160 words
    ... ng marches. In late 1864 he spread out his men 50 miles wide and attacked the Confederacy on the unprotected Georgia countryside. It resulted in the capture of Savannah. In 1881 Sherman established the famous school at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and he died in 1891. Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglass was born a slave in Maryland in 1817. In 1838 he obtained seaman's papers from a free black and escaped to New Bedford. In 1841 he joined the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. With Douglass's great speeches, people didn't believe that he used to be a slave. Douglass wrote a book called Life and Times of Frederick Douglass to tell people about his life when he was a slave. After 2 years o ...
    Related: black people, causes of the civil war, civil war, united states civil, mississippi river
  • Frankenstein - 1,449 words
    ... reate another human being brought only misfortune and misery into his life, as if he was being punished for his attempt on divinity, thus displaying the message of the inauspicious consequences of striving to rival the heavens. The second theme imbedded into the novel is concerned with the acceptance of responsibility. This message proclaims that one must abide by the effects of his or her actions. One who flees or denies the results of his or her behavior will surely be plagued with guilt and despair that will never surrender until accountability is accepted. Victor, by creating the monster, owed the monster an honest effort to provide for his well-being and assure his safety. By disown ...
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  • Henry Ford - 1,866 words
    Henry Ford When Henry Ford was born on June 30th, 1863, neither him nor anyone for that matter, knew what an important role he would take in the future of mankind. Ford saw his first car when he was 12. He and his father where riding into Detroit at the time. At that moment, he knew what he wanted to do with his life: he wanted to make a difference in the automobile industry. Through out his life, he achieved this in an extraordinary way. That is why he will always be remembered in everyones heart. Whenever you drive down the road in your car, you can thank all of it to Henry Ford. Through his life he accomplished extraordinary achievements such as going from a poor farm boy to a wealthy inv ...
    Related: ford, ford motor company, henry ford, general motors, good luck
  • Human Disease Research - 2,361 words
    ... ical retardation. Abnormal development of any body part in a fetus may produce a congenital defect; for example, if walls that separate the chambers of the heart fail to form completely, the baby is born with congenital heart disease. BImmunological Diseases Immunological diseases occur when the immune system, which normally protects against infections, malfunctions. The most common types of immunological diseases are allergies, autoimmune diseases, and immune deficiencies. An allergy is an abnormal reaction of the immune system to foreign substances, such as plant pollen, fungal spores, animal danders, medications, and foods. Rhus dermatitis is an allergy caused by contact with urushiol ...
    Related: cardiovascular disease, disease research, heart disease, human body, human disease, human history, human population
  • Ireland - 1,355 words
    Ireland The Great Starvation of Ireland I. The starvation in Ireland: 1845-1852 Over the years, the people of Ireland have suffered many hardships, but none compare to the devastation brought by the Irish potato famine of 1845-1857. A poorly managed nation together with ideally wicked weather conditions brought Ireland to the brink of disaster. It was a combination of social, political and economic factors that pushed it over the edge. After a long wet summer, the potato blight first appeared in Wexford and Waterford in September of 1845. The phytophora infestans were carried in on ships from Europe and America. Less than a year later, in August of 1846, virtually the entire potato crop in I ...
    Related: ireland, british government, economic system, british army, target
  • King Arthur - 394 words
    King Arthur There has been a lot of material written about the legendary King Arthur and although he has been a popular figure inliterature for over 800 years, not a lot is known about the real Arthur. It is believed that Arthur was a 5the-century British King named Riothamus (meaning "high king") who ruled from 454 - 470 A.D. and led an army into Gaul where he was defeated by the Goths of Burgundy. Two men by the names of Jordanes (6the century) and William (11the century) contributed to the legend of Arthur. Their input was perhaps the real basis of future adaptations of the story. Arthur appeared in literature as a national hero in a book written in Latin by Geoffrey of Monmouth called Hi ...
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  • London Docklands - 1,722 words
    London Docklands London Docklands "Evaluate the success of the economic, social and physical regeneration of The London Docklands." In Medieval times development occurred on the Thames, where Romans had once settled. Growth of shipbuilding industry led to the development of this area. The London Docks were built between 1700 and 1921. The reason was to ease congestion on the Thames between ships, and the lock gates helped to control the water level in the river. Security was also improved within the docks because of the high walls around the dock basins. The Eastend of London developed around the Docks. At the docks hay day London was at the centre of world trade. However in 1967 the docks s ...
    Related: london, good thing, main problem, office space, investment
  • Nato - 1,707 words
    NATO Fifty years ago on April 4, 1949, twelve countries signed the Treaty of Washington and formed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. There were a total of sixteen countries that signed this treaty. Those countries were the following: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom and the United States. These various groups of countries came together and formed the NATO Alliance. They wanted to help the world maintain peace due to the Soviet Unions threat on the non-Communist countries of Western Europe. In the early 1990s, political critics began to criticize NATO saying that is was not needed anymore after the control ...
    Related: nato, british isles, coastal zones, arms control, civilization
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