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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: boston

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  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,157 words
    Born in Boston in 1809, Edgar Poe was destined to lead a rather somber and brief life, most of it a struggle against poverty. His mother died when Edgar was only two, his father already long disappeared. He was raised as a foster child in Virginia by Frances Allen and her husband John, a Richmond tobacco merchant. Poe later lived in Baltimore with his aunt, Maria Clemm and her daughter Virginia, whom he eventually married. The trio formed a household which moved to New York and then to Philadelphia, where they lived for about six years -- apparently the happiest, most productive years of his life. Of Poe's several Philadelphia homes, only this one survives. In 1844 they moved to New York, wh ...
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  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,175 words
    ... se ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and SWEDENBORG, strongly influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret FULLER, THOREAU, and others made a center of TRANSCENDENTALISM. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A noted lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard ("The American Scholar," 1837 [.txt-only version]). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he asserted that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcend ...
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  • Boston Massacre - 924 words
    Boston Massacre John Hancock stated Let this sad tale of death never be told without a tear; let not the heaving bosom cease to burn with a manly indignation at the barbarous story . . . during his oration of the massacre on 5 March 1774. The Boston Massacre as it was called, was really not a massacre in the sense that a lot of people were slaughtered, it was a massacre in the sense that British governments authority was not to be tolerated. During the next eighteen months, tensions between the Colonists and the British would increase. On a cold morning in February 1770, eleven-year old Christopher Seider was one of several hundred adults and youths surrounding the house of ebenezer Richards ...
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  • Boston Massacre - 1,870 words
    Boston Massacre In my report I will be discussing the Boston Massacre. I will be looking at the Boston Massacre from three different perspectives. These perspectives are the Boston colonists and Samuel Adams, Tom Hutchinson, Lieutenant Governor and Acting Governor in 1770, and Captain Preston and his troops. I will also hold some depositions from people who were actually close or at the massacre. I will be show the differences on how all three felt about the situation. Due to great burden from the different acts that brought many unwanted taxes from the British government, the minds of the Boston citizens were greatly irritated. Some individuals were so irritated that they were abusive in th ...
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  • Boston Massacre - 759 words
    Boston Massacre The British had decided in 1763 to keep an army in the colonies and to tax the colonists to pay for it. Then the British Parliament passed the Quartering Act in 1765. Colonists had to house British soldiers and give each one candle and five pints of beer a day. Go back to England!! the townspeople yelled as 4,000 Redcoats got off their ships, and marched through the streets of Boston. It was 1768 and the Redcoats moved to Boston to make sure the people there paid their taxes. For two years the Redcoats were there, they threatened each other, fist fights broke out, townspeople threw eggs at the Redcoats, people trained their dogs to bite the Redcoats, and people also called th ...
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  • Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence - 1,009 words
    Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence Boston Tea Party Leads to Independence The Boston Tea Party was an important and influential part of America becoming independent from Great Britain. America was formed on the basis of being a free country, however Great Britain held it back from being autonomous. Britain controlled everything about America. Though America was free of some things like religion and politics it was still taxed on many things. Following the Seven Years War, England went through a serious financial crisis as a result of which it was obliged to impose taxes on many products. Among them in particular were goods destined for the colonies, including wine, sugar, molasses, and t ...
    Related: boston, boston harbor, boston tea party, declaration of independence, financial crisis
  • The Boston Massacre - 1,652 words
    The Boston Massacre This period in American history is one that is labeled as a time of change. Change for the American people as a whole and a change in the control of the British government. From the time of the first voyages across the Atlantic to the beginning of the quest for independence, people in this land were, even sometimes unconsciously, beginning to gain a sense of self-motivation and loyalty to those around them that had accompanied them into this New World. The people had gained almost a new identity; one that strayed drastically from the places in which they had came from. This feeling is one that could be labeled as American Patriotism. This patriotism would make these peopl ...
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  • The Boston Tea Party - 905 words
    The Boston Tea Party The importance of the event The Boston Tea Party was the key-event for the Revolutionary War. With this act, the colonists started the violent part of the revolution. It was the first try of the colonists, to rebel with violence against their own government. The following events were created by the snowball effect. There, all the colonists realized the first time, that they were treated wrong by the British government. It was an important step towards the independence dream, which was resting in the head of each colonist. They all flew from their mother country to start a new life in a new world, but the British government didn't gine them the possibility by controlling ...
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  • The Scarlet Letter Defines The Relationship Between The Individual And Society Through Hesters Alienation From Puritan Boston - 587 words
    The Scarlet Letter defines the relationship between the individual and society through Hester's alienation from Puritan Boston caused by the sin she committed, and subsequently the scarlet A she wore on her bosom. Hawthorne's Hester Prynne is a common character among Romantic writers; a rebel who refuses to conform to society's codes. However, in the novel, society is not made out as the sole evil force. While most readers would instinctively feel sympathy for Hester's nonconformist attitude, society had reasons for condemning her. An argument can be made in favor of society insisting that adultery is a crime deserving of a punishment. What Hester and Dimmesdale did was wrong, both of them a ...
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  • There Was A Man Named Josiah Franklin He Owned A Candle And Soap Shop In Boston, Massachusetts The Sign For The Shop Was Shap - 1,088 words
    There was a man named Josiah Franklin. He owned a candle and soap shop in Boston, Massachusetts. The sign for the shop was shaped like a blue ball. Josiah had children, but there were often not living at home. Josiah invited guests to his home to talk and teach his children, but the guests were not aware that they were invited to teach the Franklin children. Both Josiah and his wife felt strongly about educating their children; they took their childrens' education very seriously. Benjamin, one of their children, always listened to the guests; he was a very bright child. Benjamin taught himself to read when he was only five years old. His parents wished that they could send Ben to school, but ...
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  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,262 words
    ... n with us. Animal Farm basically deals with how seeking totalitarian power can and will destroy any attempt at revolution and how power can corrupt even the most probable utopias. One night when Farmer Jones has gone to bed drunk, Old Major, the pig in charge of all, assembles all of the animals of Manor Farm to tell them of a dream he had concerning man's and animal's place in life. He points out how animals are literally worked to death by man, who consumes but does not produce, and thus must remove man by means of rebellion. Shortly thereafter, he dies and the animals begin preparation for this Revolution, whenever it may come. When the hungry animals attack and drive off Jones one da ...
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  • 1994 Baseball Strike - 1,617 words
    1994 Baseball Strike On August 12, 1994 professional baseball players went on strike for the eighth time in the sports history. Since 1972, negotiations between the union and owners over contract terms has led to major economic problems and the absence of a World Series in 1994. All issues were open for debate due to the expiration of the last contract. Until 1968, no collective bargaining agreement had ever been reached between the owners and the players (Dolan 11). Collective bargaining is the process by which union representatives for employees in a bargaining unit negotiate employment conditions for the entire bargaining unit (Atlantic Unbound). Instead, the players were at the mercy of ...
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  • 30year Treasury Bond - 1,120 words
    30-Year Treasury Bond Once considered the linchpin of the government securities market, the United States Treasurys 30-year bond is losing its place as the credit markets bellwether as traders and investors shirt their attention to the shorter-term notes. The bond market is struggling to establish what the new benchmark is, said Ward McCarthy at Stone & McCarthy Research Associates in Princeton, NJ. The U.S. 30-year bond known as the long bond because of its the Treasury with the longest maturity was seen since 1977 as the key gauge of expectations for U.S. inflation and economic growth, and a barometer of overall borrowing rates for the federal government and corporations. Also, these bon ...
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  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find By Flannery Oconnor - 1,311 words
    "A Good Man Is Hard To Find" by Flannery O'Connor "A Good Man Is Hard To Find," by Flannery O'Connor, presents many topics that can be discussed and debated. Christianity is one of the main topics that influence this paper and its meaning. The exploration for the meaning of the Christian faith is continuous throughout O'Connor's paper. Christianity is filled with sin and punishment, good and evil, belief and unbelief, but grandmother fully tells her opinion as she tries to convince "The Misfit" that he is a good Christian man before he kills her. Foreshadowing, personification, and the meaning of religion are all main points effecting the reader as they interpret this story. Foreshadowing is ...
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  • A Loyalist And His Life - 1,490 words
    A Loyalist And His Life The called me M.J., that stood for Michael Jones. It was the early part of April in 1760 when I departed an English port and headed across the waters for the North American colonies where I planned to settle, start a family, and begin what I hoped to be a very prosperous life. It was the summer if 1760 when I planted my feet and my heart in Boston along with several black slaves that I purchased when I arrived here. I brought a hefty 10,000 British pounds in my purse, which was my entire life savings. I was twenty-two years old, turning twenty-three in the fall. I had heard so many wonderful things about this place and I could not wait to get here. When I first arrive ...
    Related: common sense, north american, american colonies, atlantic, personally
  • A Peoples History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary - 831 words
    A People's History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary As the British and Colonists were engaged in the Seven Years War against the French and Indians, the colonists were slowly building up feelings for their removal from under the British crown. There had been several uprisings to overthrow the colonial governments. When the war ended and the British were victorious, they declared the Proclamation of 1763 which stated that the land west of the Appalachians was to be reserved for the Native American population. The colonists were confused and outraged and the now ambitious social elite's were raring to direct that anger against the English since the French were no longer a threat. Howe ...
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  • A Picture Of Colonial Life - 556 words
    A picture of Colonial Life A picture of Colonial Life When the Puritans and Pilgrims were coming to America, they had expected many new opportunities and freedom. They got both--along with loneliness, vulnerability, and ignorance. Now in the new land, they knew very little, except that of their old lives. They had to learn to live new lives, to hunt new and strange game, and experience the feeling of no one being there to help during during difficult times. Sure, they had each other, but when they came up on the shores of this wonderfully new land there was no one there to welcome them with open arms, or nice warm shelter. They knew no one in this new place, and knew nothing of the land. The ...
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  • A Time To Kill - 801 words
    A Time To Kill Tradition is a priceless component to any culture, as it has been shaped and developed by time itself. Tradition passes from generation to generation, exercising its influence through the actions and thoughts of a people. The tradition that has materialized from the history of the American South is no different. It remains a pillar of hope, faith, and pride for those southerners who embrace it. Tradition of the South dictates a way life with roots in the very foundation of the United States. While this may act as a testament to the strength and courage of the people of the south, the fact remains that the principles laid down by this tradition defy civil rights and respect for ...
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  • Abigail - 663 words
    Abigail Abigail's importance in the play is that without her the play would not exist. The play starts with the girls of the village dancing naked in the woods with a fire burning. Then the girls are caught and they all run away. Whilst at this meeting Abigail drinks the blood of a chicken. Her reasons for doing this are as follows. Abigail worked in the Proctor household and then she had an affair with John the master of the house then Elizabeth threw Abigail out of the house because she knew about the affair with Abigail and her husband. Abigail then drinks the chicken blood to send her spirit out to kill Goody Proctor. After the events of the previous night the daughter of Reverend Paris, ...
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