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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: bloc

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  • Bloc Quebecois - 1,677 words
    Bloc Quebecois The Bloc Quebecois is the hope for Quebec, while the rest of Canada plot's to take away our individuality, heritage and language from us, we the Bloc are sworn to protect these segments of Quebec. The purpose of the Bloc Quebecois is to ensure that Quebec is fairly represented in the House of Commons and that we, the people of Quebec, obtain all that we require to ensure that Quebec will be strong in the future when we separate from Canada. If we get a fair number of seats in the House of Commons, we would not use ourpower to block economic benefits for other parts of Canada. But we would act in the best self-interests of Quebec. The Bloc is a pro-sovereignty party, and the Bl ...
    Related: bloc, house of commons, american free, care plan, destroying
  • Bloc Quebecois - 1,677 words
    Bloc Quebecois The Bloc Quebecois is the hope for Quebec, while the rest of Canada plot's to take away our individuality, heritage and language from us, we the Bloc are sworn to protect these segments of Quebec. The purpose of the Bloc Quebecois is to ensure that Quebec is fairly represented in the House of Commons and that we, the people of Quebec, obtain all that we require to ensure that Quebec will be strong in the future when we separate from Canada. If we get a fair number of seats in the House of Commons, we would not use ourpower to block economic benefits for other parts of Canada. But we would act in the best self-interests of Quebec. The Bloc is a pro-sovereignty party, and the Bl ...
    Related: bloc, north american, free trade, middle class, minister
  • Alexander The Great - 5,120 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander III, more commonly known as Alexander the Great, was one of the greatest military leaders in world history. He was born in Pella, Macedonia, then a Greek nation. The exact date of his birth is uncertain, but was probably either July 20 or 26, 356 B.C. Alexander was considered a child from his birth until 341 B.C. His princehood lasted from 340 to 336 B.C. In 336 B.C. Philip II, his father, was assassinated, thus making Alexander king. Alexander became a military leader in 335, and remained one until his death in 323 B.C. He reigned from 336 B.C. until 323 B.C., when he died. His military campaign in Persia lasted from 334 to 329, and in 328 he began his campaign ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great alexander, king alexander, asia minor
  • Australia And Asia Relationship - 1,209 words
    Australia and Asia relationship Australia and Asia relationship This essay analyses the Australian-China bilateral relationship since 1945 and in particular its political significance to Australia. Many global factors have influenced this relationship, including the advent of the Cold War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the collapse of the Soviet bloc European nations. In addition, internal political changes in Australia and China have both affected and been affected by the global changes. It will be analysed that Australia's bilateral relationship with China has always had a sharp political edge but that approaching the new millenium economics and trade considerations are shaping Austr ...
    Related: asia, asia pacific, australia, east asia, political system
  • Bolsheviks In 1920 - 1,777 words
    ... rences between themselves and the Russians (p. 80). In 1918, near the end of World War I, forces from the United States, France, and Britain gathered in Russia to "expand the eastern front" against the Germans (p. 84). The purpose of these interventions at first was to use Russian soil to win World War I, not to support either side of an ideological civil war that had just begun and was occurring simultaneously (p. 84). Before Russia made several questionable decisions in World War I, the ideology behind the Bolshevik regime was not challenged heavily by the west (Harris). Ulam states, "Until November 1918, the Allied intervention in Russia had nothing ideological about it. It was design ...
    Related: bolsheviks, social order, russian state, civil war, kiev
  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,714 words
    ... states of the west began to take notice of the ideological differences between themselves and the Russians . In 1918, near the end of WWI, forces from the United States, France, and Britain gathered in Russia to "expand the eastern front" against the Germans . The purpose of these interventions at first was to use Russian soil to win WWI, not to support either side of the ideological civil war that had just begun and was occurring simultaneously . Before Russia made several questionably decisions in WWI, the ideology behind the Bolshevik regime was not challenged heavily by the west. Ulam states, "Until November 1918, the Allied intervention in Russia had nothing ideological about it. It ...
    Related: bolsheviks, russian civil, russian state, soviet union, compose
  • Canadian National Unity - 1,822 words
    Canadian National Unity Canadian National Unity has been a serious debate to all Canadians for close to three decades now. Starting with French President Charles DeGaulle, who in visiting Quebec told a large crowd in Motreal, Vivre le Quebec libre! or, Live in a free Quebec. This one event started the whole modern separtist movement in Canada, and brought us to where we are now. They went from one person with an idea then, to 2 provincial parties, and a federal one as well, now. This is a very serious issue, that could end up in the destuction of an amazing country. Its not like theyre bluffing, weve had two Referendums on this issue (one almost resulting in a Yes vote), and numerous Constit ...
    Related: canadian, canadian dollar, national assembly, unity, social problems
  • Causes Of The Korean War - 1,355 words
    Causes Of The Korean War Causes of the Korean War Andrew Glass Global Studies Period Seven The Korean War, 1950-1953 After the USSR installed a Communist government in North Korea in September 1948, that government promoted and supported an insurgency in South Korea in an attempt to bring down the recognized government and gain jurisdiction over the entire Korean peninsula. Not quite two years later, after the insurgency showed signs of failing, the northern government undertook a direct attack, sending the North Korea People's Army south across the 38th parallel before daylight on Sunday, June 25, 1950. The invasion, in a narrow sense, marked the beginning of a civil war between peoples of ...
    Related: korean, korean conflict, korean peninsula, korean war, north korean, south korean
  • Chilean Economic Shock Therapy - 1,146 words
    Chilean Economic Shock Therapy Chile is seen to be the quintessential model of liberal restructuring in Latin America in the late twentieth century. After the overthrow of the socialist regime of Salvador Allende in 1973, Chiles government has implemented an authoritative economic restructuring program that replaced state intervention with market incentives and opened Chile to the global economy. This four-phase process transformed the economy from highly protective industrialized to an open free market economy based on agricultural exports. The process by which the Chilean economy was stabilized was termed shock therapy. Like other dramatic economic policy changes, the therapy caused the un ...
    Related: chilean, economic benefits, economic change, economic crisis, economic growth, economic policy, shock
  • Chinese Economic Strategies - 1,903 words
    Chinese Economic Strategies Current Chinese economic strategies have blast the country into the world economy at full speed. While China's economy had been growing at nine percent a year over the past ten years, which led to China's gross domestic product to rise to the seventh in the world. However, with 1.3 billion people China remains a market with great potential for U.S. exporters. U.S. exports to China grew a meager two percent in 1996, but increased by 6.9 percent in 1997. The strongest growth in U.S. exports to China was in the services sector, which showed a positive trade balance in 1997 of $1.1 billion. In 1979 the Chinese have implemented numerous economic and political tactics t ...
    Related: chinese, chinese economic, chinese economy, chinese government, chinese market, chinese trade, economic benefits
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,243 words
    Clash Of Civilizations The Clash of Civilizations suggests that world politics is entering a new phase. It is his hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in the New World will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. Huntington believes that the great divisions amongst humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be in the cultural form. Nation states will still remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. Huntington states: "The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines o ...
    Related: chinese civilization, clash, western civilization, economic systems, north america
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,240 words
    ... ed to the Western impact in one or more of three ways: rejecting both modernization and Westernization, embracing both, or embracing modernization and rejecting Westernization. In the twentieth century improvements in transportation and communication and global interdependence increased tremendously the costs of exclusion. Except for small, isolated, rural, communities willing to exist at a subsistence level, the total rejection of modernization as well as Westernization is hardly possible in a world becoming overwhelmingly modern and highly interconnected. Kemalism, which is the embrace of both concepts, is based on the assumptions that modernization is desirable and necessary, that the ...
    Related: clash, western civilization, latin america, progressive era, substantial
  • Cold War - 1,021 words
    Cold War Cold War My first inclination would be to answer the first question with a clear "YES". But come to think of it, the causes of war really have not changed at all, or at least very little. Rather than changes, there has been a shift in the causes. The cause of war which has dominated the last 50 years was the cause of ideology. However, due to the recent end of the Cold War, this cause of war, has significantly declined and is almost trivial. The causes of war have shifted from mainly ideological ones to economic, ethnic and others. Although these reasons have always played a role as causes of war throughout history, they were in the last 50 years overshadowed by the cause of ideolog ...
    Related: cold war, soviet union, foreign policy, last year, multinational
  • Cold War - 1,052 words
    ... and told the US to mind its own business. The US has certainly lost some importance of its leading role in the world, and this is also due to its internal problems with which it seems unable to cope with. There is a tremendous high crime rate within the USA, and poverty is like in some Third World countries. The USA also has to cope with inflation and an either stagnating or declining economy (the last two problems previously unknown to the USA). Thus criticism arose as to whether the USA is still suitable to take up the role of leading world power and interfere in conflicts between other states, since it seems to be unable to cope with its own problems. Recent criticism also arose over ...
    Related: cold war, post cold, middle east, security council, veto
  • Communism East Europe - 3,047 words
    Communism East Europe TITLE: Why did communism collapse in Eastern Europe? SUBJECT: European Studies B EDUCATION: First year university GRADE: first honour AUTHOR'S COMMENTS: I liked it. Interested to hear other people's comments. TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Well done!! Extremely informative. Well researched. Good Layout. Stress Gorbachev's role more. Communism is like Prohibition - its a good idea but it wont work (Will Rogers, 1927) (1) This essay will give a brief introduction to communism. It will then discuss the various factors which combined to bring about the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. It will examine each of these factors and evaluate the effect of each. Finally it will attempt ...
    Related: communism, east europe, east germany, eastern europe, western europe
  • Communism East Europe - 3,045 words
    Communism East Europe TITLE: Why did communism collapse in Eastern Europe? SUBJECT: European Studies B EDUCATION: First year university GRADE: first honour AUTHOR'S COMMENTS: I liked it. Interested to hear other people's comments. TUTOR'S COMMENTS: Well done!! Extremely informative. Well researched. Good Layout. Stress Gorbachev's role more. Communism is like Prohibition - its a good idea but it wont work (Will Rogers, 1927) (1) This essay will give a brief introduction to communism. It will then discuss the various factors which combined to bring about the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. It will examine each of these factors and evaluate the effect of each. Finally it will attempt ...
    Related: communism, east europe, east germany, eastern europe, western europe
  • Communism East Europe - 2,955 words
    ... a contributing factor to the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. If a party has not got the support of a majority, then it has a weak political basis. The fact that undemocratic means were used to ensure that the communists came to, and then maintained, power shows that communism was a political failure. Throughout the history of communism in Russia, never once did the party gain a majority support or truly succeed in suppressing public demonstrations of antipathy towards communism. It can therefore be argued that a political leadership with no political basis or support could ever hope to survive. Another important factor to note is communisms utter failure in relation to society a ...
    Related: century europe, communism, east europe, east european, east german, east germany, eastern europe
  • Cuban History - 1,542 words
    ... nd. The agrarian reform laws promulgated in its first years mainly affected U.S. sugar interests; the operation of plantations by companies controlled by non-Cuban stockholders was prohibited, and the Castro regime initially de-emphasized sugar production in favor of food crops. Break with the United States When the Castro government expropriated an estimated $1 billion in U.S.-owned properties in 1960, Washington responded by imposing a trade embargo. A complete break in diplomatic relations occurred in January 1961, and on April 17 of that year U.S.-supported and -trained anti-Castro exiles landed an invasion force in the Bay of Pigs in southern Cuba. Ninety of the invaders were killed ...
    Related: cuban, cuban government, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, cuban revolution, history
  • Cubas Politics - 1,637 words
    ... ucation, jobs, health care, and equality for Cubans large lower class, many of whom are of African descent. They appreciated it then, and some still support Castro now. With the sudden end of Soviet subsidies (estimated at $5 billion a year), Cuban living conditions went from bad to worse. From 1990 to 1993, Cubas GDP declined by forty percent. Many Cubans went hungry. Castro, reading the desperate mood of the masses, discovered his approaching obsolescence and gave indications that he might reform. The Cuban people, yearning for reform, began to hope for a new day.17 It is evident that the political disposition of the country, as in most countries, has been influenced by its economic st ...
    Related: communications technology, prentice hall, economic status, manpower, potentially
  • Democratic Ecohumanism, Market Civilization - 1,363 words
    ... ntal/ humanistic dichotomy in order to realize the essential interconnectedness of these two arenas, so that when Shiva describes the over fishing of the shrimp beds off of the coast of India, we are reminded that the costs are equally felt in the environment and the dissolution of local fishing cultures. (Shiva, 37-54) Because the priorities of the market, (namely continuous development and wealth generation for the small minority which sits atop the neo-liberal hierarchy), are radically opposed to eco-humanistic ideal which we can assume are basically shared by the resource-poor majority of the world, the neo-liberal system is forced to manufacture consent in a manner that Gill finds e ...
    Related: civilization, market, market economy, money supply, american system
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