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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: book notes

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  • Barrons Book Notes - 5,371 words
    BARRON'S BOOK NOTES ERICH MARIA REMARQUE'S ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT ^^^^^^^^^^ERICH MARIA REMARQUE: THE AUTHOR AND HIS TIMES Born Erich Paul Remark on June 22, 1898, he grew up in a Roman Catholic family in Osnabruck in the province of Westphalia, Germany--a city in the northwest part of what is now West Germany. He adored his mother, Anna Maria, but was never close to his father, Peter. The First World War effectively shut him off from his sisters, Elfriede and Erna. Peter Remark, descended from a family that fled to Germany after the French Revolution, earned so little as a bookbinder that the family had to move 11 times between 1898 and 1912. The family's poverty drove Remarque as a ...
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  • Barrons Book Notes - 5,432 words
    ... ers in the front lines. His tactlessness makes Paul's first leave more miserable than it might otherwise have been. ^^^^^^^^^^ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FRAU (MRS.) BAUMER Paul's mother is a courageous woman who is dying of cancer. She is the most comforting person Paul finds at home. She alone does not pretend to understand what it is like at the front. Paul is in agony over her illness and is overwhelmed by the love she shows him by preparing his favorite foods and depriving herself in order to buy him fine underwear. ^^^^^^^^^^ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FRAU (MRS.) KEMMERICH Unlike Paul's quiet mother, Franz Kemmerich's mother tends to weep and wail. She had unreasonably exp ...
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  • Book Notes - 1,011 words
    Book Notes Title: After The First Death Author: Robert Cormier Date Started: 02/06/00 Date Ended: 03/06/00 The Characters: a) Main Characters Miro: Miro is a teen-age terrorist that came from another country know, in the story, as their "Homeland". Even Miro himself is uncertain of his age because during the training (Or as they call it, school) age is not important. Te training is preparing them for terrorism. Miro is feeling less and has learned not to give in to the call of nature. For example: Things such as hunger, Restroom needs and most important sleep and tiredness. In the story Miro is a doubtful teen looking for action. Artkin: Artkin is a very dark and dangerous man. He rescued Mi ...
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  • Book Notes - 1,017 words
    ... rtkin told him to hold off. The reason her did that is because he thought the girl would be useful on tending the kids. Also she would make a good hostage. Miro was instructed to get close to the girl and gain her trust. As Miro talked to her he discovered that the girls name was Kate. Kate also had a few secrets of her own. She had a very weak bladder and she also had a spare key to the bus ignition so that once Miro took his periodic breaks and stood outside the bus she would try to drive the bus off the bridge and by doing so save both her and the children. While all of this was going on the police and the soldiers started to move into that are and the woods around the bridge. The woo ...
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  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,210 words
    ... repulsiveness. His is a Dionysianism so passionately self-serving, so deliberate if not cold-blooded, that, corrosive rather than life-giving like the Dionysian at its best, it turns all not only to destruction but to cheapness, ignominy, pointlessness. -Theodore Weiss, The Breath of Clowns and Kings, 1974 - The great stories of murder are about men who could not have done it but who did. They are not murderers, they are men. And their stories will be better still when they are excellent men; not merely brilliant and admirable, but also, in portions of themselves which we infer rather than see. Richard is never quite human enough. The spectacle over which he presides with his bent back a ...
    Related: romeo and juliet, executive committee, the merchant of venice, artist, coriolanus
  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • Catch 22 And Good As Gold Satire - 1,233 words
    ... ony throughout both novels in titles and characters in order to satirize. Throughout Catch-22 Heller discusses the theme of reality and appearance. He also discusses the difference between what is said and what is real. This leads to Hellers irony. The best example of this theme of reality is when Colonel Catchart is discussing whether to punish Yossarian or give him a medal (Peek 21). Dr. Peek also believes that the novel juxtaposes scenes in order to great a "ironic perspective" (Peek 10). In both Good as Gold and Catch-22 Heller names the books ironically. The title of Catch-22 is very ironic because the definition of Catch-22 is that in order to be removed from duty you must be insan ...
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  • Hedda Gabler By Ibsen - 1,012 words
    Hedda Gabler By Ibsen Henrik Ibsens Hedda Gabler is not truly indicative of his vast body of work: the protagonist is female and the play is a character study. Oddly enough, though, Hedda does not evolve or progress throughout the entirety of the work. Rather, she remains a cold and manipulative woman. When this fact is realized, the only task is discovering why Hedda continues as a flat character who is restrained from gaining the status of a hero. Truthfully, there are many variables that shape Heddas life. Nonetheless, two factors in particular stand outher father, General Gabler, and the repressive, masculine society of the era. Although Ibsen does not directly address these issues, he s ...
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  • Of Mice And Men Detail Analysis - 1,005 words
    Of Mice And Men Detail Analysis CHAPTER 1 "O.K. Someday--- we're gonna get the jack together and we're gonna have a little house and a couple of acres an' a cow and some pigs and-----" "An' live off the fatta the lan'," Lennie shouted. "An' have rabbits. Go on George! Tell about what we're gonna have in the garden and about the rabbits in the cages and about the rain in the winter and the stove, and how thick the cream is on the milk you can hardly cut it. Tell about that, George." This was the conversation of two laborers, George Milton and Lennie Small. This was their impossible dream, which once seemed to be within reach. However, due to Lennie's aggressive behavior, this dream evaporated ...
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  • Tennessee Williamss Life Story - 1,340 words
    Tennessee Williams's Life Story Tennessee Williams's Life Story Tennessee Williams' play, The Glass Menagerie, originated in the memory of Williams. Williams' family embodied his father, Cornelius Williams, his mother, Edwina Dakin Williams, his sister, Rose Williams, and his younger brother, Dakin Williams. Cornelius was an alcoholic, always away from home; Tennessee and Cornelius did not have a strong relationship, By the late 1920s, mother and father were in open warfare, and both were good combatants. He came home drunk and picked up a bill-perhaps for Tom's clothing or schoolbooks-and he'd fly into rage.(Spoto, 18). Edwina, on the other hand, revered refinement and the good manners of S ...
    Related: family life, life story, tennessee, tennessee williams, jim o'connor
  • Tennessee Williamss Life Story - 1,338 words
    Tennessee Williams's Life Story Tennessee Williams's Life Story Tennessee Williams' play, The Glass Menagerie, originated in the memory of Williams. Williams' family embodied his father, Cornelius Williams, his mother, Edwina Dakin Williams, his sister, Rose Williams, and his younger brother, Dakin Williams. Cornelius was an alcoholic, always away from home; Tennessee and Cornelius did not have a strong relationship, By the late 1920s, mother and father were in open warfare, and both were good combatants. He came home drunk and picked up a bill-perhaps for Tom's clothing or schoolbooks-and he'd fly into rage.(Spoto, 18). Edwina, on the other hand, revered refinement and the good manners of S ...
    Related: family life, life story, tennessee, tennessee williams, st louis
  • The Novel Native Son Was Published By Richard Wright - 1,401 words
    The novel Native Son was published by Richard Wright in 1940. The book represents the tragedy of Bigger Thomas, a black boy raised in the Chicago slums during the great depression. Wright uses symbolism extensively in the novel. There is even symbolic meaning behind the titles of each of the three parts of the novel. It is symbolism that allows Wright to explain the entire novel in the first few pages. Even though symbols are widely used in the novel, there are only three that are very important. The three most important symbols are the black rat, blindness, and the kitchenette. One of the major symbols in Native Son is the black rat in the first chapter of the novel. The rat symbolizes the ...
    Related: native, native son, richard wright, wright, chelsea house
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