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  • Brave New World Aldous Huxley - 1,108 words
    Brave New World Aldous Huxley Brave New World Aldous Huxley Introduction Aldous Huxley was born on July 26, 1894 in Surrey, England. He majored in literature at Oxford College. After Oxford he did journalism work. Huxley wrote four volumes of poems before his first novel Chrome Yellow (1921). Huxley wrote 45 novels but it was Brave New World that established his fame. Brave New World is a science fiction book dealing with the way things might be in the future. Huxley describes the futures to be so organized that you lose your sense of self. Another book that deals with this aspect of the future is 1985 by George Orwell. Summary The book starts off with the director of hatcheries describing a ...
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  • Brave New World Aldous Huxley - 1,115 words
    ... e novel. Everything came out naturally in the situation. But the plot wasnt the best. What kept the story going more was the humor of the situation. It was humorous the way that this future society laughed at mothers, and looked down upon monogamy and marriage. The way that John continued to call Thomas father causing the laughter of the people working at the hatchery was humorous. Also, another thing that kept the story going was the ideas that this story discussed. Bernard in the beginning of the novel had some morals. He felt uncomfortable to have sex on the first date and he felt deep in his gut that there was more to life than what was spoon fed to him. Sadly, all of his morals and ...
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  • Brave New World And 1984 - 1,206 words
    Brave New World And 1984 Although many similarities exist between Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984, the works books though they deal with similar topics, are more dissimilar than alike. A Brave New World is a novel about the struggle of Bernard Marx, who rejects the tenants of his society when he discovers that he is not truly happy. 1984 is the story of Winston who finds forbidden love within the hypocrisy of his society. In both cases, the main character is in quiet rebellion against his government which is eventually found to be in vain. Huxley wrote A Brave New World in the third person so that the reader could be allotted a more comprehensive view of the activi ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, real world, world history
  • Brave New World And 1984 - 1,356 words
    Brave New World And 1984 Imagine a world in which people are produced in factories, a world lost of all freedom and individuality, a world where people are exiled or "disappear" for breaking the mold. Both 1984 by George Orwell and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World are startling depictions of such a society. Although these novels are of fictional worlds, control of the future may be subtly evolving and becoming far worse than Huxley or Orwell could ever have imagined. Each society destroys the freedom of the individual through various controlling methods such as the denial of language and literature, a caste system and conditioning. One way in which each society controls is by limiting the lang ...
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  • Brave New World By Aldous Huxley - 998 words
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley As man has progressed through the ages, there has been, essentially, one purpose. That purpose is to arrive at a utopian society, where everyone is happy, disease is nonexistent, and strife, anger, or sadness are unheard of. Only happiness exists. But when confronted with Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, we come to realize that this is not, in fact, what the human soul really craves. In fact, Utopian societies are much worse than those of today. In a utopian society, the individual, who among others composes the society, is lost in the melting pot of semblance and world of uninterest. In the science fiction book Brave New World, we are confronted with a man, ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 476 words
    Brave New World By Huxley In Aldous Huxleys "Brave New World" the setting is set many years into the future. This future describes a world where science and technology have been allowed to progress unchecked. There are no moral or spiritual obligations and the good of society is placed above individuality and freedom. Lenina Crown is a perfect example of this society and all that it represents. Lenina Crown is a model example of how unchecked technology can destroy humanity. If you allow every desire to be satisfied with no work or effort it teaches people that they are entitled to privileges and should not have to work for them. With only physical wants considered the moral, emotional, and ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 1,270 words
    Brave New World By Huxley The peak of a writers career should exhibit their most profound works of literature. In the case of Aldous Huxley, Brave New World is by far his most renowned novel. Aldous Huxley is a European-born writer who, in the midst of his career, moved to the United States and settled in California. While in California, he began to have visions aided by his usage of hallucinatory drugs. His visions were of a utopian society surviving here on earth. In his literature, Huxley wanted to make this utopian society as much a reality as possible. "In framing an ideal we may assume what we wish, but should avoid impossibilities." This quote, written by Aristotle, perfectly describe ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 792 words
    Brave New World By Huxley Brave New World opens in a technically advanced future world. In the beginning of this book, we see the Director of World Hatcheries lead the new hatchery students on a tour of a Conditioning Center in London where babies are produced in bottles and pre-sorted to determine which class level they will be born into. These class levels range from Alpha-plus, the highest level, to Epsilon-minus, the lowest. There are no parents, and babies are conditioned from birth to learn certain behaviors. All diseases have been eliminated, and when people are feeling down, they just take soma, a wonder drug. Also, people are conditioned from birth not to love one person, so there i ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 704 words
    Brave New World By Huxley John the savage and Mustapha Mond the world controller both have their separate ideas of what happiness is. Mustapha defends the new society, pointing out the advantages that the savage world does not have, and what he perceives as the people being happy. "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, and I want goodness. I want sin." "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy." "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy." "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent. The right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 1,089 words
    Brave New World By Huxley Huxleys Brave New World is definitely new and is something that is difficult for a person living in a 90s world to imagine for it is so very diverse compared to our society and customs today. The odd world and lifestyle that was prophesied by Aldous Huxley in the first half of the 20th century has much of the same basis of customs but they are just performed different ritually in these peoples everyday routines. If anyone from our time and our world were ever to spend any given amount of time in Huxleys world then they would be confused, shunned by society and looked at almost as a savage like John for having such different and "primitive" ways. This of course would ...
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  • Brave New World By Huxley - 1,145 words
    Brave New World By Huxley Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World out of fear of society's apparent lack of morals and corrupt behaviour during the roaring twenties. Huxley believed that the future was doomed to a non-individualistic, conformist society, a society void of the family unit, religion and human emotions. Throughout the novel, Huxley predicts many events for the future, most of which concentrate on a morally corrupt society. The most important of these predictions include: greater sexual freedom, over-population, brain-washing/sleep-teaching, and the use of mind altering drugs. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World warns of a possible future dystopia, based on social attitudes and medical ...
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  • Brave New World Essay - 743 words
    Brave New World Essay Only if a person (s) has an IQ of 80 and above, has an income above $12,000 a year, has no serious emotional problems, and is able to care for a child should she or he be allowed to have children. Having met these requirements a child license should be issued. This insures that the person having the child is perfectly capable and financially able to provide for him. In society today licenses are handed out left and right. Little boys with puppies have to make sure their dads take them to get dog licenses. Young teenage girls are restricted till they're 17 until they can get their license and scramble for the keys to their parents' car. A couple wanting to spend the rest ...
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  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
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  • Cloning In Brave New World - 1,623 words
    Cloning In Brave New World Cloning in Brave New World by Christopher M. Earhart It has been said that Muhammad is the Seal of the Prophets, meaning that he was the last. However, our world has recently been graced by another prophet in Aldous Huxley. Huxley's prophetic vision is unmistakable in his science-fiction novel, Brave New World, in which he delivers a valuable message: control advancements in technology before they control us. Huxley supports this message with a strong example of a society that is so overrun by technology that the human race has lost their individuality, freedom, and ultimately their identity as human beings. In this Brave New World, artificially-born humans are gen ...
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  • Cost Of Stability In Brave New World - 1,631 words
    Cost Of Stability In Brave New World The Cost of Stability in Brave New World David Grayson once said that Commandment Number One of any truly civilized society is this: Let people be different. Difference, or individuality, however, may not be possible under a dictatorial government. Aldous Huxley's satirical novel Brave New World shows that a government-controlled society often places restraints upon its citizens, which results in a loss of social and mental freedom. The conditioning of the citizens, the categorical division of society, and the censorship of art and religion carry out these methods of limiting human behavior. Conditioning the citizens to like what they have and reject what ...
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  • English Brave New World: Religion The Basis Of Religion Thesis: Mans Need For Answers To Questions That Cannot Be Solved Thro - 682 words
    English Brave New World: Religion The Basis of Religion Thesis: Man's need for answers to questions that cannot be solved through known applications of science and technology has resulted in the widespread belief in religion. I. Purpose Elimination of stress Addiction to soma 1. Rioting addicts 2. Religious fanatics II Characteristics Rituals Sacrifices Offerings B. Gods Interpreters Pope Dali Lama Mustapha Mond D. Writings III. Function Explaining unknown Philosophy Supernatural Providing aid Sanctioning conduct Morals Traditions Delegating decisions The Basis of Religion In the novel "Brave New World" civilized society lives in a world of science and technology. Major changes have occurred ...
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  • Eugenics And A Brave New World - 443 words
    Eugenics And A Brave New World Eugenics. The word strikes fear in the hearts of many. Visions of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, along with memories of Nazi experimentation and the Lynchburg sterilization colonies in the United States, cause many to dismiss the idea of cloning immediately. However, in reality, cloning has nothing to do with eugenics or genetic engineering. Cloning is the duplication of genetic material without any alteration. Germ line therapy, however, involves changing the material for a specific purpose. It does not make sense to combine the two processes for the sake of argument. What affect could cloning have on disease research? Cloning could be extremely valuable in ...
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  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
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  • A False Utopia - 426 words
    A False Utopia In Brave New World, their society is supposed to be a utopia. In actuality, it is far from a utopia because a state of utopia can never really be reached. There will always be factors, however minuscule they might be, that will affect the balance of perfection that makes up a utopia. It is impossible for a state of perfection to exist in this world and we learn this through the situations and characters in Brave New World. One of the characters in Brave New World that infringe upon the balance of perfection is Bernard. Bernard is the type of man that questions and analyzes everything. He is also shy and insecure. Bernard is the epitome of what the establishment does not want a ...
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  • Aldous Huxley - 898 words
    Aldous Huxley Aldous Huxley Many talented twentieth century writers have been overshadowed by classical writers such as Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare. Novels dealing with classical topics are often more recognized than works that tackle controversial topics. Aldous Huxley defies this stereotype, for his controversial works gained great fame while influencing many people. Huxley was not just a successful writer; he was a complex person whose ideas and novels influenced many people. Aldous Huxley was born July 26, 1894 (Its Online-Aldous Huxley) in Godalming, Surrey, England (Aldous (Leonard) Huxley). Huxley was born into a prominent family. His grandfather, Thomas Henry Huxley, was ...
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