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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: british empire

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  • Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre - 1,400 words
    Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre Agatha Christie: Queen of the Mystery Genre Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Miller of Torquay, Devon, England. Researchers debate on the year in which she was born, but it was September 15 in either 1890 or 1891. Her father was an American who lived with his British wife in Torquay. At the time, her parents did not realize that their daughter would one day become a famous English author, writing an insatiable amount of novels and plays. Her focus was mainly on the mystery genre of literature. She was married two times, and bore one daughter by her first husband. In 1971, five years before her death, Christie was given the ...
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  • American History - 1,092 words
    American History Although Britians North American colonies had enjoyed considerable prosperity during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, beginning with the Stamp Act in 1765 the British government began to put pressures on them, largely in the form of taxes and new trade restrictions, that drew increasingly resistance. (Out of Many, 133) One big reason that the loyal British citizens in North America were transformed into rebels is because of the taxes. It was not the prices of the tax, because Britain had one of the lowest taxes in the world at that time, it was the fact that Parliament had so much representation over them. The British empire was a mercantile market. They ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american history, american revolution, history, north american
  • American Revolution - 448 words
    American Revolution In this Essay I will point out the different causes that led up to the American Revolution. The main three reasons are Political, Economic and Social Causes. In my opinion of the American Revolution the Political reason was the most important, because for the most part the colonists did not agree that the Parliament had the right to make laws for American colonists and to tax them when the colonists had no elected representatives in the Parliament. The Economic causes of the Revolution are second most important. In the eyes of Great Britain the American colonists primary job was to build a favorable balance of trade. With a favorable balance of trade a nation could be sel ...
    Related: american, american colonists, american revolution, stamp act, boston massacre
  • Animal Farm As Animal Satire - 2,302 words
    Animal Farm as Animal Satire Let American Consumer Counseling Help you Get Out of Debt! Animal Farm as Animal Satire This study aims to determine that George Orwell's Animal Farm is a political satire which was written to criticise totalitarian regimes and particularly Stalin's practices in Russia. In order to provide background information that would reveal causes led Orwell to write Animal Farm, Chapter one is devoted to a brief summary of the progress of author's life and significant events that had impact on his political convictions. Chapter one also presents background information about Animal Farm. Chapter two is devoted to satire. In this chapter, definition of satire is presented an ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, satire, spanish civil, nikita khrushchev
  • Animal Farm: Animal Satire - 2,305 words
    Animal Farm: Animal Satire A Research Paper Table Of ContentS ABSTRACT i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ii 1. CHAPTER THE AUTHOR: GEORGE ORWELL 1 1.1. PRESENTATION 1 1.2. HIS LIFE 1 1.3. HIS TIME: POLITICAL BACKGROUND 4 1.3.1. THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION 5 1.3.2. THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR 7 1.4. ORWELL AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR 8 1.5. ANIMAL FARM 9 2. CHAPTER SATIRE 13 2.1. PRESENTATION 13 2.2. WHAT IS SATIRE? 13 2.2.1. DEFINITION 13 2.2.2. CHARACTERISTICS OF SATIRE 14 2.2.3. TECHNIQUES OF SATIRE 17 3. CHAPTER METHOD OF RESEARCH 19 3.1. PRESENTATION 19 3.2. PROCEDURE 19 4. CHAPTER ANIMAL FARM AS SATIRE 21 4.1. PRESENTATION 21 4.2. ELEMENTS OF SATIRE IN ANIMAL FARM 21 4.2.1. SUMMARY OF THE PLOT 22 4.2.2. SATIRICAL ...
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  • Auschwitz - 1,053 words
    Auschwitz Auschwitz How could all this have happened? This is one of the many questions associated with the Holocaust. The Third Reich of no doubt on of the worlds largest and most feared empires. It could have easily overthrown the Roman Empire and was the most worthy adversary of the British Empire. The most overwhelming and terrifying aspect of the Second World War has got to be the ghettos, concentration camps and of course the death camps. The camp that stands out in everybodys mind has got to be Auschwitz. Out of the 6.8 million killed there were 6000 killed at Auschwitz a day. What some people may not know is that Auschwitz was actually three camps fused into one. The most potent and ...
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  • Ben Franklin - 1,679 words
    Ben Franklin Ben Franklin was the definition of the self-made man. He began his career as a simple apprentice for a printer (his brother) following leaving school at the age of 10, but he and his writings went far beyond the shop where he first started. He spent the early years of his life as a printer, moralist, essayist, scientist, inventor, and a philosopher. He later went on to become a civic leader, statesman, and diplomat. Upon man of those careers he was a strong force in developing the new nation of America. His political views showed him to be a man who loved freedom and self-government. His common sense, his whit, and his ability to negotiate behind the scenes lent a hand in the fo ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, british empire, university press, presidency
  • Ben Franklin Biographycritique - 1,615 words
    ... del for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Bens parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josiahs seventeen children by two wives (#1). Printer & Writer Franklin left school at ten years old when he was pressed into his father's trade. At twelve Ben was apprenticed to his half brother James, a printer of The New England Courant. He generally absorbed the values and philosophy of the English Enlightenment. At the age of 16, Franklin wrote some pieces for the Courant signed Silence Dogood, in which he parodied the Boston a ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, franklin stove, stamp act, articles of confederation
  • British Imperialism In Africa - 790 words
    British Imperialism in Africa British Imperialism in Africa The motives of Britain's imperialist activities in Africa from 1869 to 1912 were strategic and defensive. While other motives did exist, such as to colonize, to search for new markets and materials, to attain revenge and world prestige, to convert natives to Christianity, and to spread the English style of orderly government, the main motives evident in many events of the period showed attempts to safeguard the country and protect former land holdings. As its free trade and influential relationship with Africa was threatened, Britain began to turn trade agreements into stronger and more formal protectorates and even colonies. Britai ...
    Related: africa, british, british empire, british imperialism, east africa, imperialism, south africa
  • British In 19th - 1,840 words
    British In 19th The nineteenth (19th) century was a period of great change and accompanying social unrest in the British Isles. Most outstanding among the changes was the industrial revolution. As everything in life, it brought good, but it also brought evil. The industrial revolution combined with the expansion of the British Empire made the United Kingdom, the richest and most powerful country in the world. Some of the islanders became unbelievably wealthy, but others, unfortunately, became unbelievably poor. Writers from this historical period cognizant of the human suffering, became social critics of what was taking place in England, of how the rich and powerful became more oppressive th ...
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  • Cats - 1,236 words
    Cats Many people today have pets for pleasure and companionship. Nearly any animal can be a pet, such as hamsters, rabbits, birds, fish, frogs, horses, and even cats and dogs. Besides being a loving companion, pets serve many other purposes as in protecting homes, destroying vermin, and providing a means of transportation. The elderly and the childless couples can rely on a pet as an emotional outlet. In addition, pets can be kept for their beauty, rarity, or for the beautiful sounds that birds can make. Today pets are usually purchased from breeders, pet shops, or animal shelters rather then individually captured and tamed. All pets were made domestic, including cats. Cats are the second mo ...
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  • Causes Of The American Revolution - 1,484 words
    Causes Of The American Revolution CHAPTER 2, Q1: What are the decisive events and arguments that produced the American Revolution? It was the best of times, it was the worst of times (Charles Dickens). This best describes the Americas in the 1700s. The settlers went through the best of times from obtaining religious freedom, to becoming prosperous merchants, and finally to establishing a more democratic government. However, it was the worst of times in the sense that the settlers in the Americas were taken advantage of my their mother country, England. The hatred of being under anothers control was one of the main reasons that led to the American Revolution. In the 1600s, England began to co ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american journey, american revolution, harvard university
  • Daudi Bohra English As Spoken In Sri Lanka - 2,090 words
    Daudi Bohra English As Spoken In Sri Lanka Daudi Bohra English as spoken in Sri Lanka by Tasneem Amirally Akbarally Paper V - Standards & Varieties of English Dr. Manique Gunesekara 1st November 2001 Daudi Bohra English as spoken in Sri Lanka Just a few centuries ago English was only spoken by about five to seven million people on Britain, which was merely one, relatively small island. The language at that time only consisted of dialects spoken by monolinguals. But the story of English is quite different today. There are more non-native than native speakers of English, and it has become the linguistic key used for opening borders. It is now a global medium with local identities and messages. ...
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  • Declaration Of Independence - 1,341 words
    Declaration Of Independence The Declaration of Independence is perhaps the most masterfully written document of Western civilization. This essay seeks to illuminate that artistry by probing the discourse microscopically at the level of the sentence, phrase, word, and syllable. By approaching the Declaration in this way, we can shed light both on its literary qualities and on its rhetorical power as a work designed to convince the American colonies they were justified in seeking to establish them as an independent nation. The introduction consists of the first paragraph a single, lengthy, periodic sentence: When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve th ...
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  • Decline Of The American Empire - 2,325 words
    Decline of the American Empire In any era there are different protagonists, playing the same game on a similar board. Like a game of monopoly, there are nations competing to become the foremost leaders of their time. They amass great wealth, powerful armies, and political sway. When the influence and might of these countries transcends the confines of their boundaries, so that they become a presence throughout the world, they become empires. At times, it seems as though one of these empires wins the game, becoming the undisputed superpower in the world. Today, there is one such nation that has outlived all of its rivals in the great game, it is the United States of America. This vast empire ...
    Related: american, american civilization, american culture, american democracy, american economic, american economy, american empire
  • During The 1500s To 1800s, The Strength And Stature Of A - 1,618 words
    During the 1500's to 1800's, the strength and stature of a country depended upon its political power, which can be traced to how self-sufficient it was. Striving to be self-sufficient was what nations sought after; dependency was not a characteristic of a powerful nation. Raw materials were the most required item to strengthen the central government, and deter interactions, such as trade with other nations. The first country to introduce mercantilism in America was Spain. The spanish american colonies were not allowed to trade directly with Europe. Instead they had to funnel all of the sugar and tobacco, two common commdities of the new land, through Spain. When this was done, heavy custom d ...
    Related: stature, english speaking, spanish colonies, taxation without representation, english-speaking
  • Easter Rising Of 1916 - 398 words
    Easter Rising Of 1916 The events of Easter Monday, the 24th of April, 1916 triggered a bloody confrontation that would have important ramifications both for the Irish people and the British Empire. What would later become known as the Easter Rising was an attempt to end British rule in Ireland. At the onset of the First World War in 1914 the Irish Home Rule Bill was suspended, returning the Irish people to direct rule by the British government. This was viewed as a slap in the face by many in Ireland. It became the primary source of tension between the Royal Irish Constabulary, an armed police force appointed by the British Crown, and opposing rebel groups. The Royal Irish Constabulary consi ...
    Related: easter, rising, michael collins, irish free state, buildings
  • Emily Murphy: A Great Canadian - 744 words
    Emily Murphy: A Great Canadian It was only in this century that women in Canada had equal rights as men. But this would never happen if women themselves would not start fighting for their rights. One of these women was Emily Murphy and her greatest achievement, Emily proved that women are `persons' and therefore they have the right to work in any political office. Her life and political career lead her to this achievement. Emily Gowan Ferguson was born on March 14, 1868 in a village of Cookstown. It was Uncle Thomas who was a politician and who influenced Emily's interest in politics. At fifteen Emily moved to Toronto and attended the Bishop Strachan School for Girls. Emily married Reverend ...
    Related: canadian, emily, british north, governor general, pierre
  • English Views Of The Native Americans - 1,330 words
    English Views Of The Native Americans English Views of the Native Americans After reading chapter three of Unger's American Issues, I now have a better understanding of how English settlers looked upon the lifestyles of the Native Americans. Four key people that have led to this understanding are Hugh Jones, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, William Penn, and John Heckewelder. In their essay's they give accurate accounts of how the Native Americans lived, through their eyes. I also see how European beliefs reflected their views and how this set the stage for conflict among these groups. In Hugh Jones' essay titled, Characteristics of the Indians, he basically gives a factual account of how the Indian ...
    Related: american history, native, native americans, british empire, benjamin franklin
  • Europe 1914 - 682 words
    Europe 1914 Chapter 7: Both Hitler and Stalin hated "modern art" and persecuted the artists who made it. What was there about the "new aesthetic" which revolted and frightened these dictators? Since prehistoric times, when men communicated through crude drawings on cave walls, art has been used to elicit an emotional response. Everyone has had the experience of viewing a piece of art that "touched" them in some way. Whether that feeling was happiness, sorrow, anger, or lust, and whether the art form was a painting, or weaving, or sculpture, is immaterial. It still evoked a response on some level of your psyche. In my personal experience, I have sometimes had a feeling from a painting I had s ...
    Related: eastern europe, traditional values, time zone, civil wars, churchill
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