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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: breach

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  • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - 1,054 words
    A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Although the subject matter of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning could be applied to any couple pending separation, John Donne wrote his poem for his wife on the eve of his departure for France in 1611.In the poem, the speaker pleads with his lady to accept his departure. The speaker defines and celebrates a love that transcends the physical and can therefore endure and even grow through separation. In arguing against mourning and emotional upheaval, Donne uses a series of bold and unexpected comparisons for the love between the speaker and his lady. Donne makes his first surprising analogy in the first stanza when he com ...
    Related: mourning, john donne, subject matter, ordinary people, refer
  • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - 1,305 words
    A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Intro to Poetry Oct 10 2000 Interpretation of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Although that it may seem that the meaning of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning could be applied to any couple awaiting separation, according to Izaak Walton, a seventeenth-century biographer, John Donne wrote his poem for his wife, Anne Donne, right before his departure for France in 1611 (Damrosch 238). However, even though the poem is not written to an audience, many of us can learn from what Donne is trying to convey to his wife. In the poem, Donne pleads with his lady to accept his departure. He defines and celebrates a love that transcends the physical realm and expresse ...
    Related: mourning, middle ages, true meaning, john donne, greek
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • America Sports Construction Boom - 1,760 words
    ... have escape clauses that allow the team to move if attendance falls too low or if the facility is not in state-of-the-art condition. Other teams have provisions requiring them to pay tens of millions of dollars if they vacate a facility prior to lease expiration, but these provisions also come with qualifying covenants. Of course, all clubs legally must carry out the terms of their lease, but with or without these safeguard provisions, teams generally have not viewed their lease terms as binding. Rather, teams claim that breach of contract by the city or stadium authority releases them from their obligations. Almost always these provisions do not prevent a team from moving. Some leases g ...
    Related: america, boom, construction, professional sports, sports, sports facilities
  • Anarchy - 1,144 words
    Anarchy Anarchy is seen as one end of the spectrum whose other end is marked by the presence of a legitimate and competent government. International politics is described as being spotted with pieces of government and bound with elements of community. Traditionally, international-political systems are thought of as being more or less anarchic. Anarchy is taken to mean not just the absence of government but also the presence of disorder and chaos. Although far from peaceful, international politics falls short of unrelieved chaos, and while not formally organized, it is not entirely without institutions and orderly procedures. Although it is misleading to label modern international politics as ...
    Related: anarchy, foreign direct, world government, human rights, interdependence
  • Ancient Egyptian And Mesopotamian Cultures - 1,548 words
    Ancient Egyptian And Mesopotamian Cultures Ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian Cultures Around the time 4,000-1,000 BC there were two major western civilizations. Those civilizations were the Ancient Egyptians and the Mesopotamians. Many similarities exist between the civilizations of Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, as well as many differences. Both Egypt and Mesopotamia were polytheistic, that is, they believed their worlds were ruled by more than one god. Both cultures also believed that they themselves were created for the purpose of serving their gods. Their similarities include the existence of educational systems and codes of law. Their differences are found partly in those similarities, ...
    Related: ancient civilizations, ancient egypt, ancient egyptians, egyptian, mesopotamian
  • Andy Worhal - 1,891 words
    Andy Worhal Andy Worhal Andy Warhol, the American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and film maker was born in Pittsburgh on August 6, 1928, shortly afterwards settling in New York. The only son of immigrant, Czech parents, Andy finished high school and went on to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, graduating in 1949 with hopes of becoming an art teacher in the public schools. While in Pittsburgh, he worked for a department store arranging window displays, and often was asked to simply look for ideas in fashion magazines . While recognizing the job as a waste of time, he recalls later that the fashion magazines "gave me a sense of style and other career opportunities." Upon ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, jasper johns, corporate image, rows
  • Area 51 - 732 words
    Area 51 Area 51 Introduction:Area 51 has been at the center of the UFO existence controversy for many years. The government denies its existence, but how do you explain Two-hundred forty-three or more white Jeep Cherokees patrolling an area that does not exist? This and many other factors are what contribute to the mystique of the place called Area 51. Paragraph #1:Area 51 is located in the desert on the south central quadrant sector basin side of Groom Dry Lake, approximately one-hundred miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada. The actual base is located on a dried up lake, in the middle of a mountainous dessert. Paragraph #2:Area 51, also known a Groom Dry Lake, is a secret military facility that ...
    Related: area 51, states government, south central, united states government, sector
  • Article 2b - 1,404 words
    ... consequences. Software is routinely released with many serious, known defects because companies seek short-term profits, while sacrificing long-term customer satisfaction, to meet ship dates. Companies fear being exploited by the competition if knowledge of the defects was released. A software defect is a material breach of the contract for sale or license of the software if it is so serious that the customer can justifiably demand a fix, cancel the contract, return the software, and demand a refund. If the defect is not material, then the customer is probably stuck with the program, and entitled to at most, a partial refund. Article 2B will make it easier for software publishers to refu ...
    Related: personal injury, uniform commercial, product design, stuck, developer
  • Bail Bonds - 1,890 words
    Bail Bonds Criminal Law term paper 17OCT00 Bail Bonds The principle of bail is basic to our system of justice and its practice as old as English law itself. When the administration of criminal justice was in its infancy, arrest for serious crime meant imprisonment without preliminary hearing and long periods of time could occur between apprehension and the arrival of the King's Justices to hold court. It was therefore a matter of utmost importance to a person under arrest to be able to obtain a provisional release from custody until his case was called. This was also the desideratum of the medieval sheriff, the representative of the Crown in criminal matters, who wore many hats including tha ...
    Related: bail, public policy, term paper, court case, prisoners
  • Battle Of Saratoga - 697 words
    Battle of Saratoga The Battle of Saratoga is considered to be the major turning point of the American Revolution. This battle proved to the world that the fledgling American army was an effective fighting force capable of defeating the highly trained British forces in a major confrontation. As a result of this successful battle, the European powers took interest in the cause of the Americans and began to support them. In the British Campaign of 1777, Major General Burgoyne planned a concentric advance of three columns to meet in Albany, New York. He led the main column, which moved southward along the Hudson River. A second column under General Barry St. Leger would serve as a diversionary a ...
    Related: first battle, saratoga, second battle, american revolution, turning point
  • Battle Of The Bulge - 819 words
    Battle of the Bulge The Battle of the Bulge took place on December sixteenth 1944. The Germans mobilized the last chance they had to win the war. The Germans wanted to cut the American forces in to two parts this way the could easily be destroyed. Hitler felt this was his last to win Because his forces were being pushed back and soon they would run out of the resources the would need to win the war. Hitler was mobilizing a task force of 500,000 Germans solders. The allies were slowly pushing throng the Ardennes Forest on the Germany, Belgium Boarder, with a force of 600,000 American solders And 55,000 British solders. Hitler hoped to surprise the Allies of gard and quickly separate the army. ...
    Related: battle of the bulge, army corps, thin line, task force, sargent
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Business Information Systems - 2,279 words
    ... ally, you run two programs: the first program automatically attaches a vendor name to all of your items that require purchase orders in a few seconds. The second program takes all of these items, consolidates individual purchase orders by vendor, and creates purchase orders for many items almost instantly. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS All our products are written in Visual FoxPro and are IBM compatible. At this time we do not offer Macintosh support. Macintosh products are expected to be released third quarter of this year. Absolute minimum requirements would be a Pentium class processor with the following:  32 MB RAM  VGA monitor  Mouse  Printer supported by Win ...
    Related: business information, business solutions, computer system, information systems, operating systems
  • Business Law - 1,059 words
    Business Law Final Exam 1. John owned a cat which wandered into his yard. John was charged with violating a local ordinance which read: "It shall be illegal to permits cows, horses, goats, or other animals to wander about in a yard that is not property fenced." The ordinance had been passed over fifty years ago when wandering animals destroyed neighbor's crops. Is John guilty of violating this ordinance? Using two techniques of statutory interpretation, discuss. 2.Suppose that Perry sues Davis on the theory that Davis is so ugly Perry suffers intense emotional distress in his presence. Davis thinks correctly that there is no rule of law allowing Perry to recover. What procedural device shoul ...
    Related: business law, decision making, contract law, nineteenth century, breach
  • Canadas Copyright Laws - 858 words
    Canada's Copyright Laws Canada's copyright law is one of our hardest laws to enforce. The reason the police have so much trouble enforcing this law, is due to technology. This law is very easy to break, and once broken, it is very hard to track down violators. So although some form of a copyright law is needed, the one we have has, too many holes to be effective. There are three main ways in which the copyright law is broken in everyday life. They is audio/video tape copying, plagiarism, and software piracy. The first, and most commonly violated aspect of the copyright law, is the copying of audio tapes for oneself and friends. Thanks to the invention of dual cassette stereos, this has becom ...
    Related: copyright, copyright laws, computer piracy, software piracy, cracker
  • Charlemagne - 4,290 words
    ... y The Merovingian family, from which the Franks used to choose their kings, is commonly said to have lasted until the time of Childeric [III, 743-752] who was deposed, shaved, and thrust into the cloister by command of the Roman Pontiff Stephen [II (or III) 752-757]. But although, to all outward appearance, it ended with him, it had long since been devoid of vital strength, and conspicuous only from bearing the empty epithet Royal; the real power and authority in the kingdom lay in the hands of the chief officer of the court, the so-called Mayor of the Palace, and he was at the head of affairs. There was nothing left the King to do but to be content with his name of King, his flowing hai ...
    Related: charlemagne, king charles, roman church, faith and religion, brook
  • Christian - 278 words
    Christian Charity "A Model of Christian Charity" was a sermon that was delivered to the passengers on the Arbella. The sermon was about how a Puritan should obey God and behave. The Puritans believed they were included in the covenant God had with Israel(God would protect them if they obeyed God's laws) and they believed they were God's chosen people. In the sermon John Winthrop said "Now if the Lord shall please to hear us and bring us in peace to the place we desire, then hath he ratified this covenant and sealed our commission...." He was talking about how they have obeyed God's law and should get to the place they are going safely because of the covenant. His main point was giving all th ...
    Related: christian, new england, chosen people, john winthrop, america
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