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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: zionism

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  • Theodor Herzl And Zionism - 710 words
    Theodor Herzl And Zionism One of the most important influences in the movement that led to the creation of the state of Israel was Jewish writer and journalist Theodor Herzl. He was born on May 2, 1860 in Budapest, Hungary. Herzl studied law in Vienna, but later on went into a literary career. This proved a good decision, as he became a well-known playwright and essayist and in 1891, Hertzl was appointed Paris correspondent for the Vienna Neue Freie Presse (New Free Press). During the Alfred Dreyfus affair in 1894, anti-Semitic feelings in France spread greatly. This greatly affected Hertzl because before that he believed that the best solution of anti-Semitism in Europe was the assimilation ...
    Related: zionism, european jews, best solution, jordan river, founded
  • Zionism And Zionists - 1,206 words
    Zionism And Zionists ZIONISM AND ZIONISTS In the years just after World War II, Zionism (the desire to rebuild a Jewish national presence in the Promised Land) became a popular Jewish cause all around the world. Many Jews who were not practicing Judaism at all with religion became involved with the establishment of the State of Israel. Even today, many years after the successful founding of the State of Israel, there are Jews whose only real tie to Judaism is their belief in Zionism and their support for the State of Israel. They are joined by many Jews who are members of synagogues and support a modern Jewish religious movement, but who also find their prime identity as Jews in the Zionist ...
    Related: zionism, modern democracy, ashkenazi jews, human beings, singular
  • Zionism And Zionists - 1,171 words
    ... red the ordination of women as rabbis. The Reform movement currently has the largest membership of any Jewish religious group in the United States. It is well represented in Europe, Asia, Mexico, and Australia; and, in recent years, it has had some limited success in Israel, as well. CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM The Conservative movement emerged in Germany and America in the last century. The early leaders of Conservative Judaism broke away from the German Reform movement in order to pursue a middle route between radical reform and reactionary stagnation. In America, leaders of the Reform movement actually helped to establish Conservative Judaism in the early twentieth century, in the belief tha ...
    Related: zionism, first century, religious right, conservative judaism, moses
  • A Philosopher Of Nature - 1,482 words
    A Philosopher Of Nature A PHILOSOPHER OF NATURE December 1, 1998 Paper # 2 Intro to Philosophy Fifty years ago the single greatest philosopher walked upon this earth. How can I be so dauntless as to refer to one man as The Greatest philosopher? The answer is simple. All philosophers ask questions. Few of these questions will produce earth-shattering revelations and even fewer will change the world. Out of the handful of philosophers who have made a difference in the world I can think of only one who has, by use of an amazing mind and knowledge of complex mathematics, changed the world forever. Albert Einstein was born in Ulm Germany on March 14, 1879, and spent his youth in Munich, where his ...
    Related: philosopher, franklin d roosevelt, general theory, second world, fascination
  • Albert Einstein - 1,461 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein In the next few pages I will talk about a famous mathematician I decided to choose and write an essay about. I chose probably the most well known mathematician/inventor in the world, his name is Albert Einstein. I chose him because he is the one I know the most about and finding information would not have been as hard. In the next few pages I will tell you about his life as a kid, his life as a mathematician, and his life as an inventor. His name was Albert Einstein. He was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. Before his first birthday, his family had moved to Munich were Albert's father, Hermann Einstein, and uncle set up a small Electro-chemical business. ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, world war 1, random house
  • Albert Einstein - 1,015 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was a famous scientist, writer and professor. He was born in Ulm, Germany, on March 24,1879. As a child, Einstein wasn't like the other boys: he hated school but loved math. He was shy, and talked very slowly. He didn't participate in sports but instead played with mechanical toys, put together jigsaw puzzles, built towers and studied nature. At school and home he would ask many questions and because of that everybody thought he was dumb. Once when he was sick in bed, his father Herman, bought him a compass; and Albert asked "Why does the needle point to the north?" His father didn't know the answer. Herman was calm, friendly and had a black mustache. Einstein ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, world peace, southern germany
  • Arab Israeli Conflicts From 1960 1970 - 1,113 words
    Arab / Israeli Conflicts From 1960 - 1970 Israel's incredible victories, in just 6 days, Israeli armies conquered the West Bank, including the Old City of Jerusalem, the Gaza strip and the Syrian Golan Heights, defeating simultaneously the armies of Egypt, Jordan and Syria. But more than that, Israel created a new reality in the Middle East - and sowed the seeds for deep dissent within its own society. Today over 400,000 Israelis live on land conquered in the 1967 war. Their fate and the fate of those lands is the stumbling block on which over 20 years of attempts to forge a comprehensive peace between Israel and her Arab neighbours has floundered. For some Israelis, Zionism was fulfilled wi ...
    Related: arab, arab israeli, arab league, arab world, israeli
  • Arabisraeli Conflict - 981 words
    Arab-Israeli Conflict The Arab-Israeli conflict came about from the notion of Political Zionism. Zionism is the belief that Jews constitute a nation (or a people) and that they deserve the right to return to what they consider to be their ancestral home, land of Israel (or Palestine). Political Zionism, the belief that Jews should establish a state for themselves in Palestine, was a revolutionary idea for the 19th Century. During World War I, Jews supported countries that constituted the Central Powers because they detested the tyranny of czarist Russia. Both the Allies and Central Powers needed Jewish support, but Germany could not espouse Zionism due to its ties with the Ottoman Empire, wh ...
    Related: arab israeli conflict, israeli conflict, winston churchill, balfour declaration, commitment
  • Book Report - 583 words
    Book Report The Chosen, Chaim Potok The Chosen is about two Jewish boys, one a Orthodox Jew and one a Hasidic Jew, and how different and yet the same their lives are. The orthodox Jew, Reuven, is the main character of the story. He lives with his father and his mother is dead. Reuven is a very nice boy who is fourteen years old and aspires to be a Rabbi when he grows up. Daniel the other boy, is the son of a Hasidic Tzadik (which is like a Rabbi) and so when his father dies he will have to take his place even though he wants to be a psychiatrist. Reuven, like I said before lives alone with his father in their Brooklyn apartment. His father is a teacher of Jewish law, the Talmud, and teaches ...
    Related: book report, religious faith, chaim potok, eye surgery, daniel
  • Israel: Political, Cultural, And Religious Description - 1,441 words
    Israel: Political, Cultural, And Religious Description ISRAEL A Political, Cultural, and Religious Description of the Current Atmosphere As Exists in Israel Israel, in the 1990's, is in a continual state of political, cultural and religious flux. Religion continues to play a central factor in the difficulties which the state has been and continues to experience. This unique country is characterized by an amalgam of cultural and ethnic diversity. This historical and cultural fact ensures that the difficulties the state has been experiencing in realizing self-adjustment will continue. At the same time, there exist mostly positive and persistent facets of the culture which continue unabated as ...
    Related: united states of america, mass immigration, general assembly, indigenous, dogma
  • Israeliarab Antagonism - 1,338 words
    ... n the resolution of the General Assembly of 29 November in order to make them more equitable, workable and consistent with existing realities in Palestine. A. The area known as the Negeb, south of a line running from the sea near Majdal east southeast to Faluja (both of which places would be in Arab territory), should be defined as Arab territory; B. The frontier should run from Faluja northeast to Ramla and Lydda (both of which places would be in Arab territory), the frontier at Lydda then following the line established in the General Assembly resolution of 29 November. C. Galilee should be defined as Jewish territory. 3) The disposition of the territory of Palestine not included within ...
    Related: united nations, mass communication, west bank, unconditional, galilee
  • Night By Elie Wiesel - 585 words
    Night By Elie Wiesel Although Night is not necessarily a memoir--as discussed in the "Overall Analysis and Themes" section--I will often refer to it as a memoir, since that is the genre which closest approaches the mixture of testimony, deposition and emotional truth-telling that is in Night. Finally: it is clear that Eliezer is meant to serve, to a great extent, as the author Elie Weisel's surrogate and representative. With alterations of minor details, what happens to Eliezer is what happened to Weisel himself during the Holocaust. Please bear in mind, however, that there is a difference between the persona of Night's narrator, Eliezer, and that of the author, Elie Weisel. Night is narrate ...
    Related: elie, elie wiesel, wiesel, american army, present danger
  • Of All The Scientists To Emerge From The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries There Is One Whose Name Is Known By Almost All Li - 1,668 words
    Of all the scientists to emerge from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries there is one whose name is known by almost all living people. While most of these do not understand this man's work, everyone knows that its impact on the world of science is astonishing. Yes, many have heard of Albert Einstein's General Theory of relativity, but few know about the intriguing life that led this scientist to discover what some have called, "The greatest single achievement of human thought." Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on March 14, 1874. Before his first birthday, his family had moved to Munich where young Albert's father, Hermann Einstein, and uncle set up a small electro-chemical business. He w ...
    Related: emerge, nineteenth, twentieth, president roosevelt, princeton university
  • The American Reaction To The Halocaust - 1,272 words
    The American Reaction To The Halocaust In the years of the Second World War, American leaders were aware of the plan of the Germans to exterminate all the Jews in Europe, yet they did not act to save them. The attitude in society and the state of the economy in the years leading up to the war made for conditions that did not make saving them likely. Most Germans despised the Weimar Republic, which held control of Germany at the time they signed the Versailles Treaty. This treaty crippled Germany after they lost The First Great War. The proud Germans saw this republic as weak. Adolph Hitler, an Austrian born man of German lineage, claimed that the only true Germans were Aryans and that the Je ...
    Related: american, american policy, pearl harbor, more effective, returning
  • The Aviary, The Aquarium, And Eschatology - 3,743 words
    ... s in their psychic "sorties" to locate Soviet submarines. Alexander seems to have an extremely eclectic background -- he received a PhD. in Thanatology (the study of death and near-death experiences) from Georgetown University under the tutelage of the celebrated Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. Apparently, Alexander is a "mind-control" junkie, having studied everything from Silva Mind Control, to a stint in a Buddhist monastery. When the National Research Council issued its findings that there was no evidence of paranormal phenomena, Alexander wrote a critique of the report that was both passionate and eloquent. In this rebuttal, he compared the report's apparent a priori conclusions to the C ...
    Related: eschatology, moral dilemma, practical applications, board of directors, futurist
  • The Jewish Way Of Life Has Been Affected In A Tremendous - 1,590 words
    The Jewish way of life has been affected in a tremendous way by the people of the United States of America. By the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, there were only 2500 Jews in America. For forty years beginning in 1840, 250,000 Jews (primarily from Germany, Hungary, and Bohemia) entered this country. Anti-Semitism and economic woes in Eastern Europe went from bad to worse after the pogroms of 1881-1882. Almost three million Eastern European Jews left between 1881 and 1914, two million (85%) of which decided to come to America, where they thought "the streets were paved with gold." They were wrong. Because of this intercontinental migration, the social characterization ...
    Related: jewish, jewish american, jewish life, jewish religion, tremendous
  • The Jews Are A People With A Multitude Of Dilemmas From The - 1,153 words
    The Jews are a people with a multitude of dilemmas. From the Israelite tribes to the prosperous modern day Israel , bigotry towards the Jews has been greatly evident. The Jewish race has acted as Escape Goat for many crisis throughout history including the black plaque which swept across Europe in the 14th century. The establishment of Israel was a great incident was something the Jewish people were striving to obtain for generations. This, however, led to four major conflicts between Israel and the Arab countries. One of the most meaningful wars was the Six-Day War. Events such as the holocaust have also had a dramatic effect on world history and whose mysteries are still being unravelled. ...
    Related: dilemmas, jewish people, jews, concentration camps, after world
  • The Most Extreme Precursor To The Reform Movement Was A Man By - 956 words
    The most extreme precursor to the Reform movement was a man by the name of Samuel Holdheim. He was born in 1806 in Kempo in the province of Posen. At a young age he studied at a yeshiva and received a Talmudic education. He began to study German and secular subjects after his marriage to a woman with a modern education. After their divorce several years later, he began studying at the University of Prague and Berlin and received a doctorate from the University of Leipzig. Following service in Frankfurt -Am-Oder he became a Landesrabbiner or chief Rabbi of Mecklenberg-Schewerin. In the year 1847 he became the rabbinate of a reform congregation in Berlin . At this point he already disapproved ...
    Related: precursor, reform, reform judaism, education after, religious life
  • Theodor Herzl - 730 words
    Theodor Herzl Theodor Herzl was certainly not the first Jew to dream of Zion, but he nevertheless put the wheels in motion (Zionism 1). Zionism is the name given to the political and ideological creation of a Jewish national state. The rise of the Zionist movement in the late 19th century culminated in the creation of this state in Palestine in 1948. Herzl was born of well to do middle-class parents. He first studied in a scientific secondary school, but to escape from its anti-Semitic atmosphere he transferred in 1875 to a school where most of the students were Jews. In 1878 the family moved from Budapest to Vienna, where he entered the University of Vienna to study law. He received his lic ...
    Related: middle class, jewish state, jewish history, shortly, switzerland
  • Theodore Herzl - 1,111 words
    Theodore Herzl Theodore Herzl was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1860. He was raised in an assimilated Jewish family that celebrated Christmas. He moved to Vienna, Austria, where he studied for the bar exam and later in 1884 was awarded a doctorate of law from the University of Vienna. However, instead of practicing law, he chose the dual career of journalist and playwright. His Judaism was not much of a factor in his life. In 1894, when Herzl was 34, an earth-shattering event in France transformed his life forever. He was sent there to cover the trial of Alfred Dreyfus. Dreyfus was a French Jewish Army captain accused of treason, for selling military secrets to Germany. It soon became obviou ...
    Related: theodore, jewish history, jewish state, eastern europe, outsiders
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