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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: adolescence

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  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • Adolescence - 667 words
    Adolescence Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary (1980) defines adolescence as the state or process of growing up; even more specifically, adolescence is also defined as the period of life from puberty to maturity terminating legally at the age of majority. Looking back on their adolescence, adults often conjure up grand memories, and laugh at their mistakes. Adolescence is a period in life that everyone must 'survive' in order to become an adult, although some go through it more turbulently than others. Falling approximately between the ages of 12 and 20, adolescence is characterized by physical changes leading to sexual maturity (Encyclopedia.com). Along with these obvious physical changes, ...
    Related: adolescence, collegiate dictionary, parental guidance, criminal behavior, encyclopedia
  • Adolescence - 1,083 words
    Adolescence Adolescence for me is the period within human life when most of a person's characteristics are changing from childlike to adultlike. Changes in the body are the most observable occurring at this stage. Other kinds of developments take place such as, intellectual, academic. Social and spiritual. Physical Selves During the phase of Adolescence, girls body is changing in size, shape, and hormonal structure. Adolescent girls focus on their changing bodies. They feel, look and act differently. Absorbing all these changes is very difficult. The preoccupation with bodies at this age cannot be overstated. Small flaws become obsessions. Just at this point that their bodies are becoming ro ...
    Related: adolescence, social life, physical appearance, adolescent girls, sexuality
  • Adolescence Is A Time Of Storm And Strife - 1,781 words
    Adolescence Is A Time Of Storm And Strife : : Introduction : : Adolescence is a time of storm and strife. Adolescence is a period of time between childhood and adulthood. This is the age when one can either make something of his life or destroy it all, this is the time when a person makes those friends who changes the how he looks at life and how he faces it. An adolescent's main goal these days is to fit in and not be different from their peers. In this paper I will explore the probabilities of the following grievances experienced by the adolescent youth which are drugs, suicide, and homelessness. : : Body of the Essay : : Adolescence is the developmental stage between childhood and adultho ...
    Related: adolescence, storm, primary care, outdoor recreation, people's
  • A Review Of Personal Relationships After Sexual Victimization - 811 words
    A Review Of Personal Relationships After Sexual Victimization A Review of Relationships After Sexual Victimization Abstract Flangan and Furman conducted two studies to examine the links between sexual victimization and perceptions of romantic, parental, and peer relationships. An attachment perspective is proposed for understanding the impact of sexual victimization on close relationships for both high school and college students. Many adolescent and young women experience some form of undesired or forced sexual experience with strangers or acquaintances. Anything from unwanted touching to rape would be considered a forced sexual encounter. The literature on college and older women shows tha ...
    Related: personal relationships, relationships, sexual, sexual behavior, sexual satisfaction, social relationships, victimization
  • A Separate Peace - 768 words
    A Separate Peace Breaking The Mold In John Knowle's, A Separate Peace, there is a transformation in all the key elements in the book, from the rivers to the tree to the seasons to the characters. The transformation is specifically seen in Leper, Gene, and Phineas. These three young men experience a change not just because of the transitions through adolescence. These changes also come about because of the war, the school, and an injury. Leper Lepellier is a very odd young man. He is quiet and is finds himself always taken by surprise. He really is not popular and that does not concern him in any way. Leper really has no true friends at the Devon school, but talks to Gene. He entertains himse ...
    Related: separate peace, john knowles, lonely, collecting
  • A Seperate Piece - 448 words
    A Seperate Piece A Separate Peace by John Knowls Is a classic struggle of man vs. himself and man vs. society. Taking place as a flashback, the narrator Gene Forrester tells of his struggles as a prep school student in the years of his life between age 16, and 17 during the period of WWII. Although Gene Forester the narrator and Finny an athletic roommate are best friends, they have to contrasting struggles. Like the garden of Eden the first few chapters express the peacefulness of the summer at the Private school in New England and the land beneath the forbidden tree. Like the Book Billy Budd by Herman Melville, A Separate Peace identifies some of the characters as innocent to the world. Ge ...
    Related: seperate, separate peace, billy budd, book reports, involving
  • A Victim Of The Double Rape - 1,601 words
    A Victim of the Double Rape There is an old saying that goes "behind every strong man is a strong woman". This proverb can be used to describe the legacy of Hernando Cortes and his conquest of Mexico. Like the proverb, he had someone behind him who aided in his goals of dominance. The woman was Dona Marina, otherwise known as La Malinche. Her beauty and intelligence made her into one of the most hated and influential women in Mexico's history. According to Clifford Krauss, "La Malinche is for the most part portrayed as the perpetrator of Mexico's original sin" (110). La Malinche was a victim of a "double rape" (Todorov 49). Her destiny was determined at birth. As a child growing up in native ...
    Related: double, rape, spanish culture, female sexuality, refer
  • Abraham Maslow - 1,910 words
    Abraham Maslow ABRAHAM MASLOW Born April1,1908 Abraham Maslow was the oldest of seven children born to his parents in Brooklyn New York. Feeling pressure from his parents to achieve academic greatness, Abraham went through early childhood with few friends. Focusing mainly on his studies Maslow had a quiet and unfulfilling adolescence. Abraham started off his college career by attending city college in New York were he began to study law, as his father had wanted him to do. He soon lost interest and transferred to the University of Wisconsin and studied psychology. Here Maslow received, in 1934, his Ph.D. During his college career Abraham married his cousin Bertha Goodman, his parents did not ...
    Related: abraham, abraham maslow, maslow, social order, third force
  • Adolescent Behavior In School - 1,601 words
    Adolescent Behavior In School Middle School is a large school and has students attending from six Putnam County towns and two Dutchess County towns. On the average, the graduating class has close to 500 students and the typical class has 32 students attending. The school has two cafeterias in order to accommodate it's large student population, one cafeteria to provide for fifth and sixth graders, and another for seventh and eighth graders. Interesting enough, the different classes do not attend lunch together, in other words, seventh and eighth graders do not attend lunch together nor fifth and sixth graders. Again I assume this is strictly do to the large population of this school. I entere ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent behavior, middle school, school work, more important
  • Adolescent Sexuality - 1,525 words
    Adolescent Sexuality Adolescent Sexuality Sexuality is an important aspect of development during adolescence. The ability to identify and communicate with adolescent who may be at high risk of premature activity is important since sexual intercourse at an early age can have serious short and long-term consequences. An emphasis of confidentiality and an honest appraisal of implications of early sexual activity will enhance discussions about sexual issues with adolescents. Some parents are ill prepared for discussions about sexuality. Having conversations with their adolescent on sexuality may be difficult for them. Many adolescents claim both experience and confidence about sexual issues, the ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent boys, adolescent girls, human sexuality, sexuality
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 1,031 words
    Adoption And Identity Formation There has been an enormous amount of research conducted about adoptees and their problems with identity formation. Many of the researchers agree on some of the causes of identity formation problems in adolescent adoptees, while other researchers conclude that there is no significant difference in identity formation in adoptees and birth children. This paper will discuss some of the research which has been conducted and will attempt to answer the following questions: Do adoptees have identity formation difficulties during adolescence? If so, what are some of the causes of these vicissitudes? Is there a significant difference between identity formation of adopte ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity crisis, identity development, identity formation
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Ae Housman: Scholar And Poet - 1,710 words
    ... not in love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus "lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often c ...
    Related: poet, scholar, new jersey, the giver, mood
  • African American Community - 3,076 words
    African American Community By 1945, nearly everyone in the African American community had heard gospel music (2). At this time, gospel music was a sacred folk music with origins in field hollers, work songs, slave songs, Baptist lining hymns, and Negro spirituals. These songs that influenced gospel music were adapted and reworked into expressions of praise and thanks of the community. Although the harmonies were similar to those of the blues or hymns in that they shared the same simplicity, the rhythm was much different. The rhythms often times had the music with its unique accents, the speech, walk, and laughter which brought along with it synchronized movements. (2) The gospel piano style ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american community, american life
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Alfred Housman - 1,708 words
    ... love with him. Consequently, she should exchange her happiness and love for his suffering, thus"lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well." The metaphor Lovers ills are all to buy....Buy them, buy them" is suggesting that the lads happiness is at the maidens expense (Hoagwood 51). Terence Hoagwood claims: The dualized pairs- buy and sell, well and forlorn, lad and maiden- remain opposed (rather than resolved or reconciled) at the poems end, helping to account for the considerable tension that the poem sustains: the contradictions survive, rather than disappearing (as in sentimentalized love poetry) into a happy illusion at the end (Hoagwood 51). In Housmans poetry, he often concentrat ...
    Related: alfred, housman, critical essays, columbia university, allan
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,163 words
    ... need for cutting labor costs. At this point Alfred and his father were tragically reminded of the peril of nitroglycerine due to the Heleneborg disaster in which Emil was killed as well as some others.4 After this point both Alfred and Immanuel were emotionally traumatized. Soon after Emils death Alfred focused on the manufacturing methods of nitroglycerine and eventually created conditions in which it was rendered harmless. In speaking of Alfred Nobels response to the death of his brother Evlanoff states: He blamed himself with bitterness He mourned that he had not been able to accomplish this sooner, so Emil need not have died. He could never forget the dreadful day of the Heleneborg ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel peace, nobel peace prize, nobel prize
  • Alices Adventures In Wonderland - 1,690 words
    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland An analysis of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland The following text is a small part of a project from: Jerry Maatta, HII, Katedralskolan, Uppsala, Sweden Written in March 1997 Interpretations and opinions It is important to bear in mind that Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, however special it may seem and however many different interpretations one thinks one can find, is, after all, but a story written to entertain Charles Dodgson's favourite child-friends. It is very obvious in the story that it was written for the three Liddell girls, of whom Alice was the closest to Dodgson. In the introductory poem to the tale, there are clear indications to the three, th ...
    Related: wonderland, the girl, young girl, different forms, grief
  • Analysis Of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge Of Courage, And The Catcher And The Rye - 1,559 words
    Analysis Of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge Of Courage, And The Catcher And The Rye Teenagers everywhere have experienced an emotional bond with the characters Huckleberry Fin, Henry Fleming, and Holden Caulfield while reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Catcher in the Rye. Hucks adventure down the Mississippi, Henrys challenging experience in the Civil War, and Holdens weekend of self examination in New York City present various views of the transition of the adolescent into adulthood. All three characters evolve from nave, innocent children to adult men, sharing their experiences, personal interactions, and emotions thus relating to the readers own ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, badge, catcher, catcher in the rye, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, red badge of courage
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