Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: blood cells

  • 128 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • White Blood Cells - 556 words
    White Blood Cells White Blood Cells Bacteria exist everywhere in the environment and have continuous access to the body through the mouth, nose and pores of skin. Further more, many cells age and die daily and their remains must be removed, this is where the white blood cell plays its role. According to this quotation, without white blood cells, also known as leukocytes, we would not be able to survive. White blood cells are our body's number one defense against infections. They help keep us clean from foreign bacteria that enter our bodies. Statistics show that there are five to ten thousand white blood cells per micro liter of blood, however this number will increase during an illness. Whi ...
    Related: blood, blood cells, white blood cells, bone marrow, different kinds
  • Aging Theories - 1,767 words
    ... ter a certain number of divisions, the clock genes are triggered and may produce proteins responsible for cell destruction (Keeton, 1992, 50). Cellular Aging In 1961, a discovery made by Leonard Hayflick showed that normal, diploid cells from such continually Areplaced@ parts of the body as skin, lungs, and bone marrow, divide a limited number of times. Although the cells stop dividing at the point just before DNA synthesis, they do not die. The longer-lived the species, the more divisions the cells undergo. As the age of an individual increases, the number of potential divisions decreases (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 29). This discovery was found using fibroblasts, or cells found in the c ...
    Related: aging, aging process, bone fracture, concise encyclopedia, testosterone
  • Aids - 1,527 words
    ... AIDS from handshakes, hugs, coughs, sneezes, sweat, tears, mosquitoes, or other insects, pets, eating food prepared by someone else, or just being around an infected person. A person can't get it from sharing a cigarette, cigar, or pipe, drinking from the same fountain, or from someone spitting on him or her. A person also can't get it from using the same swimming pools, toilet seats, phones, computers, straws, spoons, or cups. Although the virus has been found in saliva, medical opinion states there is no evidence of contamination through wet kissing(What are HIV/AIDS 1). HIV is not spread through the air or water, unlike many other viruses(HIV/AIDS 2). No one has ever caught AIDS by go ...
    Related: aids, protease inhibitors, local government, state and local government, isolated
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Aids - 1,178 words
    Aids For an epidemic that would explode to claim hundreds of thousands of lives, AIDS surfaced very quietly in the United States, with a small notice on June 4, 1981 in a weekly newsletter published by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, alerting doctors to five unusual cases of pneumonia that had been diagnosed in Los Angeles residents over the previous few months. All the patients were homosexual men who had come down with PCP (Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia), a lung infection usually seen only severely malnourished children or adults undergoing intensive chemotherapy. But until they got sick the California men were well nourished, vigorous adults, whose immune systems should have ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, aids research, high blood pressure, blood cells
  • Aids - 1,410 words
    Aids Aids by sean ross How is HIV Diagnosed? You can get tested for HIV in a number of locations -- including public clinics, AIDS organizations, physicians' offices, and hospitals. Many locations give the test for free. You can choose between anonymous tests, in which you do not give your name to the HealthCare provider, or confidential tests, in which you do give your name. Test sites should provide trained counselors who can offer you support and guidance, no matter what the test result.(Balch-97) An HIV test looks for the antibodies your immune system creates in response to the virus. These antibodies may not appear in your blood until three to six months after HIV infection. Therefore, ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, aids research, disease control, santa monica
  • Aids In Detail - 2,125 words
    ... ne anonymous partner per year. Homosexual men have higher rates of sexually transmits diseases than heterosexual men and women because gay men tend to have larger numbers of different sexual partners, more often engage in furtive (anonymous) sexual activities, and more frequently have anal intercourse. PUZZLING SYMPTOMS Any theory of the new disease also had to account for a puzzling factor: the variety of symptoms seen in AIDS patients before they entered the final phase of complete susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancers. Interviews with AIDS patients revealed many had been very sick for up to a year before they developed their first case of Pneumocystis pneumonia or sho ...
    Related: aids, life expectancy, men and women, hepatitis a, discovery
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Air Pollution - 1,431 words
    Air Pollution Air pollution Introduction With the great concern surrounding the destruction of the earths atmosphere due to air pollution, the immediate and direct harm caused to the human body is often over shadowed. While many are aware that our careless use of hazardous chemicals and fossil fuels may leave the planet uninhabitable in the future, most over look the fact that they are also cause real damage to our bodies at this moment. Such pollutants cause damage to our respiratory system, leading to the fluctuation of the life span of an individual depending on a number of conditions. Amongst these conditions are the individuals specific geographic location, age, and life style. This pap ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, life span, educational foundation, excessive
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,066 words
    Alcoholism is a wide-ranging and complex disease that heavily plagues society. Drinking is defined as the consumption of a liquid, and/or the act of drinking alcoholic beverages especially to excess. Every year alcohol is responsible for 1/2 of all murders, accidental deaths, and suicides; 1/3 of all drowning, boating, and aviation deaths; 1/2 of all crimes; and almost 1/2 of all fatal automobile accidents (Overview 1). Alcohol is a potent nonprescription drug sold to anyone over the national legal drinking age, 21. Unlike carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can be manufactured by the body, alcohol is a substance that is not made within the body. It is a food, because it supplies a conc ...
    Related: alcoholism, binge drinking, consumption, drinking, drinking age, drinking coffee, heavily
  • Allergies - 1,744 words
    Allergies An allergy is an abnormal reaction to ordinarily harmless substance or substances. These sensitizing substances, called allergens, may be inhaled, swallowed or come into contact with the skin. When an allergen is absorbed into the body it triggers white blood cells to produce IgE antibodies. These antibodies attach themselves to mast cells causing release of potent chemical mediators such as histamine, causing typical allergic symptoms. A person who has allergies doesnt have a poor immune system, rather an over protective one. Their immune system fights the allergen when it comes in contact with it even though the allergen isnt harmful. To diagnose allergies a physician will clean ...
    Related: high blood pressure, blood sugar, weight gain, sensitive, remove
  • Anemia - 398 words
    Anemia What is Anemia? Anemia is a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood. The word anemia comes from two Greek roots, together meaning without blood. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, anemia referred to the pallor of the skin and mucous membranes. After medical science advanced, blood cell counts could be done. Anemia became the disease we know today. Symptoms of Anemia Mild anemia may have no outer symptoms. Weakness, fatigue, and pallor are very common symptom. Symptoms of severe anemia are shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, lightheadedness, headache, ringing in the ears, irritability, restless leg syndrome, mental confusion, dizziness, fainting, and dimmed ...
    Related: anemia, cell anemia, iron deficiency anemia, bone marrow, family history
  • Anthropolgy - 1,276 words
    Anthropolgy Anthropology- the study of humankind everywhere, through time, seeks to produce reliable knowledge about people and their behavior, both about what makes them different and what they have in common. What They Do- Physical anth- study humans as biological organisms, tracing there evolutionary development of the human animal and looking at biological variations within the species, past and present (human evol, Primates, Human diversity. Cultural Anth- is concerned with human cultures, or the ways of life in societies. Culture bound- Theories about the world and reality based on the assumptions and values of ones own culture. Within the field of cultural anth are Archaeologist- Is t ...
    Related: blue eyes, common culture, human diversity, assign, volcanic
  • Antibiotics - 1,650 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics have played a major role in our society thanks to Sir Alexander Fleming's careful observations in 1928. Without it, many lives would be in danger due to infectious diseases. Antibiotics are chemical substances produced by various species of microorganisms and other living systems that are capable in small concentrations of inhibiting the growth of or killing bacteria and other microorganisms. These organisms can be bacteria, viruses, fungi, or animals called protozoa. A particular group of these agents is made up of drugs called antibiotics, from the Greek word anti ("against") and bios ("life"). Some antibiotics are produced from living organisms such as bacteria, fu ...
    Related: medical profession, half lives, printing office, concentration, permanent
  • Aromatherapy - 1,357 words
    Aromatherapy There are literally hundreds of types of unconventional medicines. An unconventional medicine is any type of therapy that is different from traditional medicine in the way that it focuses on a patients mind, body, and inner energy, to aid in healing. Some, use magic charms, colour therapy, sound therapy, and juice therapy, in which natural juices are used as tonic therapies. Flower remedy is a system of natural medicine that uses remedies distilled from blooming plants and trees, and some followers believe that flowers are natures gentle tools for treating and preventing disease. (Gottlieb,1995:37) There is even a healing process called food therapy. It involves a healthy diet a ...
    Related: aromatherapy, new mexico, american medical, alternative medicine, teas
  • Arsenic - 1,849 words
    ... arsenic and toxicology are interested in the pending crisis in India because of the wealth of information to be gained. It would be possible to discover what diseases arsenic causes and the information learned could help countries such as Taiwan, Chile, and Mongolia, where there are large problems with arsenic contamination. (Bagla and Kaiser 1996) Response from the Indian government to the crisis is low. They had approved a project that costs $25 million in 1995 that would supply piped water to the Malda district, but there has been scant improvement. In fact, the problem has grown more widespread. Tube wells that were not previously contaminated are now tainted and the federal governme ...
    Related: arsenic, protection agency, problems caused, indian government, stomach
  • Bibliography: This Is My First Biology Paper My Major Is Psychology I Attend An University In Maryland Parttime I Am A Colleg - 1,764 words
    Bibliography: This is my first Biology paper. My major is Psychology. I attend an university in Maryland part-time. I am a college Sophomore. I work in Communications. UNDERSTANDING THE AIDS VIRUS Will I live to see tomorrow? Is there a hope for the future? These are probably the most commonly asked questions among AIDS patients today. This paper delves into the heart of the AIDS topic by giving a detailed definition of the virus, risk factors associated with transmission, and the best treatment methods studied by the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, and other research organizations. AIDS. The word alone strikes fear into every sexually active individual. Why i ...
    Related: attend, biology, maryland, psychology, san francisco
  • Biological Viruses: All Time Enemies - 1,170 words
    Biological Viruses: All Time Enemies First came fever. Then Hamid Mansaray, a young nurse's aide at a remote African hospital, began to hemorrhage. Blood erupted from his nose and mouth. It burst out of capillaries beneath his skin and eyes. By the time I reached the village of Panguma in Serria Leone, Mansaray lay isolated in a special ward. Doctors had diagnosed an obscure illness called Lassa fever. Its cause was a virus, an infective agent so small that 100,000 of them clumped together would still scarcely be visible. Viruses are little more than bundles of genes - strands of DNA or RNA, the molecules that carry the blueprints for all life. Yet viruses are far from simple. They invade ar ...
    Related: biological, white blood cells, yellow fever, common cold, contracts
  • Biology Project Aids - 836 words
    Biology Project - A.I.D.S. A.I.D.S. (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is a very deadly disease. It is mostly translated through the blood, sharing needles, sexual intercourse, and when an infected mother breast-feeds her child. In this essay I will show you the causes, symptoms, clinical progression, opportunistic infections, and the treatment you can receive to delay the effects of aids. Aids are caused by two viruses that belong to a group called retroviruses. Researchers in France discovered this in 1983 and in the U.S. in 1984. This was known as the HIV-1. HIV infects certain white blood cells. Some of these cells are the T-helper and the macrophages, which play key roles in the immu ...
    Related: aids, biology, weight loss, white blood cells, replication
  • Blood - 814 words
    Blood There is a crisis. It is the shortage of blood. We need more blood donors. There's no substitute for human blood -- vital for delivering oxygen and nutrients, removing waste, healing and fighting infection. A person's blood can, however, be shared with others. Every day, thousands of Americans in need of lifesaving blood, including trauma victims and surgery patients, rely on the efforts of volunteer blood donors. We need a steady flow of blood donors to keep our blood supply stable. Many people are eligible to be donors. The biggest requirement is being healthy. Approximately 4 million Americans receive donated blood each year; a demand of nearly 40,000 units each day. Donating blood ...
    Related: blood, blood banks, blood cells, health history, red cross
  • 128 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>